Patents by Inventor Kush T. Tyagi

Kush T. Tyagi has filed for patents to protect the following inventions. This listing includes patent applications that are pending as well as patents that have already been granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

  • Publication number: 20200252215
    Abstract: Message authenticators for quantum-secured communications facilitate low-latency authentication with assurances of security. Low-latency message authenticators are especially valuable in infrastructure systems where security and latency constraints are difficult to satisfy with conventional non-quantum cryptography. For example, a message transmitter receives a message and derives an authentication tag for the message based at least in part on an authenticator that uses one or more quantum keys. The message transmitter outputs the message and its authentication tag. A message receiver receives a message and authentication tag for the message. The message receiver derives a comparison tag for the message based at least in part on an authenticator that uses one or more quantum keys. The message receiver checks whether the message is authentic based on a comparison of the authentication tag and the comparison tag. In example implementations, the authenticator uses stream-wise cyclic redundancy code operations.
    Type: Application
    Filed: February 24, 2020
    Publication date: August 6, 2020
    Applicant: Triad National Security, LLC
    Inventors: Richard J. Hughes, Jane E. Nordholt, Charles G. Peterson, Kush T. Tyagi, Christopher C. Wipf, Raymond T. Newell, Kevin P. McCabe, Nicholas Dallmann
  • Patent number: 10574461
    Abstract: Message authenticators for quantum-secured communications facilitate low-latency authentication with assurances of security. Low-latency message authenticators are especially valuable in infrastructure systems where security and latency constraints are difficult to satisfy with conventional non-quantum cryptography. For example, a message transmitter receives a message and derives an authentication tag for the message based at least in part on an authenticator that uses one or more quantum keys. The message transmitter outputs the message and its authentication tag. A message receiver receives a message and authentication tag for the message. The message receiver derives a comparison tag for the message based at least in part on an authenticator that uses one or more quantum keys. The message receiver checks whether the message is authentic based on a comparison of the authentication tag and the comparison tag. In example implementations, the authenticator uses stream-wise cyclic redundancy code operations.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 30, 2014
    Date of Patent: February 25, 2020
    Assignee: Triad National Security, LLC
    Inventors: Richard John Hughes, Jane Elizabeth Nordholt, Charles Glen Peterson, Kush T. Tyagi, Christopher C. Wipf, Raymond Thorson Newell, Kevin P. McCabe, Nicholas Dallmann
  • Patent number: 9680641
    Abstract: Techniques and tools for quantum key distribution (“QKD”) between a quantum communication (“QC”) card, base station and trusted authority are described herein. In example implementations, a QC card contains a miniaturized QC transmitter and couples with a base station. The base station provides a network connection with the trusted authority and can also provide electric power to the QC card. When coupled to the base station, after authentication by the trusted authority, the QC card acquires keys through QKD with a trust authority. The keys can be used to set up secure communication, for authentication, for access control, or for other purposes. The QC card can be implemented as part of a smart phone or other mobile computing device, or the QC card can be used as a fillgun for distribution of the keys.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: April 6, 2015
    Date of Patent: June 13, 2017
    Assignee: Los Alamos National Security, LLC
    Inventors: Jane E. Nordholt, Richard John Hughes, Raymond Thorson Newell, Charles Glen Peterson, Danna Rosenberg, Kevin Peter McCabe, Kush T. Tyagi, Nicholas Dallmann
  • Publication number: 20160248586
    Abstract: Message authenticators for quantum-secured communications facilitate low-latency authentication with assurances of security. Low-latency message authenticators are especially valuable in infrastructure systems where security and latency constraints are difficult to satisfy with conventional non-quantum cryptography. For example, a message transmitter receives a message and derives an authentication tag for the message based at least in part on an authenticator that uses one or more quantum keys. The message transmitter outputs the message and its authentication tag. A message receiver receives a message and authentication tag for the message. The message receiver derives a comparison tag for the message based at least in part on an authenticator that uses one or more quantum keys. The message receiver checks whether the message is authentic based on a comparison of the authentication tag and the comparison tag. In example implementations, the authenticator uses stream-wise cyclic redundancy code operations.
    Type: Application
    Filed: September 30, 2014
    Publication date: August 25, 2016
    Inventors: Richard John HUGHES, Jane Elizabeth NORDHOLT, Charles Glen PETERSON, Kush T. TYAGI, Christopher C. WIPF, Raymond Thorson NEWELL, Kevin P. MCCABE, Nicholas DALLMANN
  • Publication number: 20160065365
    Abstract: Techniques and tools for quantum key distribution (“QKD”) between a quantum communication (“QC”) card, base station and trusted authority are described herein. In example implementations, a QC card contains a miniaturized QC transmitter and couples with a base station. The base station provides a network connection with the trusted authority and can also provide electric power to the QC card. When coupled to the base station, after authentication by the trusted authority, the QC card acquires keys through QKD with a trust authority. The keys can be used to set up secure communication, for authentication, for access control, or for other purposes. The QC card can be implemented as part of a smart phone or other mobile computing device, or the QC card can be used as a fillgun for distribution of the keys.
    Type: Application
    Filed: April 6, 2015
    Publication date: March 3, 2016
    Applicant: Los Alamos National Security, LLC
    Inventors: Jane E. NORDHOLT, Richard John HUGHES, Raymond Thorson NEWELL, Charles Glen PETERSON, Danna ROSENBERG, Kevin Peter MCCABE, Kush T. TYAGI, Nicholas DALLMANN
  • Patent number: 9002009
    Abstract: Techniques and tools for quantum key distribution (“QKD”) between a quantum communication (“QC”) card, base station and trusted authority are described herein. In example implementations, a QC card contains a miniaturized QC transmitter and couples with a base station. The base station provides a network connection with the trusted authority and can also provide electric power to the QC card. When coupled to the base station, after authentication by the trusted authority, the QC card acquires keys through QKD with a trusted authority. The keys can be used to set up secure communication, for authentication, for access control, or for other purposes. The QC card can be implemented as part of a smart phone or other mobile computing device, or the QC card can be used as a fillgun for distribution of the keys.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 30, 2010
    Date of Patent: April 7, 2015
    Assignee: Los Alamos National Security, LLC
    Inventors: Jane Elizabeth Nordholt, Richard John Hughes, Raymond Thorson Newell, Charles Glen Peterson, Danna Rosenberg, Kevin Peter McCabe, Kush T. Tyagi, Nicholas Dallman
  • Publication number: 20130101119
    Abstract: Techniques and tools for quantum key distribution (“QKD”) between a quantum communication (“QC”) card, base station and trusted authority are described herein. In example implementations, a QC card contains a miniaturized QC transmitter and couples with a base station. The base station provides a network connection with the trusted authority and can also provide electric power to the QC card. When coupled to the base station, after authentication by the trusted authority, the QC card acquires keys through QKD with a trusted authority. The keys can be used to set up secure communication, for authentication, for access control, or for other purposes. The QC card can be implemented as part of a smart phone or other mobile computing device, or the QC card can be used as a fillgun for distribution of the keys.
    Type: Application
    Filed: September 30, 2010
    Publication date: April 25, 2013
    Applicant: Los Alamos National Security LLC
    Inventors: Jane Elizabeth Nordholt, Richard John Hughes, Raymond Thorson Newell, Charles Glen Peterson, Danna Rosenberg, Kevin Peter McCabe, Kush T. Tyagi, Nicholas Dallmann