Thermal Energy Radiance Expander

A specially design missile system use for hindering the centrifugal forces inside vortexes commonly known as tornados. The missile system composed of a typical modified vehicle with a design platform. The platform is design of the insides of a platform that contains liquid and compressed gas. A command and control module and a projectile missile system complement above the platform. When a super cell appears and probable starting of tornado activity commences the Thermal Energy Radiance Expander system is send over to the targeted area. As the initial start of the tornado commences the vehicle and whole system is sent to the target area. The missile is then loaded with the gaseous element turn live and launch on to the target. The missile control through the command module explodes intentionally at the side of the vortex. The aim of the system is to break and hinder further activity of the vortex hence terminating tornado.

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Description

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of the U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/766,222, filed Dec. 31, 2005. For “THERMAL ENERGY RADIANCE EXPANDER” which is hereby incorporated by reference herein.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a method and system of diverting the start of vortex anomalies herein known as tornados. A method of using the system process which hinder cyclonic vortexes from birth, growth, or continuity. The system itself is a projectile design to contest the ferocity of tornado vortexes from bridging between super-cells to ground. A method and system contemplating the continuity of tornado activity by inhibiting engagement cloud to ground bridge.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Energy in motion is part of the life cycle. Energy deliverance from our sun provides energy transference all around our planet. Planetary mechanics and solar energy provide our planet with climates. In turn, climates promote energy distribution through weather. Weather is the distribution of energy through the mechanics of hurricanes, storms, and tornados. Tornados are weather anomalies in motion. A rotating vortex mirrors the energy intensities in thunderstorms. Although the energy release from a thunderstorm through a tornado is proportional, they are enough to cause destruction. Destruction from tornados is because of the concentration of energy release in a limited area.

Because the release of energy of a thunderstorm through a tornado is to a limited area in short limited time at the human level they are apparently violent. The transference of energy through the tornadic event may seem biblical they are a usual release of energy. Evidently, the beginning and demise of a tornado causes destruction and strife to human life.

Due to circumstances beyond our control, we have created various means to an end by creating inventions that lessen the destructive effects of tornados. We have made materials with a goal of deterring or lessening the effects of flying materials. Warning systems warn of possible tornados are also deployed. In addition the invention of tornados aid in preserving of life.

Material buildings build and design to withstand the forces of tornados are few. U.S. Pat. No. 4,144,802 to Babin, reacts to ventilation and pressure that only works after the fact of the presence of a tornado. According to U.S. Pat. No. 5,551,916 to Morse, is a reactor to air pressure in its environment. This process only limits protection from pressure discrepancies between outside and inside of a building and not from flying debris, and other conditions arising from tornados. U.S. Pat. No. 6,931,813 to Collie, wraps inside building material, which enforces the structural building. Although U.S. Pat. No. 6,931,813 Collie, reinforces structural rigidity of a building nevertheless does not eliminate protection from flying debris, and other conditions arising from tornados.

New technologies and technology application also serve as warning systems. They serve as warning as weather conditions suitable for a tornado culminate. These warning systems allow people to have enough time to seek shelter. U.S. Pat. No. 6,034,608 to Frank and Johnnie, monitors weather characteristics typical of emanating tornados. Monitoring of weather characteristics may only warn of provable conditions but not of certain of tornado activity. U.S. Pat. No. 6,097,296 to Garza, et al. and U.S. Pat. No. 6,751,580 to Cope, et al. both detectors of sounds that are typical of tornados. They may warn of sounds that culminate from weather conditions typical of tornados but are limited to actual tornados every time. U.S. Pat. No. 6,255,953 to Barber, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,295,001 to Barber, provide of a warning system that depends on the U.S. Government National Weather Service. The dependence on an independent source such as the government entity provides a limit source to people aware of the technology. U.S. Pat. No. 6,232,882 to Hed, et al. is an innovation that uses magnetism and radio frequencies to detect. The use of magnetic and radio frequencies to detect tornadic activity does not protect against wind gusts, pressure differential in the environment and other typical tornado conditions.

Shelters on the other hand allow a group of people to seek protection from harms way. Shelters do provide most of the time protection against tornadic activity. U.S. Pat. No. 4,126,972 to Silen, provides a concrete anchored room. This allows to those seeking protection and the innovation to stay resident in a location. Financial circumstances and already build homes limits U.S. Pat. No. to 4,126,972 to Silen, in being use around the country. U.S. Pat. No. 4,955,166 to Qualline and Dunnam, uses a spherical type tornado shelter use underground. Even though U.S. Pat. No. 4,959,166 to Qualline and Dunnam, may provide shelter in high winds, it does not protect against damage to buildings and does not serve as a warning system. U.S. Pat. No. 5,979,128 to Parsons, serves as immediate protection is only available to limited type buildings. U.S. Pat. No. 5,979,128 to Parsons does not provide immediate shelter from tornados to large groups and multilevel buildings. U.S. Pat. No. 6,151,841 to Green, emphasis economic material design as providing shelter against tornado activity. Designing a shelter of a particular shape with special materials does not protect against heavy large objects.

In conclusion, the use of special materials design to protect against pressure and winds do provide protection. Warning systems in addition warn against coming tornadic activity. Shelters on the other hand are more practical in everyday circumstances. None of these innovations deals with the practical destruction of a tornado.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention solves the problems neglected by prior art by tackling the formation of vortexes in thunderstorms. The object of the present invention is to dismantle centrifugal force emanating from below of super cells that turn into tornados. The advantage of the present invention over prior art is the head on confrontation of vortexes. By driving a vehicle to the presence of weather conditions where tornados are problem and by releasing a projectile design especially for tornados.

According to the present invention, the objective is to drive near the presence of a super cell. Since super cells are the direct precursor of tornados through thunderstorms the possibilities of a tornado evolves. The use of a vehicle mounted with a supportive platform and modified with a projectile is use. The large vehicle carries a platform design to carry heavy equipment has an attach section that carries a large platform. Below the platform are containers and other equipment use to carry an operation on a surgical strike on a tornado. Containers carrying liquefied gas is use to load a projectile missile with this gas. Tornado presence detected on the carry on module a projectile is loaded then with liquefied gas. As the tornado matures, the missile is made live in the control module and fired into the tornado. As the tornado turns the missile object is to hit on section of the vortex.

An object of the present invention is to dismantle the vortex by disorienting the centrifugal force. The ferocity of the exploding projectile is that as to forcefully neglect the continuance of the vortex. An advantage of the present invention over prior art is that special design structures, warning system, and shelters, is the direct confrontation and elimination of tornado vortexes.

In conclusion the lack of prior art in confronting a tornado head on does not eliminate the birth and continuity of a tornado. The present invention serves as deterrent.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

A system process use for the direct engagement of tornadic anomaly with the use by employing a ground crew, a mobile weather chasing vehicle, and a missile battery system that when made active is use to hit a vortex. In the following detailed description, various specific details are set forth in order to provide clarity and understanding of the present invention. Nevertheless, it will be obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art that that these specific details need not be used to practice the present invention. The complexities of the present invention entail people skill in the art as well various disciplines to use commonly the present invention as specifically intended to confront tornadic activities. The forward description is for use with intended present technology.

FIG. 1 is a side view of the mobile launcher (3) deploying the missile (4) as a cloud from above creates a tornado (1). The deploying missile (4) is set to engage head-on the tornado (1) before heading toward a building (5). Since tornados create, some of the highest wind gusts on earth the missile (4) is design with a high impulse also know in the art as ISP. Further details on comparing and contrasting tornado wind gusts to explosives technology are discuss in preceding tables. In FIG. 2 a closer look at the moments leading to the eventual engagement are portrait. As always below the cloud (2) is a surging tornado (1) twisting on its own axis, as the live missile (4) is about to hit the outer area of the tornado (1). A fully developed tornado (1) is shown as the vortex has touched the ground (6). FIG. 2 shows a fully developed tornado (1) with three sectionalize areas. The first section is V1, which is the vortex-to-cloud bridge; the second section is V2 that is the middle body, and V3, which is the vortex-to-ground bridge. The preferred intent of the present invention is to hit the tornado in the V1 section.

In FIG. 3 a tornado (1) is shown after a hit. An opening (7) at the upper section illustrates the tornado with part of the section missing. The cloud (2) still in contact with its lower tornadic event still presents connectivity between three parts, the cloud (2) itself, the tornado (1) and ground (6). FIG. 4 illustrates parts of the tornado (1) missing moments after a hit by a missile (4). Since the momentum of cyclonic activity perpetuates for a short period, the cloud (2) to ground (6) connection is dismantle. FIG. 5 illustrates how the cyclonic momentum induce by a tornado (1) still endures as parts of the vortex even though by this time cloud (2) to ground (6) connectivity is greatly reduced. FIG. 7 illustrates the aim of the missile, as no cloud (2) to ground (6) connection is apparent.

In the following three illustrations the process is repeatedly shown but from a different angle. In FIG. 8 the missile (4) is shown moments before hitting its target. The cyclonic event still carries on with its vortex moving on its axis. As the tornado swirls around a vortex eddy (10) propagates its' surrounding. The vortex corona (8) is what is commonly visible to the naked eye as the twister. The tornado (1) itself maintains a center core referred herein as the vortex center (9). In FIG. 9 the missile (4) illustrates its' explosion at time of engagement with the tornado (1). Although, the vortex center (9) may sustain the grip between the cloud (2) and the ground (6), it is the vortex corona (8) evidently maintains the twisting motion of the cyclonic event. As the illustration eventually shows how the explosion dismantles the vortex corona (8) which in turns disorients the vortex center (9) which results in weakening the vortex eddy (10). In FIG. 10 a more clearly defined explosion is evident as the missile (4) impacts and is exploded. The explosion in a matter of seconds advances throughout the vortexes. Further weakening the vortex corona (8) which in turn weakens the vortex center, thereby reducing the cyclonic edge of the tornado (1), the vortex eddy (10).

In FIG. 11 the diagram illustrates the process of how the present invention works. In FIG. 12-A illustrates the missile (4) that is use in deployment. In FIG. 12-B is the missile (4) and how it is divided by its major components. From pointed end to extended end, the missile (4) is divided first by the nose cone (11). At the middle section is the explosion fuselage (12). The explosion fuselage (12) is the heart of the missile (4), it contains the shape charging designs that culminates in an accelerated shaped explosion. At the trailing edge of the missile (4) is the tail made of the rocket engine housing (13) and the for navigation purposes the fins (14). In FIG. 13 the same missile (4) is divided by its major components. The major components contain themselves part of the missile (4) which makes it unique. The nose cone (11) contains the guidance and control, as well as the control detonator. Guidance and control as with intelligent missile system control the movement of the missile (4) in air. These subcomponents provide the missile (4) guidance from ground crew in the Command & Control Center Pod (22). The middle section, which is the explosive fuselage (12), contains the fuel tank (48) and oxygen tank (49) within the metallic container (34). Surrounding the metallic container (34) are numerous metal frames that support the metallic container (34) in position. The latter section is the rocket engine (13) and housing. Surrounding the rocket engine (13) and housing are missile fins (14) which are use to control the missile in motion.

In order for the missile (4) to properly move through the air and onto the target requires a mobile system, a mobile launcher (3) that has a Command & Control Center Pod (22). In addition, next to the Command & Control Center Pod (22) is the missile launching pod (16) which sits on top of the missile pod plate (17). The mobile launcher (3) holds on its back two major components. They are the Command & Control Center Pod (22) use to command the missile (4) targeted toward the tornado (1). In addition, it controls navigation on how the missile (4) moves in air. In addition, it is where the missile (4) rocket engine (13) is control, as well as the explosive (31) is control for explosion. The Command & Control Center Pod (22) has electronic devices inside use for communications between itself and the missile (4). From top down, the Command & Control Center Pod (22) has a 360° window (23) use for clear view of the outside environment. A window (22) is also attach on the sides, on one side a door (26). Next to the 360° window (23) is an antenna (24) for communications. At the middle of the mobile launcher (3) is an exhaust barrier (20) that deflects the missile (4) rocket engine (13) exhaust. The exhaust barrier (20) shields from heat and fumes when the missile (4) trailing edges faces the Command & Control Center Pod (22). The mobile launcher (3) has on its trailer launch plate (18) that supports the Command & Control Center Pod (22) and the trailer plate (25). The launch plate (18) also supports oxygen/fuel tanks (19). The trailer plate (25) supports the missile pod plate (17) which makes the basement for the missile-launching pod (16). The missile-launching pod (16) holds a missile (4) and another on the other side from the top. It is able to move horizontally and it is able to move the missile (4) vertically. FIG. 15 illustrates closer look at all major components that make the trailer section of the mobile launcher (3). In FIG. 16 illustrates the Command & Control Center Pod (22) in more detail, it stands above the trailer plate (25) which allows a sustainable bed and structural integrity. At the right side of the figure is the exhaust barrier (20) that provides protection from heat and fumes. The Command & Control Center Pod (22) as explain above is the center for commanding the missile (4) when launch and exploding it by command. The figure shows an entrance (26) above it a lookout window (21) and above it is another window that permits a complete view around, this 360° window (23) aids in seeing the missile (4) as well as the tornado (1) including all viewable activity in the vicinity. Next to the 360° window (23) is a transceiver antenna (24) which is use for communications and radio link with the missile (4). This antenna provides the link between the Command Control Center Pod (22) communications electronics and the missile (4) which is set to explode by command.

In FIG. 17 the second section, residing above the trailer plate (25) is the missile pod plate (17) which as stated forms the basis of the missile battery system. Below the missile pod plate (17) are the lower fuel/oxygen conduit line (27) that when entering the horizontal missile attenuator (16) turns into lower diameter conduit, but is the same upper fuel/oxygen conduit line (28). In order to make the missile (4) live, fuel and oxygen are delivered via the upper fuel/oxygen conduit line (28) through the horizontal missile attenuator (16) which pass through the vertical missile attenuator (29). The vertical missile attenuator (29) permits vertical movement of the missile (4) in addition to holding the missile in place through the missile clamp (30). On the opposite side of the missile (4) is another missile (4) which is attach to the vertical missile attenuator (29) via the missile clamp (30). This missile is the F5 missile (15) use for strong tornados. Since tornados come in different sizes categorized by a commonly known system use for categorizing tornados, the F5 missile (15) is use for large tornados. These missiles are specially design to explode in an explosive manner according to design.

FIG. 18 shows a more detail inside of the missile (4) as the outer area, its outside skin the explosive fuselage (12) is open for view. The internal components are simple to understand for someone skill in the art of explosives and rocketry. Below the explosive fuselage (12) is the explosive (31) which surrounds the outer parameter around the inner supporting frame (32). The explosive fitted around the inner frame (32) and under the explosive fuselage (12) since it will set to explode outwardly in a manner of a shaped explosive. This explosion explained in more detail in the following paragraph. Between the explosive (31) and the metallic container (34) are the inner supporting frame (32) in-between is a free hallow area, a cavity (33). The cavity (33) intended for electrical and required tubing for rocketry according to this design. A closer look is shown in FIG. 19A and FIG. 19B. In FIG. 19A the leading edge of the missile (4) explains how its shape charging mechanism is set, as the linear shape plate (36) is exposed on its side. Working from the outside and inward, is the outer plate (39) area, inward is the middle plate (37) toward the inside is the inner plate (38), these three sections make up the linear shape plate (36). The middle plate (37) has a small exposed opening the electrical/communications port (40) which is necessary for providing interface between the nose cone (11) section, which contains guidance, and control. In FIG. 19B the same section of the missile (4) is exposed. Entailing the same components from the previous figure, the only difference is on the linear shape plate (36) placed on the trailing edge of the missile (4) in between the explosive fuselage (12) and the rocket engine housing (13) is the linear shape plate (39). On the linear shape plate (39) at the middle plate (37) is the electrical/fuel/oxygen port (41) which is use for providing electrical wiring throughout the missile (4) as well as fuel and oxygen between the metallic container (34) and the rocket engine inside the rocket engine housing (13). In FIG. 20 a frontal cut view of the middle section of the missile (4) is explored. From the inside out at the core of the explosive fuselage (12) is the metallic container (34). Outwardly and around it is the inner supporting frame (32), the space in-between is a cavity (33), outwardly around the inner casing (43) which is for supporting the inner structural integrity and the outer integrity between the fuselage casing (42), which also is part of the outer supporting frame (35) and the explosive fuselage (12).

FIG. 21 illustrates how the explosive force is made in a manner consistent with the design of the middle section of the missile (4). In the inside resides the metallic container (34) which is made of strong metalloid. The reason for the metallic container (34) requiring composition and dense structure is that it contemplates the explosive force as the explosion reaction is made to emanate outwards. In addition to providing a utilitarian effect to an explosion, the metallic container (34) also provides housing for the require fuel tank (48) and oxygen tank (49) for the rocket engine in the rocket engine housing (13) residing at the trailing edge of the missile (4). On the left side of the illustration a clear view of the outer parameter of the metallic container (34) which is the inner supporting frame (32), the cavity (33) of air, the outer supporting frame (35), and above it, the explosive. Obviously, other sections make up part of the inner components of the inside of the explosive fuselage (12). Unseen to the naked eye, but apparently at the time of explosion is the explosion vectors (47). These are the compressed gasses and materials exploiting outwards at an accelerated speed. The explosion vectors are what will cut through the vortex with a force that is thousands of times faster than any recordable tornado in history. A more comparable detail analysis of the explosive reactions is mention in FIG. 28.

FIG. 22 further illustrates the explosive force vectors (47) reactance, illustrating the mechanics of the explosion; the figure emphasizes the use of the linear shape plate (36). The explosion shows how the intended explosive reaction forces take shape according to the design. The explosive (31) having to surround the metallic container (34) should explode outwardly. The inner frame (32) and the outer supporting frame (35) in addition to supporting the structural integrity of the missile (4) also provide a linear shape outward explosion. The linear shape plate (36) has on its edges a bend design, this linear shape plate enclave (36-A) assists the explosion move away from the leading and trailing edges of the missile (4). In FIG. 23 on the leading edge of the missile (4) a set of wiring is shown coming from the nose cone (11). These wiring is what makes the missile (4) explosive (31) explode. Since the nose cone (11) contains the processing for the missile, numerous detonating cords (48) which spread throughout the explosive fuselage (12). At the end of each detonating cord (48) is small cylinder type components, each one is a blasting cap (49). Each blasting cap is evenly place on the explosive (31) in order to assist in the explosion in exploding in rapid synchronicity. When the explosion occur the linear shape plate (36) pushes the explosion outwardly to the sides, forcing the explosion vector (47) in the same manner. In FIG. 24 a frontal cutoff view illustrates how the explosion occurs from a different angle. From the inside out, the metallic container (34) is at the center, supported by the inner supporting frame (32) which is connected to inner supporting casing (43). Between the metallic container (34) and the inner supporting casing, apart from the inner supporting frame (32) is a cavity (33) necessary for electrical and fluidic conduits. Outwards from the inner supporting casing (43) is the outer supporting frame (35) which is integrated between the fuselage casing (42) and the inner supporting casing (43). Surrounding the fuselage casing (42) is the explosive fuselage (12). The explosion vector (47) shows the outward movement of the explosion in the illustration.

FIG. 25 emphasizes how the explosion vector (47) would react in a vortex. The explosion vector (47) moves through the vortex many of times faster than the vortex can turn cutting of integral circulation, thereby dismantling the tornado (2) integrity. The explosion cuts through the vortex with more than a million pounds per square inch. FIG. 26 illustrates the Anatomy of Explosion—Process and how the process works, and in FIG. 27 illustrates the Anatomy of Explosion—Actual works. In FIG. 28 the velocities of tornados according to their type are compared to speeds of detonating cord and high explosive. FIG. 28 emphasizes tornado wind speeds and how they measure up to a typical rocket speed, detonating cord and high explosives, the figure shows how even the strongest type of tornado, an F5 is less one fiftieths the speed of a high explosive explosion reactance. A comparison is made in FIG. 29 that shows when velocities of tornado (1) winds to detonating cord and high explosives compare side by side. FIG. 30 further illustrates the Terminal Velocities Ratio; this compares the highest velocities of high explosive speed compared to the highest wind speeds of an F5 tornado.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side view of projectile in a side-winding path onward hitting a tornado.

FIG. 2 is a side view of projectile in proximity to hitting targeted level of tornado.

FIG. 3 is a side view of projectile milliseconds afterwards of hitting targeted area of tornado.

FIG. 4 is a side view of projectile seconds afterwards hindering vortices of cyclonic vortex, thereby dislocating top and lower section.

FIG. 5 is a side view of projectile explosion moments afterwards hampering full contact between upper and lower sections of tornado.

FIG. 6 is a side view of tornado vortex diminishing.

FIG. 7 is a view of full disappearance of tornado vortex.

FIG. 8 is a top view of projectile targeting section of tornado vortex.

FIG. 9 is a top view of projectile exploding at sectional level of tornado vortex.

FIG. 10 is a top view of projectile explosion dismantling structural momentum of tornado vortex.

FIG. 11 is a process flow schematic depicting the process flow of the method of using the system process.

FIG. 12-A is a side view of projectile.

FIG. 12-B is a side view of the projectile depicting command & control transceiver section, explosion sectional body, and motor section.

FIG. 13 is a side view of the projectile with a diagram of the command & control transceiver section, explosion sectional boy, and motor section.

FIG. 14 is a side view of a truck with the platform carrying the command and control module, a launching system, and two rockets.

FIG. 15 is a side view of the truck back section with the platform carrying the command and control module, a launching system, and two rockets.

FIG. 16 is a side view of the command & control module. The command & control module permits the user to guide the missile projectile by controlling it into a tornado.

FIG. 17 is a side view of the launching system, and two rockets. F1 is a smaller rocket design for tornados with a range of F1 to F3. F5 is a large rocket design for tornados with a range of F4 to F5.

FIG. 18 is a partial side view of the explosion sectional body.

FIG. 19A is a partial side open view of the explosion section body. It provides a view of one end exemplifying the design as the one end shown as a shape charge. FIG. 19B is a partial side open view of the explosion section body. It provides a view of one end exemplifying the design as the one end shown as a shape charge.

FIG. 20 is a cut-off view of the explosion sectional body.

FIG. 21 is a sectional view of the middle part of the missile. Most of the components that make the middle section are shown except for wiring and other.

FIG. 22 is how the explosive components behave according to design.

FIG. 23 is a cutoff view of the leading edge of the missile. It shows part of the middle section exemplifying detonators and wiring use to detonate the explosive.

FIG. 24 is a frontal view of the middle section of the missile with a cutoff view.

FIG. 25 is a view of the vectors explosion directions. Is a figure emphasizing how the explosion of the explosive is set to charge according to design.

FIG. 26 is how the Anatomy of Explosion—process works.

FIG. 27 is how the Anatomy of Explosion—actual works.

FIG. 28 is a figure emphasizing how velocities of tornados in comparison to rockets, explosion charge, and actual explosive. The figure explains how fast a tornado is, but emphasizes how much faster the velocities of the missile and explosives are.

FIG. 29 is a chart that compares in column format velocities.

FIG. 30 is a Terminal Velocities Ratio chart. It shows how the fastest tornado in a commonly known scale does not compare in velocity.

Claims

1. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity by means of utilizing high explosives. A method of using a mobile means to confront developing weather patterns that contributes to vortex anomalies. Process uses electronic technology as a means to give user inform decision to confront anomaly. The use of an automated mobile missile system developed for a purpose to attach the vortex anomaly, comprising:

A mobile system design specifically for the purpose targeting a weather pattern whereby a developing weather pattern develops and the radar-employed system will inform of current abrupt weather anomaly;
Processing electronic system able to capture and analyze a weather anomaly commonly known as thunderstorm within a super cell. The radio detection and ranging is able to inform user. The electronic system is use to target weather anomaly;
An automated missile system use for abruptly delimiting a rising vortex anomaly, the automated missile system is for annihilating a developing vortex; and
Control missiles send to targeted vortex anomaly by remote control to the vortex area. The missile contains a rocket system that is able to accelerate rampantly toward the targeted area. The rocket system is made powerful enough that it is able to accelerate through high volatile winds onto target. The missile contains a specially design fuselage with ample quantities of high explosives. The explosives are integrated onto design in order to explode in a shape manner as to dismantle vortex. The shape explosion is initiated by remote control.

2. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 1, wherein said mobile unit provides mobility toward targeted weather anomaly.

3. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 1, wherein said mobile system contains electronic technology able to give intelligent decision making by use of RADAR.

4. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 1, wherein said mobile unit provides a battery system for rapid deployment in targeted area.

5. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity by means of utilizing high explosives. A method of using a mobile means to confront developing weather patterns that contributes to vortex anomalies. Process uses electronic technology as a means to give user inform decision to confront anomaly. The use of an automated mobile missile system developed for a purpose to attach the vortex anomaly, comprising:

A mobile system design specifically for the purpose targeting a weather pattern whereby a developing weather pattern develops and the radar-employed system will inform of current abrupt weather anomaly;
Processing electronic system able to capture and analyze a weather anomaly commonly known as thunderstorm within a super cell. The radio detection and ranging is able to inform user. The electronic system is use to target weather anomaly;
An automated missile system use for abruptly delimiting a rising vortex anomaly, the automated missile system is for annihilating a developing vortex; and
Control missiles send to targeted vortex anomaly by remote control to the vortex area. The missile contains a rocket system that is able to accelerate rampantly toward the targeted area. The rocket system is made powerful enough that it is able to accelerate through high volatile winds onto target. The missile contains a specially design fuselage with ample quantities of high explosives. The explosives are integrated onto design in order to explode in a shape manner as to dismantle vortex. The shape explosion is initiated by remote control.

6. Process for delimiting a vortex from growth according to claim 5, wherein said RADAR system gathers data/information for interpretation for personnel.

7. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 5, wherein said information attained by radar is use for analysis.

8. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 5, wherein said RADAR works with electronic technology in battery system.

9. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity by means of utilizing high explosives. A method of using a mobile means to confront developing weather patterns that contributes to vortex anomalies. Process uses electronic technology as a means to give user inform decision to confront anomaly. The use of an automated mobile missile system developed for a purpose to attach the vortex anomaly, comprising:

A mobile system design specifically for the purpose targeting a weather pattern whereby a developing weather pattern develops and the radar-employed system will inform of current abrupt weather anomaly;
Processing electronic system able to capture and analyze a weather anomaly commonly known as thunderstorm within a super cell. The radio detection and ranging is able to inform user. The electronic system is use to target weather anomaly;
An automated missile system use for abruptly delimiting a rising vortex anomaly, the automated missile system is for annihilating a developing vortex; and
Control missiles send to targeted vortex anomaly by remote control to the vortex area. The missile contains a rocket system that is able to accelerate rampantly toward the targeted area. The rocket system is made powerful enough that it is able to accelerate through high volatile winds onto target. The missile contains a specially design fuselage with ample quantities of high explosives. The explosives are integrated onto design in order to explode in a shape manner as to dismantle vortex. The shape explosion is initiated by remote control.

10. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 9, wherein said battery system is set deployment to targeted area.

11. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 9, wherein said battery system is set live by personnel.

12. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 9, wherein said missile is launch to targeted area.

13. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 9, wherein said missile contains a powerful rocket engine.

14. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 9, wherein said missile contains a power rocket engine that enable rocket penetrate high winds.

15. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 9, wherein said missile is control towards vortex.

16. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 9, wherein said rocket explodes by remote control inside vortex.

17. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 9, wherein said missile explodes in a shape according to missile.

18. Process for delimiting a tornadic event from continuity according to claim 9, wherein said explosion is of a magnitude that inhibit a tornadic event from continuity.

Patent History

Publication number: 20100276533
Type: Application
Filed: Jan 1, 2007
Publication Date: Nov 4, 2010
Inventor: Matteo Bonifacio Gravina (Laredo, TX)
Application Number: 11/618,911

Classifications

Current U.S. Class: Remote Control (244/3.11)
International Classification: F42B 12/20 (20060101);