METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR INTEGRATION AND CONTROL OF POWER FOR CONSUMER POWER CIRCUITS

- CISCO TECHNOLOGY, INC.

In one embodiment, a power distribution system includes a DC power input for receiving DC power from a renewable energy source, an AC power input for receiving AC power, a multi-phase pulse power output for transmitting multi-phase pulse power, an AC power output for transmitting the AC power, and a controller for allocating power to the multi-phase pulse power output and the AC power output.

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Description
TECHNICAL FIELD

The present disclosure relates generally to power systems, and more particularly, to integration and control of power circuits for consumers power circuits.

BACKGROUND

There is a growing demand to update conventional power systems in homes and businesses. Safety issues with conventional AC power continue to exist. New homes in California will soon require the inclusion of solar power systems; however, significant challenges in efficiently implementing renewable energy systems in houses and building circuitry remain. Integration and allocation of renewable energy and new safer power systems, along with conventional AC power will create a number of challenges.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating integration of renewable energy, AC power, and DC power at a consumer power panel, in accordance with one embodiment.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating details of a consumer power system, in accordance with one embodiment.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating a circuit breaker panel for the consumer power system, in accordance with one embodiment.

FIG. 4 illustrates a four-phase pulse power circuit breaker, in accordance with one embodiment.

FIG. 5 is a process flowchart illustrating monitoring and control of power distribution with prioritization between circuits, in accordance with one embodiment.

FIG. 6A illustrates a simplified example of voltage and current for a two-phase pulse power system, in accordance with one embodiment.

FIG. 6B illustrates a simplified example of voltage and current for a three-phase pulse power system, in accordance with one embodiment.

FIG. 7 is a flowchart illustrating an overview of a process for integrating power sources and controlling power distribution, in accordance with one embodiment.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS Overview

In one embodiment, a power distribution system generally comprises a DC power input for receiving DC power from a renewable energy source, an AC power input for receiving AC power, a multi-phase pulse power output for transmitting multi-phase pulse power, an AC power output for transmitting the AC power, and a controller for allocating power to the multi-phase pulse power output and the AC power output.

In one or more embodiments, the multi-phase pulse power and the AC power are delivered to power circuitry in a building for powering end devices and data is delivered with the multi-phase pulse power to one or more of the end devices.

In one or more embodiments, the multi-phase pulse power is delivered to an outlet operable to deliver the multi-phase pulse power or PoE (Power over Ethernet).

In one or more embodiments, the system further comprises an Ethernet power controller in communication with a DC bus receiving the DC power from the renewable energy source and from an AC to DC converter at the AC power input.

In one or more embodiments, the system further comprises a controller operable to allocate output of the DC power to the multi-phase pulse power output based on a load requirement of end devices.

In one or more embodiments, the system further comprises a controller operable to monitor power usage and turn off one or more low priority power circuits when power load exceeds available power.

In one or more embodiments, the controller is operable to turn off the low priority power circuits when the power load exceeds power available from the renewable energy source.

In one or more embodiments, the DC power is integrated at a 380 VDC bus.

In one or more embodiments, the multi-phase pulse power comprises three-phase pulse power at a voltage greater than 56 volts DC.

In one or more embodiments, the renewable energy source comprises at least one of a solar panel, a wind turbine, and a rechargeable battery.

In another embodiment, an apparatus generally comprises an AC circuit breaker, a renewable energy circuit breaker, a multi-phase pulse power circuit breaker, and a switch coupled to the multi-phase pulse power circuit breaker and operable to provide circuit breaker control.

In another embodiment, a method generally comprises receiving AC power, receiving DC power from a renewable energy source, integrating the AC power and the DC power at a power distribution system, monitoring available power and power load, transmitting the AC power, and transmitting multi-phase pulse power comprising a plurality of phases of pulse power, wherein the pulse power comprises a plurality of DC voltage pulses with the DC voltage pulses offset between phases to provide continuous power.

In yet another embodiment, an apparatus generally comprises an input for receiving DC power from a renewable energy source, an output for transmitting multi-phase pulse power and PoE, and a controller for monitoring available power, identifying one or more low priority power circuits, and disabling the low priority power circuits when a power load exceeds the available power.

Further understanding of the features and advantages of the embodiments described herein may be realized by reference to the remaining portions of the specification and the attached drawings.

Example Embodiments

The following description is presented to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to make and use the embodiments. Descriptions of specific embodiments and applications are provided only as examples, and various modifications will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. The general principles described herein may be applied to other applications without departing from the scope of the embodiments. Thus, the embodiments are not to be limited to those shown, but are to be accorded the widest scope consistent with the principles and features described herein. For purpose of clarity, details relating to technical material that is known in the technical fields related to the embodiments have not been described in detail.

Conventional consumer power transmission has been dominated by AC (alternating current) power transmission. However, requirements in the production and consumption of energy along with environmental and conservation concerns are leading to changes in power provision and control in consumer power. For example, there has been a growing increase in consumers adding renewable energy sources locally to produce power. California will soon require new homes to have solar power systems and other states may soon follow. Solar power systems provide power directly into an electrical grid at maximum output capacity. When the electrical grid is in an ‘off’ state, power from the solar system is lost. In some cases, there may be a battery backup and the solar power may be used to charge the battery, however, this type of system is typically inefficient and rarely deployed.

Most wind, solar, and battery systems for residential use comprise 380 VDC (volts direct current) based systems. Most electrical devices in a home can run on 240 VAC (volts alternating current) or 380 VDC with minimal to no effort, and little change in efficiency. Renewable energy technologies have potential to reduce conversion loss as they produce DC output directly negating losses from inverting to AC if they can be connected directly to suitable end loads. However, significant challenges in physically implementing renewable energy solutions in houses and building power circuitry remain. Continued focus on renewable energy systems is driving a need for a managed main circuit panel with integrated wired data along with power allocation so that prioritized circuits can continue to operate as wind, solar, and battery power decrease or increase over a twenty-four hour period, rather than shutting down the system for lack of power supplied.

In addition to the need for integration of renewable energy sources, conventional AC power systems continue to cause safety issues. While there have been improvements that have made delivery of AC power safer over the years, safety concerns still exist with conventional AC power in residential homes.

The embodiments described herein provide a consumer power system that integrates renewable energy sources and safe higher power DC systems with conventional AC power along with power monitoring and data control to provide a system that is safer and interoperable with renewable energy input sources. In one or more embodiments, power sources are integrated at a main power panel along with power allocation so that power may be provided to prioritized circuits if power demand exceeds available power. Power sources may include, for example, renewable energy power sources (e.g., solar panel, wind turbine, rechargeable battery) and AC power from a utility grid. The power system may distribute AC power, PoE (Power over Ethernet), and ESP (Extended Safe Power). PoE and ESP may be used to supply power and data over an Ethernet cable. Power may be carried on the same conductors that carry data or power may be carried on dedicated conductors within the same cable or separate cables. While PoE is generally limited to low power applications (e.g., ≤100 Watts (W)), ESP provides higher power with built in safety.

The term “Extended Safe Power” (“ESP”) as used herein refers to high power (e.g., >100 Watts (W)), high voltage (e.g., ≥56 Volts (V)) operation with pulse power delivered on one or more wires or wire pairs in a cable (e.g., Ethernet cable). In one or more embodiments, ESP includes fault detection (e.g., fault detection at initialization and between high voltage pulses), and pulse synchronization. Power is delivered from power sourcing equipment (PSE) (e.g., power source at a main power panel in a consumer premise (e.g., residential, business, or other building)) to a powered device (PD) (end device, electrical device (e.g., computer, laptop, tablet, phone, security system, camera, consumer device, portable electronics, light, lighting system, and the like)), with the power distributed over consumer power circuits within the building. The power may be transmitted with communications (e.g., bidirectional communications) or without communications.

The term “pulse power” (or “pulsed power”) as used herein refers to power that is delivered in a sequence of pulses (alternating low direct current voltage state and high direct current voltage state) in which the voltage varies between a very small voltage (e.g., close to 0V, 3 VDC) during a pulse-off interval and a larger voltage (e.g., ≥12 VDC, ≥24 VDC) during a pulse-on interval. High voltage pulse power (e.g., ≥56 VDC, ≥60 VDC, ≥300 VDC, ˜108 VDC, ˜380 VDC) may be transmitted from power sourcing equipment to a powered device for use in powering the powered device, as described, for example, in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 16/671,508 (“Initialization and Synchronization for Pulse Power in a Network System”), filed Nov. 1, 2019, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Pulse power transmission may be through cables, transmission lines, bus bars, and power distribution systems, for example.

In one or more embodiments, ESP may comprise pulse power transmitted in multiple phases in a multi-phase pulse power system with pulses offset from one another between wires or wire pairs to provide continuous power, as described below with respect to FIGS. 6A and 6B. One or more embodiments may use multi-phase pulse power to achieve less loss, with continuous uninterrupted power with overlapping phase pulses to a powered device, as described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 16/380,954 (“Multiple Phase Pulse Power in a Network Communications System”), filed Apr. 10, 2019, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

Referring now to the drawings, and first to FIG. 1, a schematic illustrating renewable energy integrated at a main power panel in consumer power circuitry is shown, in accordance with one embodiment. The consumer power system described herein may be implemented in any type of building 10 (e.g., residential, business, industrial, hotel, apartment, school and the like). In the simplified example shown in FIG. 1, the building 10 is configured with renewable energy sources comprising a solar panel 11, a wind turbine 12, and a rechargeable battery 15. The solar and wind systems 11, 12 are coupled to the power circuit through an interface (e.g., renewable energy source power controller) 13. A power distribution system (power inverter/converter) 14 receives input from the power interface 13 and is also coupled to the rechargeable battery (or other energy storage device) 15. As described in detail below, the power inverter/converter 14 also receives AC power from a utility grid. The power distribution system 14 provides AC power and multi-phase pulse power to a main power panel 16 comprising AC power breaker 17 and pulse power circuit breaker 18. As described below, the circuit breaker may be a physical disconnect or electronically controlled. A power controller 19 monitors and controls power distribution with wired data integrated into the power distribution system. The main power panel 16 may be located at any suitable location within the building (e.g., garage, basement, adjacent to exterior wall near electrical power input). The main power panel 16 distributes power throughout the building to any number of outlets or end point devices (loads) (not shown), which consume power (e.g., lighting, computer equipment, entertainment devices, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) equipment, household and kitchen appliances, electrical vehicle charger, or any other device that requires electricity to operate).

It is to be understood that the consumer power system shown in FIG. 1 is only an example, and the system may include additional components, fewer components, or different components, without departing from the scope of the embodiments. For example, the building 10 may only be configured with one of the renewable energy sources shown.

FIG. 2 illustrates details of the consumer power system shown in FIG. 1, in accordance with one embodiment. Power system 20 shown in FIG. 2 includes renewable energy sources comprising solar panels 21, wind system 22, and battery systems 25. In one or more embodiments, a power distribution system 24 comprises one or more DC power inputs 24a for receiving DC power from one or more renewable energy sources (e.g., solar panel 21, wind system 22, battery system 25), an AC power input 24b for receiving AC power, a multi-phase pulse power output 24c for transmitting multi-phase pulse power (or multi-phase pulse power and PoE), AC power output 24d for transmitting the AC power, and a controller 32 for allocating power to the multi-phase pulse power output and the AC power output.

As shown in the example of FIG. 2, the system comprises a DC power module (bus) 28 for receiving input from the renewable energy source (solar panel 21, wind system 22, chargeable battery system 25) and the AC power source (e.g., utility grid power input at an AC power module 31 (AC to DC converter), a multi-phase pulse power system (DC pulse power phase modules) 29 for receiving DC power from the DC bus 28 and delivering multi-phase DC pulse power, and an AC power module 30 (DC to AC inverter) (FIG. 2). The received AC power is converted to DC power at module 31, integrated with the DC power from the renewable energy sources 21, 22, 25, and allocated for transmittal as the multi-phase pulse power. AC power received from the electrical grid at 24b may also be sent directly to AC power output 24d without conversion (e.g., directly from power module 31 to power module 30), for delivery of AC power to power AC end devices in the building or providing power back to the electrical grid. As previously described, the multi-phase DC pulse power and the AC power are delivered to power circuitry for powering end devices (electrical devices) in the building.

The solar panel 21 and wind system 22 are coupled to DC controllers 23 and the battery is coupled to a DC controller/charger 26. The battery system 25 may receive DC power from the power distribution system 24 to charge the battery, and transmit DC power to the power distribution system as needed. The solar panel 21, wind system 22, and battery system 25 are coupled to the power distribution system 24 through physical disconnects (circuit breakers) 27 and may also be configured to transmit or receive data (at the DC controller 23, 26) including a data driven inhibit signal (electrical disconnect).

In the example shown in FIG. 2, the bus 28 comprises a 380 VDC bus, the inverter 30 is configured for converting 380 VDC to 240 VAC, the converter 31 is configured to convert 240 VAC to 380 VDC, and the pulse power is delivered with high voltage pulses of 380 VDC. The AC power modules 30, 31 are configured with circuits A and B, along with neutral (N) and ground (G). It is to be understood that the circuits and voltages shown in FIG. 2 are provided as an example and other voltages may be used, without departing from the scope of the embodiments.

The power controller 32 may comprise an Ethernet power controller coupled to the bus 28, pulse power phase modules 29, and inverter 30 for monitoring and controlling power delivery. The power controller 32 may, for example, control the system to dynamically integrate or convert the available power supplies based on the overall current or expected usage load level of the end devices. As described below, a prioritization and control algorithm may be used to turn off lower priority circuits during times of low power input from the renewable energy sources 21, 22, 25.

The building may include, for example, conventional AC outlets along with DC outlets that may be configured to provide variable or suitable voltage levels to end devices. For example, the building may include any number of outlets 33 (e.g., RJ45 or other Ethernet connector or receptacle suitable for delivering power and transmitting or receiving data) configured with smart detection to switch between PoE (e.g., 90 W) and ESP (e.g., >100 W) based on power requirement or capability of the end device plugged into the outlet.

As previously described, the renewable energy systems are integrated into a consumer power main circuit breaker along with PoE, pulse power, and power control. The circuit breaker may be configured for connection to pulse power or PoE depending on the particular circuit requirements. In one or more embodiments, a circuit breaker system includes an AC circuit breaker 34, a renewable energy circuit breaker 35, a multi-phase pulse power circuit breaker 36, and a switch 41 coupled to the multi-phase pulse power circuit breaker and operable to provide circuit breaker control (FIG. 3).

The system shown in the example of FIG. 3 includes four circuit breakers; 240 VDC HVAC circuit breaker 34, renewable energy circuit breaker 35, multi-phase pulse power circuit breaker 36, and AC/multi-phase pulse power circuit breaker 37. An AC grid power breaker 38 is coupled to AC circuits A and B and a pulse power circuit breaker 39 is coupled to phases P1, P2, and P3 (e.g., at bus bars A, P1, P2, P3, B in FIG. 3). Intelligent power control 40 provides input to the PoE switch 41, which provides electrical circuit breaker control to the pulse power circuit breakers 36 and 37. Manual input (physical disconnect) may be provided for circuit breakers 34 35, and 37, while the multi-phase pulse power circuit breaker 36 may only have an electrically controlled disconnect.

It is to be understood that the circuit breaker system shown in FIG. 3 is only an example and components, circuits, or circuit breakers may be added or modified without departing from the scope of the embodiments. For example, three phases of pulse power are shown in FIG. 3, but any number of phases may be used. In one example, four phases of pulse power may be used (e.g., on four-pair cat 5/6 cable) with a P4 bus added to the system. In another example, a 120 VAC circuit breaker may be used with three-phases of pulse power.

FIG. 4 illustrates an example of a four-phase pulse power circuit breaker with power monitoring and control, in accordance with one embodiment. In the example shown in FIG. 4, the power controller 40 provides input to the PoE switch 41, which is in communication with the four phases. A manual breaker is provided for the AC circuits A and B (currents iA, iB), which have a bus bar connection to the four phases (P1, P2, P3, P4 (currents i1, i2, i3, i4)). Data telemetry provides power monitor and control with input of the currents and corresponding voltages to the power controller 40 at the PoE switch 41. The power control breaker for the four phases may use an electrical pull and may have, for example, FET (Field Effect Transistor) control with switches between pulse power and PoE.

FIG. 5 illustrates an example of power monitor and control, in accordance with one embodiment. Power monitor and control 50 (e.g., from power controller 40 and switch 41 in FIGS. 3 and 4) determine available PoE 52, pulse power 53, and AC grid power 54. If sufficient power is available, power is delivered at 55a, 55b, 55c. If sufficient power is not available (power<power needed), a lookup is performed at a priority list at 56a, 56b, or 56c. Priority is determined between the circuits based on a priority list (step 57) and one or more lower priority circuits are disconnected at 58a, 58b, or 58c, as needed. Peak energy requirements may be balanced, for example, by turning off systems (e.g., HVAC) that have been allocated as low priority to prevent the need to have additional capacity built in for peak usage.

In one or more embodiments, a prioritization and control algorithm may be implemented so that as renewable energy sources dwindle (e.g., in a twenty-four hour period), appropriate prioritization may be applied to keep select circuits active, while inhibiting others. For example, it may be important to maintain power at a refrigerator and security camera, while power to kitchen lighting and ceiling fans may be turned off. A percentage of power may be disabled and reallocated elsewhere during downward trends in solar or wind energy, for example, thereby significantly preserving battery life.

As previously described, power delivered by the power distribution system may comprise high voltage pulse power or high voltage multi-phase pulse power (high voltage DC power). The multi-phase pulse power comprises a plurality of phases of pulse power, with the pulse power comprising a plurality of DC voltage pulses with the DC voltage pulses offset between phases to provide continuous power. FIGS. 6A and 6B schematically illustrate simplified examples of voltage and current in a two-phase and three-phase pulse power system, respectively.

Referring first to FIG. 6A, voltage for phase A is shown at 62a and voltage for phase B is shown at 62b. The continuous phase current is shown at 64. The pulse power for each phase comprises a plurality of voltage pulses defining alternating high voltage states and low voltage states. As shown in FIG. 6A, the voltage is switched between a pulse on-time (e.g., voltage>24 VDC, voltage≥60 VDC, voltage≥380) and a pulse off-time (e.g., voltage<12V, ≤24V). During pulse-on time, high voltage power is delivered and during pulse-off time while the high voltage power is off, a low voltage may be applied on each phase for use in low voltage sensing to check wire integrity, test capacitance in the cable, or any other testing or fault detection. The voltage pulses are offset between phases to provide continuous power.

In the three-phase system of FIG. 6B, voltage for phase A is shown at 65a, voltage for phase B is shown at 65b, and voltage for phase C is shown at 65c. The continuous phase current is shown at 66.

It is to be understood that the voltages, currents, and duty cycles shown in FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate simplified examples with idealized waveforms. In one or more embodiments, the voltage during off-time is greater than zero for use in fault detection, as previously noted. For example, the voltage during pulse-off time may comprise a low voltage to provide for fault sensing during pulse-off time. Fault sensing may include, for example, line-to-line fault detection with low voltage sensing of the cable or powered device and line-to-ground fault detection with midpoint grounding. These power safety features provide for safe system operation and installation and removal (disconnect) of devices.

In one or more embodiments, the pulse-on time is greater than the pulse-off time. For example, the high voltage may be pulsed on for 4 ms and off for 1 ms. In another example, the high voltage may be pulsed on for 8 ms and off for 4 ms. Also, the voltage pulse-on times may overlap between phases so that at least one wire is on at any time, as shown in FIG. 6B. During phase overlap in the multi-phase system, the total cable current is shared across all ON wires. When the phases are combined at the powered device, the result is continuous DC voltage as shown by the phase current 64 and 66. As described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 16/380,954, referenced above, the multi-phase system may comprise any number of phases, with any phase offset or overlap, or duty cycle.

FIG. 7 is a flowchart illustrating an overview of a process for integrating power sources and controlling power distribution in building power circuitry, in accordance with one embodiment. At step 70, AC power is received from a utility grid. Power is also received from renewable energy sources (e.g., solar panel, wind system, rechargeable battery) (step 71). The received power is integrated (step 72). For example, the AC power may be converted to DC power and input at a DC bus, as previously described. Available power is monitored and power is distributed (step 73). The power distribution may be controlled, for example, by turning off one or more low priority circuits if sufficient power is not available to meet all power demands. Power distribution may include, for example, transmitting AC power (step 74) and transmitting multi-phase DC pulse power (step 75) to power circuitry. As described above with respect to FIGS. 6A and 6B, fault detection may be performed on the multi-phase pulse power between high voltage pulses.

It is to be understood that the process shown in FIG. 7 and described above is only an example and steps may be added, modified, or combined without departing from the scope of the embodiments.

Although the apparatus and method have been described in accordance with the embodiments shown, one of ordinary skill in the art will readily recognize that there could be variations made to the embodiments without departing from the scope of the embodiments. Accordingly, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description and shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Claims

1. A power distribution system comprising:

a direct current (DC) power input for receiving DC power from a renewable energy source;
an alternating current (AC) power input for receiving AC power;
a multi-phase pulse power output for transmitting multi-phase pulse power;
an AC power output for transmitting the AC power; and
a controller for allocating power to the multi-phase pulse power output and the AC power output.

2. The power distribution system of claim 1 wherein the multi-phase pulse power and the AC power are delivered to power circuitry in a building for powering end devices and wherein data is delivered with the multi-phase pulse power to one or more of the end devices.

3. The power distribution system of claim 1 wherein the multi-phase pulse power is delivered to an outlet operable to deliver the multi-phase pulse power or PoE (Power over Ethernet).

4. The power distribution system of claim 1 further comprising an Ethernet power controller in communication with a DC bus receiving the DC power from the renewable energy source and from an AC to DC converter at the AC power input.

5. The power distribution system of claim 1 further comprising a controller operable to allocate output of the DC power to the multi-phase pulse power output based on a load requirement of end devices.

6. The power distribution system of claim 1 further comprising a controller operable to monitor power usage and turn off one or more low priority power circuits when power load exceeds available power.

7. The power distribution system of claim 6 wherein the controller is operable to turn off said one or more low priority power circuits when the power load exceeds power available from the renewable energy source.

8. The power distribution system of claim 1 wherein the DC power is integrated at a 380 VDC bus.

9. The power distribution system of claim 1 wherein the multi-phase pulse power comprises three-phase pulse power at a voltage greater than 56 volts DC.

10. The power distribution system of claim 1 wherein the renewable energy source comprises at least one of a solar panel, a wind turbine, and a rechargeable battery.

11. An apparatus comprising:

an alternating current (AC) circuit breaker;
a renewable energy circuit breaker;
a multi-phase pulse power circuit breaker; and
a switch coupled to the multi-phase pulse power circuit breaker and operable to provide circuit breaker control.

12. The apparatus of claim 11 further comprising a pulse power circuit breaker and an AC power breaker.

13. The apparatus of claim 11 further comprising a combined AC and multi-phase pulse power circuit breaker.

14. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein the switch comprises a PoE (Power over Ethernet) switch in communication with a power controller.

15. The apparatus of claim 14 wherein the PoE switch is operable to receive voltage and current information for multi-phase pulse power circuits and AC power circuits.

16. A method comprising:

receiving alternating current (AC) power;
receiving direct current (DC) power from a renewable energy source;
integrating the AC power and the DC power at a power distribution system;
monitoring available power and power load;
transmitting the AC power; and
transmitting multi-phase pulse power comprising a plurality of phases of pulse power, wherein the pulse power comprises a plurality of DC voltage pulses with the DC voltage pulses offset between phases to provide continuous power.

17. The method of claim 16 further comprising converting the received AC power to DC power for integration with the DC power from the renewable energy source.

18. The method of claim 16 wherein the DC voltage pulses are at 56 volts or greater voltage.

19. The method of claim 16 wherein the multi-phase pulse power comprises three or more phases of 380 VDC pulse power.

20. The method of claim 16 further comprising prioritizing delivery of the AC power or the multi-phase power to one or more power circuits.

21. The method of claim 16 further comprising performing fault detection between the DC voltage pulses of the multi-phase pulse power.

22. An apparatus comprising:

an input for receiving direct current (DC) power from a renewable energy source;
an output for transmitting multi-phase pulse power and PoE (Power over Ethernet); and
a controller for monitoring available power, identifying one or more low priority power circuits, and disabling said one or more low priority power circuits when a power load exceeds said available power.

23. The apparatus of claim 22 further comprising an input for receiving alternating current (AC) power and an output for transmitting the AC power, wherein said one or more low priority circuits are configured for receiving the multi-phase pulse power, the PoE, or the AC power.

24. The apparatus of claim 22 wherein the multi-phase pulse power comprises a plurality of phases of pulse power, the pulse power comprising a plurality of high voltage pulses with the high voltage pulses offset between phases to provide continuous power, and wherein a low voltage fault detection is performed between the high voltage pulses.

Patent History
Publication number: 20210226450
Type: Application
Filed: Jan 17, 2020
Publication Date: Jul 22, 2021
Applicant: CISCO TECHNOLOGY, INC. (San Jose, CA)
Inventors: Joel Richard Goergen (Soulsbyville, CA), Chad M. Jones (Doylestown, OH)
Application Number: 16/746,500
Classifications
International Classification: H02J 3/38 (20060101); H02J 13/00 (20060101); H04L 12/10 (20060101);