WIRELESS POWER TRANSMISSION WITH SELECTIVE RANGE

The present disclosure describes a methodology for wireless power transmission based on pocket-forming. This methodology may include one transmitter and at least one or more receivers, being the transmitter the source of energy and the receiver the device that is desired to charge or power. The transmitter may identify and locate the device to which the receiver is connected and thereafter aim pockets of energy to the device in order to power it. Pockets of energy may be generated through constructive and destructive interferences, which may create null-spaces and spots of pockets of energy ranged into one or more radii from transmitter. Such feature may enable wireless power transmission through a selective range, which may limit operation area of electronic devices and/or may avoid formation of pockets of energy near and/or over certain areas, objects and people.

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Description

CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation of Non-Provisional Patent Application No. 13/926,020, filed Jun. 25, 2013, entitled Wireless Power Transmission with Selective Range, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.

This application is related to Non-Provisional Patent Application No. 13/891,430, filed May 10, 2013, entitled Methodology for Pocket-Forming, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.

FIELD OF INVENTION

The present disclosure relates to electronic transmitters, and more particularly to transmitters for wireless power transmission.

BACKGROUND

Electronic devices such as laptop computers, smartphones, portable gaming devices, tablets and so forth may require power for performing their intended functions. This may require having to charge electronic equipment at least once a day, or in high-demand electronic devices more than once a day. Such an activity may be tedious and may represent a burden to users. For example, a user may be required to carry chargers in case his electronic equipment is lacking power. In addition, users have to find available power sources to connect to. Lastly, users must plug into a wall or other power supply to be able to charge his or her electronic device. However, such an activity may render electronic devices inoperable during charging. Current solutions to this problem may include inductive pads which may employ magnetic induction or resonating coils. Nevertheless, such a solution may still require electronic devices to be placed in a specific place for powering. Thus, electronic devices during charging may not be portable. For the foregoing reasons, there is a need for a wireless power transmission system where electronic devices may be powered without requiring extra chargers or plugs, and where the mobility and portability of electronic devices may not be compromised.

SUMMARY

The present disclosure provides various transmitter arrangements which can be utilized for wireless power transmission using suitable techniques such as pocket-forming. Transmitters may be employed for sending Radio frequency (RF) signals to electronic devices which may incorporate receivers. Such receivers may convert RF signals into suitable electricity for powering and charging a plurality of electric devices. Wireless power transmission allows powering and charging a plurality of electrical devices without wires.

A transmitter including at least two antenna elements may generate RF signals through the use of one or more Radio frequency integrated circuit (MC) which may be managed by one or more microcontrollers. Transmitters may receive power from a power source, which may provide enough electricity for a subsequent conversion to RF signal.

Wireless power transmission with selective range may be employed for charging or powering a plurality of electronic devices in a variety of spots into a variety of ranges. Such spots may be surrounded by null-spaces where no pockets of energy are generated. Thus, wireless power transmission may be used in applications where pockets of energy are not desired. Such applications may include sensitive equipment to pocket-forming or pockets of energy, as well as people who do not want pockets of energy near or over them. Furthermore, wireless power transmission with selective range may increase control over devices which receive charge or power. Such control may be applied for limiting the operation area of certain equipment, such as, exhibition cellphones, exhibition tablets and any other suitable device that may be required to operate into a limited zone.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Non-limiting embodiments of the present disclosure are described by way of example with reference to the accompanying figures which are schematic and may not be drawn to scale. Unless indicated as representing the background art, the figures represent aspects of the disclosure.

FIG. 1 illustrates a wireless power transmission example situation using pocket-forming.

FIG. 2A and 2B illustrate waveforms for wireless power transmission with selective range, which may get unified in single waveform.

FIG. 3 illustrates wireless power transmission with selective range, where a plurality of pockets of energy may be generated along various radii from transmitter.

FIG. 4 illustrates wireless power transmission with selective range, where a plurality of pockets of energy may be generated along various radii from transmitter.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

“Pocket-forming” may refer to generating two or more RF waves which converge in 3-d space, forming controlled constructive and destructive interference patterns.

“Pockets of energy” may refer to areas or regions of space where energy or power may accumulate in the form of constructive interference patterns of RF waves.

“Null-space” may refer to areas or regions of space where pockets of energy do not form because of destructive interference patterns of RF waves.

“Transmitter” may refer to a device, including a chip which may generate two or more RF signals, at least one RF signal being phase shifted and gain adjusted with respect to other RF signals, substantially all of which pass through one or more RF antenna such that focused RF signals are directed to a target.

“Receiver” may refer to a device including at least one antenna element, at least one rectifying circuit and at least one power converter, which may utilize pockets of energy for powering, or charging an electronic device.

“Adaptive pocket-forming” may refer to dynamically adjusting pocket-forming to regulate power on one or more targeted receivers.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In the following detailed description, reference is made to the accompanying drawings, which form a part hereof. In the drawings, which are not to scale or to proportion, similar symbols typically identify similar components, unless context dictates otherwise. The illustrative embodiments described in the detailed description, drawings and claims, are not meant to be limiting. Other embodiments may be used and/or and other changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the present disclosure.

FIG. 1 illustrates wireless power transmission 100 using pocket-forming. A transmitter 102 may transmit controlled Radio RF waves 104 which may converge in 3-d space. These Radio frequencies (RF) waves may be controlled through phase and/or relative amplitude adjustments to form constructive and destructive interference patterns (pocket-forming). Pockets of energy 108 may be formed at constructive interference patterns and can be 3-dimensional in shape whereas null-spaces may be generated at destructive interference patterns. A receiver 106 may then utilize pockets of energy 108 produced by pocket-forming for charging or powering an electronic device, for example a laptop computer 110 and thus effectively providing wireless power transmission. In other situations there can be multiple transmitters 102 and/or multiple receivers 106 for powering various electronic equipment; for example smartphones, tablets, music players, toys, and others at the same time. In other embodiments, adaptive pocket-forming may be used to regulate power on electronic devices.

FIG. 2A and 2B depict a wireless power transmission principle 200, where two waveforms, for example waveform 202 and waveform 204, as depicted in FIG. 2A may result in a unified waveform 206 as depicted in FIG. 2B. Such unified waveform 206 may be generated by constructive and destructive interference patterns between waveform 202 and waveform 204.

As depicted in FIG. 2A, at least two waveforms with slightly different frequencies such as waveform 202 and waveform 204 may be generated at 5.7 Gigahertz (GHz) and 5.8 GHz respectively. By changing the phase on one or both frequencies using suitable techniques such as pocket-forming, constructive and destructive interferences patterns may result in unified waveform 206. Unified waveform 206 may describe pockets of energy 108 and null-spaces along pocket-forming, such pockets of energy 108 may be available in certain areas where a constructive interference exists; such areas may include one or more spots which may move along pocket-forming trajectory and may be contained into wireless power range 208 X2. Wireless power range 208 X2 may include a minimum range and a maximum range of wireless power transmission 100, which may range from a few centimeters to over hundreds of meters. In addition, unified waveforms 206 may include several null-spaces, which may be available in certain areas where a destructive interference exists, such areas may include one or more null-spaces which may move along pocket-forming trajectory and may be contained into wireless power range 210 X1. Wireless power range 210 X1 may include a minimum range and a maximum range of wireless power transmission 100, which may range from a few centimeters to over hundreds of meters.

FIG. 3 depicts wireless power transmission with selective range 300, where a transmitter 302 may produce pocket-forming for a plurality of receivers 308. Transmitter 302 may generate pocket-forming through wireless power transmission with selective range 300, which may include one or more wireless charging radii 304 and one or more radii of null-space 306. A plurality of electronic devices may be charged or powered in wireless charging radii 304. Thus, several spots of energy may be created, such spots may be employed for enabling restrictions for powering and charging electronic devices, such restrictions may include: Operation of specific electronics in a specific or limited spot contained in wireless charging radii 304. Furthermore, safety restrictions may be implemented by the use of wireless power transmission with selective range 300, such safety restrictions may avoid pockets of energy 108 over areas or zones where energy needs to be avoided, such areas may include areas including sensitive equipment to pockets of energy 108 and/or people who do not want pockets of energy 108 over and/or near them.

FIG. 4 depicts wireless power transmission with selective range 400, where a transmitter 402 may produce pocket-forming for a plurality of receivers 406. Transmitter 402 may generate pocket-forming through wireless power transmission with selective range 400, which may include one or more wireless charging spots 404. A plurality of electronic devices may be charged or powered in wireless charging spots 404. Pockets of energy 108 may be generated over a plurality of receivers 406 regardless the obstacles 408 surrounding them, such effect may be produced because destructive interference may be generated in zones or areas where obstacles 408 are present. Therefore, pockets of energy 108 may be generated through constructive interference in wireless charging spots 404. Location of pockets of energy 108 may be performed by tacking receivers 406 and by enabling a plurality of communication protocols by a variety of communication systems such as, Bluetooth technology, infrared communication, WI-FI, FM radio among others.

While various aspects and embodiments have been disclosed herein, other aspects and embodiments may be contemplated. The various aspects and embodiments disclosed herein are for purposes of illustration and are not intended to be limiting, with the true scope and spirit being indicated by the following claims.

Claims

1. A method for wireless power transmission comprising:

generating, by a transmitter, radio frequency (RF) waves through an antenna connected to the transmitter;
defining, by the transmitter, a region of space to form a pocket of energy for charging or powering an electronic device, wherein defining the region of space comprises selecting a range of distance from the transmitter for the pocket of energy;
directing, by the transmitter, the RF waves to accumulate in the region of space in a form of constructive interference patterns; and
generating, by the transmitter, a null-space in a form of destructive interference patterns of the generated RF waves outside of the selected range from the transmitter.

2. The method according to claim 1, wherein the null-space is formed at an obstacle proximate to the electronic device.

3. The method according to claim 1, wherein the transmitter is configured to communicate using one of a plurality of standard wireless communication protocols of Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, FM, or Zigbee.

4. A system for wireless power transmission comprising:

a transmitter configured for generating radio frequency (RF) waves through an antenna connected to the transmitter;
a micro-controller within the transmitter configured to control the RF waves to direct the RF waves to accumulate as a pocket of energy in a region of space in a form of constructive interference patterns of the generated RF waves, thereby selecting a range from the transmitter configured for charging or powering an electronic device in the region of space having the pocket of energy, and
the micro-controller further configured to generate a null-space in the form of destructive interference patterns of the generated RF waves outside of the selected range.

5. The system according to claim 4, wherein the antennas are configured to operate in a frequency band of generally 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, or 5.7 GHz.

6. The system according to claim 4, further comprising a receiver connected to the electronic device and having a micro-controller configured to communicate with the transmitter micro-controller to generate the pocket of energy for the receiver.

7. The system according to claim 4, wherein the micro-controller is configured to direct the RF waves to accumulate as the pocket of energy proximate to a receiver regardless of any obstacles proximate to the receiver.

8. The system according to claim 4, wherein the micro-controller is configured to direct the RF waves to form a null-space at an obstacle proximate to the receiver.

9. The system according to claim 4, wherein the micro-controller for the transmitter is configured to communicate using one of a plurality of standard wireless communication protocols of Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, FM, or Zigbee.

10. A system for wireless power transmission comprising:

a transmitter configured for generating at least two radio frequency (RF) waves and short RF control signals, the transmitter comprising: at least two RF antennas configured to transmit at least two RF waves through the antennas converging in 3-d space to accumulate as a pocket of energy in the form of constructive interference patterns of RF waves; a micro-controller configured for controlling constructive interference patterns of the RF waves to accumulate the pocket of energy in a predetermined areas or region in 3-D space and for controlling the destructive interference patterns of the RF waves to form a null-space; and
wherein the constructive interference patterns of RF waves form the pocket of energy within a range from the transmitter for charging or powering the electronic device and wherein the destructive interference patterns of RF waves form the null-space outside of the range.

11. The system according to claim 10, wherein the null-space is configured as a zone where RF waves do not accumulate to form the pocket of energy.

12. The system according to claim 10, wherein the null-space is formed in a region having sensitive equipment or people.

13. The system according to claim 10, further comprising a receiver connected to the portable electronic device having a micro-controller configured to communicate with the transmitter micro-controller to generate the pocket of energy.

14. The system according to claim 10, wherein the micro-controller for the transmitter is configured to communicate using one of a plurality of standard wireless communication protocols of Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, FM, or Zigbee.

15. The system according to claim 10, wherein the antennas are configured to operate in a frequency band of generally 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, or 5.7 GHz.

16. The system according to claim 10, wherein the micro-controller of the transmitter is configured to dynamically adjust pocket-forming for a plurality of ranges to regulate power for one or more targeted receivers.

17. The system according to claim 13, wherein the receiver and transmitter micro-controllers are configured to communicate to change frequencies and phase on one or more RF waves to form an unified waveform that forms pockets of energy and null-spaces along pocket-forming, wherein pockets of energy are available in certain predetermined areas where a constructive interference of the waves exist.

18. The system according to claim 10, wherein the electronic device is selected from the group consisting of a smartphone, tablet, music player, computer, and toy.

19. The system according to claim 10, wherein more than one electronic device is powered at the same time in a different range for each electronic device.

20. The system according to claim 10, wherein the antennas are configured to operate in predetermined frequencies at generally 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, or 5.7 GHz, to transmit at least two RF waveforms to create a unified waveform for the range for the pocket of energy.

Patent History

Publication number: 20170170665
Type: Application
Filed: Jul 20, 2015
Publication Date: Jun 15, 2017
Inventors: Michael A. Leabman (San Ramon, CA), Gregory Scott Brewer (Livermore, CA)
Application Number: 14/803,672

Classifications

International Classification: H02J 5/00 (20060101); H02J 7/02 (20060101);