Patents Assigned to University of Massachusetts Medical Center
  • Patent number: 10870886
    Abstract: The present invention includes methods of determining whether an individual in need thereof has, or is at risk of developing, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).
    Type: Grant
    Filed: October 7, 2015
    Date of Patent: December 22, 2020
    Assignee: University of Massachusetts Medical Center
    Inventors: Peter L. Jones, Takako Jones, Johnny Salameh, Colin Quinn, Oliver D. King
  • Patent number: 7850956
    Abstract: This invention relates to a method of immunizing a vertebrate, comprising introducing into the vertebrate a DNA transcription unit which comprises DNA encoding a desired antigen or antigens. The uptake of the DNA transcription unit by a host vertebrate results in the expression of the desired antigen or antigens, thereby eliciting humoral or cell-mediated immune responses or both humoral and cell-mediated responses. The elicited humoral and cell-mediated immune response can provide protection against infection by pathogenic agents, provide an anti-tumor response, or provide contraception. The host can be any vertebrate, avian or mammal, including humans.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: January 22, 2004
    Date of Patent: December 14, 2010
    Assignees: University of Massachusetts Medical Center, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
    Inventors: Harriet L. Robinson, Ellen F. Fynan, Robert G. Webster, Shan Lu
  • Patent number: 7722874
    Abstract: Methods for inducing antigen-specific T cell tolerance are disclosed. The methods involve contacting a T cell with: 1) a cell which presents antigen to the T cell, wherein a ligand on the cell interacts with a receptor on the surface of the T cell which mediates contact-dependent helper effector function; and 2) an antagonist of the receptor on the surface of the T cell which inhibits interaction of the ligand on the antigen presenting cell with the receptor on the T cell. In a preferred embodiment, the cell which presents antigen to the T cell is a B cell and the receptor on the surface of the T cell which mediates contact-dependent helper effector function is gp39. Preferably, the antagonist is an anti-gp39 antibody or a soluble gp39 ligand (e.g., soluble CD40). The methods of the invention can be used to induce T cell tolerance to a soluble antigen or to an allogeneic cell.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: October 1, 1998
    Date of Patent: May 25, 2010
    Assignees: Trustees of Dartmouth College, University of Massachusetts Medical Center
    Inventors: Randolph J. Noelle, Teresa M. Foy, Fiona H. Durie
  • Publication number: 20090186843
    Abstract: The present invention relates to a Drosophila in vitro system which was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides (nt) in length. Furthermore, when these 21-23 nt fragments are purified and added back to Drosophila extracts, they mediate RNA interference in the absence of long dsRNA. Thus, these 21-23 nt fragments are the sequence-specific mediators of RNA degradation. A molecular signal, which may be their specific length, must be present in these 21-23 nt fragments to recruit cellular factors involved in RNAi. This present invention encompasses these 21-23 nt fragments and their use for specifically inactivating gene function. The use of these fragments (or chemically synthesized oligonucleotides of the same or similar nature) enables the targeting of specific mRNAs for degradation in mammalian cells, where the use of long dsRNAs to elicit RNAi is usually not practical, presumably because of the deleterious effects of the interferon response.
    Type: Application
    Filed: July 19, 2007
    Publication date: July 23, 2009
    Applicants: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Forderung der Wissenschaften E.V.
    Inventors: Thomas Tuschl, Phillip D. Zamore, Phillip A. Sharp, David P. Bartel
  • Publication number: 20080299603
    Abstract: The present invention relates to an in vitro method for determining the ability of a vaccine composition which comprises one or more antigens or a nucleic acid molecule which encodes one or more antigens to stimulate a T cell response.
    Type: Application
    Filed: May 21, 2008
    Publication date: December 4, 2008
    Applicant: University of Massachusetts Medical Center
    Inventor: Francis A. Ennis
  • Publication number: 20080199967
    Abstract: The present invention describes a novel, simplified method for detecting and monitoring the presence of nitrosylated proteins, such as S-nitrosoproteins, in a biological sample using fluorescence detection. The present invention further describes a method which can both quantify and identify the nature of nitrosylated proteins, which method is useful for monitoring both normal and disease states, in the development and screening of potential therapeutic drug species.
    Type: Application
    Filed: January 17, 2008
    Publication date: August 21, 2008
    Applicants: UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA PATENT FOUNDATION
    Inventors: Joan Mannick, Benjamin Gaston, Barbara Leinweber
  • Publication number: 20080193382
    Abstract: Described are methods and compositions that inhibit IL-1 signalling for the treatment of acute inflammatory response to cell necrosis, and the attendant collateral tissue damage.
    Type: Application
    Filed: November 9, 2007
    Publication date: August 14, 2008
    Applicant: UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL CENTER
    Inventors: Kenneth L. Rock, Chun-Jen Chen
  • Publication number: 20080171693
    Abstract: Disclosed herein are compounds that inhibit Hsp90 interactions with IAP proteins, such as Survivin, XIAP, cIAP1, or cIAP2, and methods for identifying and using such compounds.
    Type: Application
    Filed: February 19, 2008
    Publication date: July 17, 2008
    Applicant: UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL CENTER
    Inventors: Dario C. Altieri, Janet Plescia, Whitney Salz
  • Patent number: 7387882
    Abstract: The present invention relates to an in vitro method for determining the ability of a vaccine composition which comprises one or more antigens or a nucleic acid molecule which encodes one or more antigens to stimulate a T cell response.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: May 13, 2005
    Date of Patent: June 17, 2008
    Assignee: University of Massachusetts Medical Center
    Inventor: Francis A. Ennis
  • Publication number: 20080132461
    Abstract: The present invention relates to a Drosophila in vitro system which was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides (nt) in length. Furthermore, when these 21-23 nt fragments are purified and added back to Drosophila extracts, they mediate RNA interference in the absence of long dsRNA. Thus, these 21-23 nt fragments are the sequence-specific mediators of RNA degradation. A molecular signal, which may be their specific length, must be present in these 21-23 nt fragments to recruit cellular factors involved in RNAi. This present invention encompasses these 21-23 nt fragments and their use for specifically inactivating gene function. The use of these fragments (or chemically synthesized oligonucleotides of the same or similar nature) enables the targeting of specific mRNAs for degradation in mammalian cells, where the use of long dsRNAs to elicit RNAi is usually not practical, presumably because of the deleterious effects of the interferon response.
    Type: Application
    Filed: July 19, 2007
    Publication date: June 5, 2008
    Applicants: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Forderung der
    Inventors: Thomas Tuschi, Phillip D. Zamore, Phillip A. Sharp, David P. Bartel
  • Patent number: 7330531
    Abstract: A system for spectroscopic imaging of bodily tissue in which a scintillation screen and a charged coupled device (CCD) are used to accurately image selected tissue. Applications include the imaging of radionuclide distributions within the human body or the use of a dual energy source to provide a dual photon bone densitometry apparatus that uses stationary or scanning acquisition techniques. An x-ray source generates x-rays which pass through a region of a subject's body, forming an x-ray image which reaches the scintillation screen. The scintillation screen reradiates a spatial intensity pattern corresponding to the image, the pattern being detected by a CCD sensor. The image is digitized by the sensor and processed by a controller before being stored as an electronic image. A dual energy x-ray source that delivers two different energy levels provides quantitative information regarding the object being imaged using dual photon absorptiometry techniques.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: May 11, 1995
    Date of Patent: February 12, 2008
    Assignee: University of Massachusetts Medical Center
    Inventor: Andrew Karellas
  • Publication number: 20070003963
    Abstract: The present invention relates to a Drosophila in vitro system which was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides (nt) in length. Furthermore, when these 21-23 nt fragments are purified and added back to Drosophila extracts, they mediate RNA interference in the absence of long dsRNA. Thus, these 21-23 nt fragments are the sequence-specific mediators of RNA degradation. A molecular signal, which may be their specific length, must be present in these 21-23 nt fragments to recruit cellular factors involved in RNAi. This present invention encompasses these 21-23 nt fragments and their use for specifically inactivating gene finction. The use of these fragments (or chemically synthesized oligonucleotides of the same or similar nature) enables the targeting of specific mRNAs for degradation in mammalian cells, where the use of long dsRNAs to elicit RNAi is usually not practical, presumably because of the deleterious effects of the interferon response.
    Type: Application
    Filed: June 26, 2006
    Publication date: January 4, 2007
    Applicants: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Forderug der Wissenschaften E.V.
    Inventors: Thomas Tuschl, Phillip Zamore, Phillip Sharp, David Bartel
  • Publication number: 20070003960
    Abstract: The present invention relates to a Drosophila in vitro system which was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides (nt) in length. Furthermore, when these 21-23 nt fragments are purified and added back to Drosophila extracts, they mediate RNA interference in the absence of long dsRNA. Thus, these 21-23 nt fragments are the sequence-specific mediators of RNA degradation. A molecular signal, which may be their specific length, must be present in these 21-23 nt fragments to recruit cellular factors involved in RNAi. This present invention encompasses these 21-23 nt fragments and their use for specifically inactivating gene function. The use of these fragments (or chemically synthesized oligonucleotides of the same or similar nature) enables the targeting of specific mRNAs for degradation in mammalian cells, where the use of long dsRNAs to elicit RNAi is usually not practical, presumably because of the deleterious effects of the interferon response.
    Type: Application
    Filed: June 26, 2006
    Publication date: January 4, 2007
    Applicants: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Forderug der Wissenschaften E.V.
    Inventors: Thomas Tuschl, Phillip Zamore, Phillip Sharp, David Bartel
  • Publication number: 20070003962
    Abstract: The present invention relates to a Drosophila in vitro system which was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides (nt) in length. Furthermore, when these 21-23 nt fragments are purified and added back to Drosophila extracts, they mediate RNA interference in the absence of long dsRNA. Thus, these 21-23 nt fragments are the sequence-specific mediators of RNA degradation. A molecular signal, which may be their specific length, must be present in these 21-23 nt fragments to recruit cellular factors involved in RNAi. This present invention encompasses these 21-23 nt fragments and their use for specifically inactivating gene function. The use of these fragments (or chemically synthesized oligonucleotides of the same or similar nature) enables the targeting of specific mRNAs for degradation in mammalian cells, where the use of long dsRNAs to elicit RNAi is usually not practical, presumably because of the deleterious effects of the interferon response.
    Type: Application
    Filed: June 26, 2006
    Publication date: January 4, 2007
    Applicants: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Forderug der Wissenschaften E. V.
    Inventors: Thomas Tuschl, Phillip Zamore, Phillip Sharp, David Bartel
  • Publication number: 20070003961
    Abstract: The present invention relates to a Drosophila in vitro system which was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides (nt) in length. Furthermore, when these 21-23 nt fragments are purified and added back to Drosophila extracts, they mediate RNA interference in the absence of long dsRNA. Thus, these 21-23 nt fragments are the sequence-specific mediators of RNA degradation. A molecular signal, which may be their specific length, must be present in these 21-23 nt fragments to recruit cellular factors involved in RNAi. This present invention encompasses these 21-23 nt fragments and their use for specifically inactivating gene function. The use of these fragments (or chemically synthesized oligonucleotides of the same or similar nature) enables the targeting of specific mRNAs for degradation in mammalian cells, where the use of long dsRNAs to elicit RNAi is usually not practical, presumably because of the deleterious effects of the interferon response.
    Type: Application
    Filed: June 26, 2006
    Publication date: January 4, 2007
    Applicants: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Forderug der Wissenschaften E.V.
    Inventors: Thomas Tuschl, Phillip Zamore, Phillip Sharp, David Bartel
  • Publication number: 20050277109
    Abstract: The present invention relates to an in vitro method for determining the ability of a vaccine composition which comprises one or more antigens or a nucleic acid molecule which encodes one or more antigens to stimulate a T cell response.
    Type: Application
    Filed: May 13, 2005
    Publication date: December 15, 2005
    Applicant: University of Massachusetts Medical Center
    Inventor: Francis Ennis
  • Patent number: 6962790
    Abstract: The present invention relates to an in vitro method for determining the ability of a vaccine composition which comprises one or more antigens or a nucleic acid molecule which encodes one or more antigens to stimulate a T cell response.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 23, 1998
    Date of Patent: November 8, 2005
    Assignee: University of Massachusetts Medical Center
    Inventor: Francis A. Ennis
  • Publication number: 20050152897
    Abstract: Methods for inducing T cell tolerance to a tissue or organ graft in a transplant recipeint are disclosed. The methods involve administering to a subject: 1) an allogeneic or xenogeneic cell which expresses donor antigens and which has a ligand on the cell surface which interacts with a receptor on the surface of a recipient T cell which mediates contact-dependent helper effector function; and 2) an antagonist of the receptor which inhibits interaction of the ligand with the receptor. In a preferred embodiment, the allogeneic or xenogeneic cell is a B cell, preferably a resting B cell, and the molecule on the surface of the T cell which mediates contact-dependent helper effector function is gp39. A preferred gp39 antagonist is an anti-gp39 antibody. The allogeneic or xenogeneic cell and the gp39 antagonist are typically administered to a transplant recipient prior to transplantation of the tissue or organ.
    Type: Application
    Filed: October 7, 2004
    Publication date: July 14, 2005
    Applicants: Trustees of Dartmouth College, University of Massachusetts Medical Center
    Inventors: Randolph Noelle, Fiona Durie, David Parker, Michael Appel, Nancy Phillips, John Mordes, Dale Grenier, Aldo Rossini
  • Publication number: 20050129703
    Abstract: The present invention relates to the identification of gene sequences and proteins involved in vaccinia virus dominant T cell epitopes. Two vaccinia virus CD8+ T cell epitopes restricted by the most common human MHC class I allele, HLA-A0201 have been identified. Both epitopes are highly conserved in vaccinia and variola viruses. The induction of the T cell responses following primary vaccination is demonstrated by the kinetics of epitope specific CD8+ T cells in 3 HLA-A0201 individuals. This information will be useful for the design and analyses of the immunogenicity of experimental vaccinia vaccines, and for basic studies of human T cell memory.
    Type: Application
    Filed: January 26, 2004
    Publication date: June 16, 2005
    Applicant: University of Massachusetts Medical Center
    Inventors: Masanori Terajima, John Cruz, Francis Ennis
  • Patent number: 6895077
    Abstract: A system for x-ray fluoroscopic imaging of bodily tissue in which a scintillation screen and a charge coupled device (CCD) is used to accurately image selected tissue. An x-ray source generates x-rays which pass through a region of a subject's body, forming an x-ray image which reaches the scintillation screen. The scintillation screen re-radiates a spatial intensity pattern corresponding to the image, the pattern being detected by the CCD sensor. In a preferred embodiment the imager uses four 8×8-cm three-side buttable CCDs coupled to a CsI:T1 scintillator by straight (non-tapering) fiberoptics and tiled to achieve a field of view (FOV) of 16×16-cm at the image plane. Larger FOVs can be achieved by tiling more CCDs in a similar manner. The imaging system can be operated in a plurality of pixel pitch modes such as 78, 156 or 234-?m pixel pitch modes. The CCD sensor may also provide multi-resolution imaging.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: November 21, 2001
    Date of Patent: May 17, 2005
    Assignee: University of Massachusetts Medical Center
    Inventors: Andrew Karellas, Srinivasan Vedantham, Sankararaman Suryanarayanan