Patents by Inventor Bruce D. Marsh

Bruce D. Marsh has filed for patents to protect the following inventions. This listing includes patent applications that are pending as well as patents that have already been granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

  • Publication number: 20210348804
    Abstract: An embodiment in accordance with the present invention includes an EGS configured to allow the commercial production of electrical energy. One criteria of an EGS according to the present invention is that the temperature and volume of the fluids extracted are sufficiently high and large enough as to allow the commercial production of electrical energy. The system is able to operate for at least N years before the extracted fluid falls below the minimum temperature needed for energy production. Additionally, fractures are separated from each other by a sufficiently large volume of rock (Vcrit) relative to the fractures surface area such that the ratio of the rate of heat extraction to the rate of heat supply controlled by the thermal conductivity of the rock is such that the intervening rock is cooled at a rate that is sufficiently slow to be economic.
    Type: Application
    Filed: July 21, 2021
    Publication date: November 11, 2021
    Applicant: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Bruce D. MARSH, Markus HILPERT, Peter Anderson GEISER
  • Patent number: 11125471
    Abstract: An embodiment in accordance with the present invention includes an EGS configured to allow the commercial production of electrical energy. One criteria of an EGS according to the present invention is that the temperature and volume of the fluids extracted are sufficiently high and large enough as to allow the commercial production of electrical energy. The system is able to operate for at least N years before the extracted fluid falls below the minimum temperature needed for energy production. Additionally, fractures are separated from each other by a sufficiently large volume of rock (Vcrit) relative to the fractures surface area such that the ratio of the rate of heat extraction to the rate of heat supply controlled by the thermal conductivity of the rock is such that the intervening rock is cooled at a rate that is sufficiently slow to be economic.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: June 4, 2015
    Date of Patent: September 21, 2021
    Assignee: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Bruce D. Marsh, Markus Hilpert, Peter Anderson Geiser
  • Patent number: 11098565
    Abstract: An embodiment in accordance with the present invention includes a method for estimating the permeability of fractured rock formations from the analysis of a slow fluid pressure wave, which is generated by pressurization of a borehole. Wave propagation in the rock is recorded with TFI™. Poroelastic theory is used to estimate the permeability from the measured wave speed. The present invention offers the opportunity of measuring the reservoir-scale permeability of fractured rock, because the method relies on imaging a wave, which propagates through a large rock volume, on the order of kilometers in size. Traditional methods yield permeability for much smaller rock volumes: well logging tools only measure permeability in the vicinity of a borehole. Pressure transient testing accesses larger rock volumes; however, these volumes are much smaller than for the proposed method, particularly in low-permeability rock formations.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: December 3, 2018
    Date of Patent: August 24, 2021
    Assignee: The John Hopkins University
    Inventors: Markus Hilpert, Peter Anderson Geiser, Bruce D. Marsh
  • Patent number: 10907460
    Abstract: An energetic charge for propellant fracturing may include a propellant material or a shape of the energetic charge being selected such that a rise time of a deflagration of the energetic charge is determined to be in the propellant fracturing regime. The propellant fracturing regime may be defined by a set of linear equations associated with the rise time for pressure from the deflagration of the energetic charge. The rise time may be calculated based on an equation {dot over (?)}=(dP/dt)/E, where {dot over (?)} represents a strain rate, dP/dt represents a change in pressure with respect to time, and E is Young's modulus, and where the set of linear equations relate the rise time to a borehole diameter.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: February 12, 2018
    Date of Patent: February 2, 2021
    Assignee: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventor: Bruce D. Marsh
  • Publication number: 20200124324
    Abstract: A radiator (RAD) enhanced geothermal system (EGS) may comprise a radiator vane heat exchanger (RVHE). The RVHE may be configured to be located in a plane defined by an injector well and a production well that is defined by a principal stress direction (S1) of a plurality of principal stress directions and a maximum horizontal stress component (SHmax). The RVHE may include one or more stacked laterals oriented along SHmax. Each stacked lateral, of the one or more stacked laterals, may include one or more vertical branches oriented along Si. The RVHE may be configured to extract energy from a non-hydrothermal source of energy.
    Type: Application
    Filed: March 23, 2018
    Publication date: April 23, 2020
    Applicant: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Peter Anderson GEISER, Bruce D. MARSH
  • Publication number: 20190249533
    Abstract: An energetic charge for propellant fracturing may include a propellant material or a shape of the energetic charge being selected such that a rise time of a deflagration of the energetic charge is determined to be in the propellant fracturing regime. The propellant fracturing regime may be defined by a set of linear equations associated with the rise time for pressure from the deflagration of the energetic charge. The rise time may be calculated based on an equation {dot over (?)}=(dP/dt)/E, where {dot over (?)} represents a strain rate, dP/dt represents a change in pressure with respect to time, and E is Young's modulus, and where the set of linear equations relate the rise time to a borehole diameter.
    Type: Application
    Filed: February 12, 2018
    Publication date: August 15, 2019
    Inventor: Bruce D. MARSH
  • Publication number: 20190178070
    Abstract: An embodiment in accordance with the present invention includes a method for estimating the permeability of fractured rock formations from the analysis of a slow fluid pressure wave, which is generated by pressurization of a borehole. Wave propagation in the rock is recorded with TFI™. Poroelastic theory is used to estimate the permeability from the measured wave speed. The present invention offers the opportunity of measuring the reservoir-scale permeability of fractured rock, because the method relies on imaging a wave, which propagates through a large rock volume, on the order of kilometers in size. Traditional methods yield permeability for much smaller rock volumes: well logging tools only measure permeability in the vicinity of a borehole. Pressure transient testing accesses larger rock volumes; however, these volumes are much smaller than for the proposed method, particularly in low-permeability rock formations.
    Type: Application
    Filed: December 3, 2018
    Publication date: June 13, 2019
    Inventors: Markus Hilpert, Peter Anderson Geiser, Bruce D. Marsh
  • Patent number: 10145227
    Abstract: An embodiment in accordance with the present invention includes a method for estimating the permeability of fractured rock formations from the analysis of a slow fluid pressure wave, which is generated by pressurization of a borehole. Wave propagation in the rock is recorded with TFI™. Poroelastic theory is used to estimate the permeability from the measured wave speed. The present invention offers the opportunity of measuring the reservoir-scale permeability of fractured rock, because the method relies on imaging a wave, which propagates through a large rock volume, on the order of kilometers in size. Traditional methods yield permeability for much smaller rock volumes: well logging tools only measure permeability in the vicinity of a borehole. Pressure transient testing accesses larger rock volumes; however, these volumes are much smaller than for the proposed method, particularly in low-permeability rock formations.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: July 29, 2016
    Date of Patent: December 4, 2018
    Assignee: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Markus Hilpert, Peter Anderson Geiser, Bruce D. Marsh
  • Publication number: 20170031048
    Abstract: An embodiment in accordance with the present invention includes a method for estimating the permeability of fractured rock formations from the analysis of a slow fluid pressure wave, which is generated by pressurization of a borehole. Wave propagation in the rock is recorded with TFI™. Poroelastic theory is used to estimate the permeability from the measured wave speed. The present invention offers the opportunity of measuring the reservoir-scale permeability of fractured rock, because the method relies on imaging a wave, which propagates through a large rock volume, on the order of kilometers in size. Traditional methods yield permeability for much smaller rock volumes: well logging tools only measure permeability in the vicinity of a borehole. Pressure transient testing accesses larger rock volumes; however, these volumes are much smaller than for the proposed method, particularly in low-permeability rock formations.
    Type: Application
    Filed: July 29, 2016
    Publication date: February 2, 2017
    Inventors: Markus Hilpert, Peter Anderson Geiser, Bruce D. Marsh
  • Publication number: 20150354859
    Abstract: An embodiment in accordance with the present invention includes an EGS configured to allow the commercial production of electrical energy. One criteria of an EGS according to the present invention is that the temperature and volume of the fluids extracted are sufficiently high and large enough as to allow the commercial production of electrical energy. The system is able to operate for at least N years before the extracted fluid falls below the minimum temperature needed for energy production. Additionally, fractures are separated from each other by a sufficiently large volume of rock (Vcrit) relative to the fractures surface area such that the ratio of the rate of heat extraction to the rate of heat supply controlled by the thermal conductivity of the rock is such that the intervening rock is cooled at a rate that is sufficiently slow to be economic.
    Type: Application
    Filed: June 4, 2015
    Publication date: December 10, 2015
    Inventors: Bruce D. Marsh, Markus Hilpert, Peter Anderson Geiser