Patents by Inventor Craig Christopher Leong

Craig Christopher Leong has filed for patents to protect the following inventions. This listing includes patent applications that are pending as well as patents that have already been granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

  • Publication number: 20160103530
    Abstract: A two-layer cover with a compressible layer separating first and second layers. In some cases, capacitive sensing between the first and second layers can determine both touch locations and applied force.
    Type: Application
    Filed: December 17, 2015
    Publication date: April 14, 2016
    Inventors: Omar Sze Leung, Jonah A. Harley, James E. Wright, Craig Christopher Leong, Kristina A. Babiarz
  • Publication number: 20140085213
    Abstract: A force sensor incorporated into a touch device, measuring deflection in a device stack, including compressible elements disposed between the device stack and the frame element. When the device stack is deformed, applied force is measured using the compressible elements, using capacitive sensing or strain measurements. The force sensitive sensor provides an applied force image for the touch device's surface. The applied force location [X, Y] can be determined from measures of cover glass tilt, force at particular points, and capacitive sensing of touch location.
    Type: Application
    Filed: September 21, 2012
    Publication date: March 27, 2014
    Applicant: Apple Inc.
    Inventors: Brian Q. Huppi, Omar Sze Leung, Craig Christopher Leong, Paul Stephen Drzaic
  • Publication number: 20140085247
    Abstract: A touch device including a force sensor disposed between capacitive sensing structures, so both touch and force sensing occur capacitively using device drivers in rows and columns. A dual-layer cover glass, with gel adhesive separating first and second CG layers, so capacitive sensing between the first and second CG layers can determine both touch locations and applied force. The first and second CG layers include a compressible material having a Poisson's ratio of less than approximately 0.48, the force sensor being embedded therein, or disposed between the first and second CG layers. Applied force is detected using capacitive detection of depression of the first CG layer. Depression is responsive to compressible features smaller than optical wavelengths, so those features are substantially invisible to users. Alternatively, the compressible features may be large enough to be seen by a user, but made substantially invisible through the use of a fluid or other element filling spaces between the features.
    Type: Application
    Filed: September 21, 2012
    Publication date: March 27, 2014
    Applicant: Apple Inc.
    Inventors: Omar Sze Leung, Jonah A. Harley, James E. Wright, Craig Christopher Leong, Kristina A. Babiarz
  • Publication number: 20140085253
    Abstract: A touch device including a force sensor disposed between capacitive sensing structures, so both touch and force sensing occur capacitively using device drivers in rows and columns. A dual-layer cover glass, with gel adhesive separating first and second CG layers, so capacitive sensing between the first and second CG layers can determine both touch locations and applied force. The first and second CG layers include a compressible material having a Poisson's ratio of less than approximately 0.48, the force sensor being embedded therein, or disposed between the first and second CG layers. Applied force is detected using capacitive detection of depression of the first CG layer. Depression is responsive to compressible features smaller than optical wavelengths, so those features are substantially invisible to users. Alternatively, the compressible features may be large enough to be seen by a user, but made substantially invisible through the use of a fluid or other element filling spaces between the features.
    Type: Application
    Filed: November 14, 2012
    Publication date: March 27, 2014
    Applicant: Apple Inc.
    Inventors: Omar Sze Leung, Jonah A. Harley, James E. Wright, Craig Christopher Leong, Kristina A. Babiarz