Patents by Inventor Daniel E. Wolf

Daniel E. Wolf has filed for patents to protect the following inventions. This listing includes patent applications that are pending as well as patents that have already been granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

  • Publication number: 20200333347
    Abstract: The invention generally relates to antibodies that bind to human folate receptor 1 and diagnostic assays for folate receptor 1-based therapies. Methods of using the antibodies to monitor therapy are further provided.
    Type: Application
    Filed: February 28, 2020
    Publication date: October 22, 2020
    Inventors: Christina N. CARRIGAN, Olga AB, Daniel TAVARES, Beni B. WOLF, Nathan E. TESTA
  • Patent number: 10488183
    Abstract: A sensor system for sensing deformation of a flexible structure includes a beam structure that will be coupled to a surface of the flexible structure having a natural frequency fs, an axial strain ?axialstructure, and a shear strain ?xystructure associated therewith. The beam structure has an axial strain ?axialbeam and a shear strain ?xybeam associated therewith. The beam structure satisfies criteria defined by minimization of a root mean square difference between ?axialstructure and ?axialbeam and minimization of a root mean square difference between ?xystructure and ?xybeam. Fiber optic strain sensors are coupled to and distributed in a spaced-apart fashion along the beam structure. The beam structure is more flexible than the flexible structure such that a combination of the beam structure, the fiber optic sensors, and the flexible structure has a natural frequency fc defined by (0.95)fs?fc?(1.05)fs.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: December 22, 2017
    Date of Patent: November 26, 2019
    Assignee: United States of America as Represented by the Administrator of NASA
    Inventors: Michael G. Wolf, Jeffrey D. Suhey, James E. Stanley, Edwin D. Griffin, Hector Gutierrez, Daniel Kirk, Gabriel Lapilli, Weihua Su, Natsuki Tsushima, Bartel van der Veek
  • Patent number: 4344135
    Abstract: In order to verify the authenticity of the signature of an individual, first a sample signature is written with a pen which can generate electrical signals representative of the forces exerted in the plane of the paper in the process of writing. These signals are sampled and then scaled so that the signature when displayed, can be fitted within a predetermined display area. The scaled signals generated from the sample signature are then stored. When it is desired to compare the sample signature with a signature which is subsequently written, called a specimen signature, the specimen signature is written and is processed for display in the same manner as was the sample signature. The scaled sample signature signals are then called out of storage and displayed, as are the scaled signals generated in the course of writing the specimen signature. Any deviations between the signatures are very readily detectable by observing the display.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 7, 1978
    Date of Patent: August 10, 1982
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Hewitt D. Crane, Daniel E. Wolf
  • Patent number: 4190820
    Abstract: When trains of signals, derived from a written template signature, are to be compared directly with trains of signals, derived from a written specimen signature, because no two written signatures are identical, there is a requirement for providing a certain degree of "rubberiness" between the specimen and template signals. Previously, such rubberiness was achieved by breaking up the trains of signals into fixed portions and then conducting translation, stretch and contraction between these fixed portions in the course of the comparison. In this invention, advantage is taken of the existence of prominent landmarks in the trains of signals of the template and specimen signatures. The trains of signals are broken into segments by these landmarks. Segments of the specimen are stretched or contracted and translated to match corresponding segments of the template, to greatly simplify and enhance correlation process.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: April 21, 1978
    Date of Patent: February 26, 1980
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute International
    Inventors: Hewitt D. Crane, Daniel E. Wolf
  • Patent number: 4156911
    Abstract: In order to verify the authenticity of the signature of an individual, first a sample signature is written with a pen which can generate electrical signals representative of the forces exerted in the plane of the paper in the process of writing. These signals are sampled and then scaled so that the signature when displayed, can be fitted within a predetermined display area. The scaled signals generated from the sample signature are then stored. When it is desired to compare the sample signature with a signature which is subsequently written, called a specimen signature, the specimen signature is written and is processed for display in the same manner as was the sample signature. The scaled sample signature signals are then called out of storage and displayed, as are the scaled signals generated in the course of writing the specimen signature. Any deviations between the signatures are very readily detectable by observing the display.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: November 18, 1975
    Date of Patent: May 29, 1979
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Hewitt D. Crane, Daniel E. Wolf
  • Patent number: 4040010
    Abstract: A person, who is to have his identity verified, first writes his signature or any other appropriate group of characters or symbols several times with a special pen which produces signals representative of the writing forces in the plane of the paper and the writing pressure. From these a number of different parameters are derived. These parameters may be, for example, average value, energy, timing, number of zero crossings, etc. Average values and standard deviations are obtained for each of these parameters and these are stored as components of a template vector. In order to detect whether or not a later handwriting sample is authentic, a measure of the difference between the template vector and the later handwriting sample vector is calculated. The distinction between true signatures and forgeries is then made on the basis of this difference. If it is less than an appropriately selected value the signature is judged authentic while if it is above such value it is judged a forgery.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: November 6, 1975
    Date of Patent: August 2, 1977
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Hewitt D. Crane, Daniel E. Wolf, John S. Ostrem