Patents by Inventor Joel Adair

Joel Adair has filed for patents to protect the following inventions. This listing includes patent applications that are pending as well as patents that have already been granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

  • Publication number: 20070292813
    Abstract: The present invention relates to melting plate candles which employ heat conductive elements to distribute heat from a burning flame at a wick to a support plate for a solid fuel and to the body of said solid fuel, so as to more rapidly liquefy the solid fuel, such as paraffin wax, and to more uniformly and intensely heat such fuels to increase the efficiency of consumption thereof and to more rapidly release volatile materials contained within said fuels. The heat conductive support plate is configured so as to have a capillary pedestal upon the surface thereof, which cooperatively engages a wick holder comprising a preferably consumable wick and heat conductive fins which conduct heat from a flame upon said wick to said support plate, said wick holder further engaging said capillary pedestal in such a locking manner as to resist accidental removal from said pedestal.
    Type: Application
    Filed: July 17, 2007
    Publication date: December 20, 2007
    Inventors: Joel Adair, Sean Dwyer, Elizabeth Jameson, Chris Kubicek, Padma Varanasi, Paul Furner, Cory Nelson, Matthew Montei
  • Publication number: 20070248502
    Abstract: Disclosed are devices for dispensing air treatment chemicals, and refill units for use therewith. Some of these devices have a well facing the heater and a transparent wall to view the use up of the air treatment chemical. Other of these devices have a refill with wells positioned in opposing directions.
    Type: Application
    Filed: April 20, 2006
    Publication date: October 25, 2007
    Inventors: Joel Adair, Brian Davis, Gopal Ananth, David Mather
  • Publication number: 20070194144
    Abstract: Disclosed is a device suitable for dispensing air treatment chemicals by heating a substrate impregnated with the chemicals. The device has a heater in the form of a table where a face of the table radiates heat directly to the impregnated substrate. The substrate releases the air treatment chemical back towards the heater. A transverse air pathway permits venting of the volatile chemical. Also disclosed are methods for assembling such devices.
    Type: Application
    Filed: February 22, 2006
    Publication date: August 23, 2007
    Inventors: Brian Davis, Joel Adair, Saleh Saleh, Robert Emmrich
  • Publication number: 20070183981
    Abstract: Disclosed are substrates suited for dispensing air treatment chemicals upon being heated. Granular particles, preferably sand with a phenolic binder, are adhered together to form a substrate body having a network of pores. A volatile air treatment chemical is disposed in the pores. The particle size and pores are such that the smaller particles of the substrate are grouped at one end, preferably an end adjacent to a projecting nose. This structure tends to wick the volatile air treatment chemical towards the nose, and heating that area can lead to efficient, and rechargeable, dispensing. Methods for using such substrates, and methods for forming such substrates, are disclosed.
    Type: Application
    Filed: February 7, 2006
    Publication date: August 9, 2007
    Inventors: Padma Varanasi, Joel Adair
  • Publication number: 20070181054
    Abstract: Heated volatile dispensers are disclosed that are provided with automated use-up indicators. The indicators are associated with a porous substrate. A migrateable dye is covered by meltable material adjacent the substrate. Heating of a substrate such as a slab impregnated with an insect repellent both causes the insect repellent to dispense and melts the covering. The dye then migrates to a visible surface of the substrate to indicate a degree of use. The extent of migration, and the patterns formed on the visible surface by the migrating dye, indicate the extent to which the volatile air treatment chemical has been dispensed.
    Type: Application
    Filed: February 3, 2006
    Publication date: August 9, 2007
    Inventors: Joel Adair, Brian Davis, Gopal Ananth, Padma Varanasi
  • Publication number: 20070181707
    Abstract: Heated volatile dispensers are disclosed that are provided with automated dye-based use-up indicators. Multiple migrate able dyes of different colors are positioned adjacent a porous substrate. Heating of the substrate, such as a slab impregnated with an insect repellent, both causes the impregnated chemical to dispense from the slab and the indicator dyes to migrate to one or more visible positions. One dye migrates to a visible position faster than a dye of a different color. Further heating may cause one or both dyes to change color at a visible position. The dye movement imparts information about the degree of use-up of the impregnating chemical.
    Type: Application
    Filed: February 3, 2006
    Publication date: August 9, 2007
    Inventors: Joel Adair, Brian Davis, Gopal Ananth, Padma Varanasi
  • Publication number: 20070183932
    Abstract: Disclosed are devices for dispensing air treatment chemicals. There is a substrate bearing a first volatile air treatment chemical that is capable of being dispensed from the substrate when the substrate is heated, and an indicator unit holding a volatile indicator chemical separate from the first volatile air treatment chemical such that the volatile indicator chemical is capable of being dispensed from the unit when the unit is heated. The extent of dispensing of the first volatile air treatment chemical can be indicated by a visible cue whose appearance results from the dispensing of the volatile indicator chemical. In one form the unit also holds a second air treatment chemical. In another the indicator unit is a replaceable cartridge positionable more remote from the heater than the substrate.
    Type: Application
    Filed: February 3, 2006
    Publication date: August 9, 2007
    Inventors: Joel Adair, Brian Davis, Gopal Ananth, Thomas Szymczak
  • Publication number: 20070034082
    Abstract: The present invention is an air purifier including an ionizing assembly that operates to charge particulate material in an air flow passing through the purifier. The charged particulate material is attracted to and retained by a filter element disposed downstream of the ionization assembly and having an electrical charge opposite to the charged particulate material. The purified air passing through the filter is directed out of the device, optionally in conjunction with a fragrance that is added to the purified air flow. The ionizing assembly is formed with a ground member disposed adjacent the ionizing member to keep the electrons generated by the ionizing assembly within the purifier, and thus prevent static discharges from occurring outside of the purifier. The air flow is directed by a fan through the purifier in an angular and substantially laminar manner, such that the efficiency of the purifier is increased.
    Type: Application
    Filed: May 30, 2006
    Publication date: February 15, 2007
    Inventors: Joel Adair, Rene Beland, James Crapser, C. Eagleton, Thomas Gasper, Dennis Gruber, Jeffrey Harwig, Padma Varanasi
  • Publication number: 20060124442
    Abstract: A fluid purifying device having various embodiments, each of which is capable of removing airborne molecules, such as contaminants, malodors, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pathogens, mold and bacteria, using the combination of visible light and a photocatalyst that has been either treated with a photosensitizer or has been treated in some other manner to lower the energy required to activate the photocatalyst (i.e., by having it generate free radicals) to that emitted by visible light bulbs. Preferably, the device is an air purifying device; however, the device could also be used as a liquid (e.g., water) purifying device.
    Type: Application
    Filed: December 14, 2004
    Publication date: June 15, 2006
    Inventors: Richard Valpey, Joel Adair, Padma Varanasi, Matthew Jones, Daniel Plankenborn
  • Publication number: 20060093979
    Abstract: The present invention relates to container candles, such as melting plate candles, which employ heat conductive elements to distribute heat from a burning flame at a wick to a support plate for a solid fuel and to the body of said solid fuel, so as to more rapidly liquefy the solid fuel, such as paraffin wax, and to more uniformly and intensely heat such fuels to increase the efficiency of consumption thereof and to more rapidly release volatile materials contained within said fuels.
    Type: Application
    Filed: November 1, 2004
    Publication date: May 4, 2006
    Inventors: Padma Varanasi, Joel Adair, Guy Daley, Thomas Szymczak
  • Publication number: 20060057525
    Abstract: The present invention relates to melting plate candles which employ heat conductive elements to distribute heat from a burning flame at a wick to a support plate for a solid fuel and to the body of said solid fuel, so as to more rapidly liquefy the solid fuel, such as paraffin wax, and to more uniformly and intensely heat such fuels to increase the efficiency of consumption thereof and to more rapidly release volatile materials contained within said fuels. The heat conductive support plate is configured so as to have a capillary pedestal upon the surface thereof, which cooperatively engages a wick holder comprising a preferably consumable wick and heat conductive fins which conduct heat from a flame upon said wick to said support plate, said wick holder further engaging said capillary pedestal in such a locking manner as to resist accidental removal from said pedestal.
    Type: Application
    Filed: September 10, 2004
    Publication date: March 16, 2006
    Inventors: Joel Adair, S.G. Dwyer, Elizabeth Jameson, Chris Kubicek, Padma Varanasi
  • Publication number: 20060057524
    Abstract: The present invention relates to melting plate candles which employ heat conductive elements to distribute heat from a burning flame at a wick to a support plate for a solid fuel and to the body of said solid fuel, so as to more rapidly liquefy the solid fuel, such as paraffin wax, and to more uniformly and intensely heat such fuels to increase the efficiency of consumption thereof and to more rapidly release volatile materials contained within said fuels. The heat conductive support plate is configured so as to have a capillary pedestal upon the surface thereof, which cooperatively engages a wick holder comprising a preferably consumable wick and heat conductive fins which conduct heat from a flame upon said wick to said support plate. The wick holder also provides capillary fins by which liquified fuel is transported from said support plate to said flame, Said wick holder further engages said capillary pedestal in such a locking manner as to resist accidental removal from said pedestal.
    Type: Application
    Filed: September 10, 2004
    Publication date: March 16, 2006
    Inventors: Elizabeth Jameson, Chris Kubicek, Thomas Szymczak, Padma Varanasi, Joel Adair
  • Publication number: 20060057530
    Abstract: A fuel charge for use with a melting plate candle assembly includes an outer shell of fuel material surrounding an inner core of fuel material having different properties than the fuel material of the outer shell. The outer shell is substantially solid and may contain fuel additive that slows capillary flow of liquid fuel to the flame through the wick. The inner core may include liquid fuel, discrete solid fuel particles, or a solid fuel mass. The fuel additive is disposed in the fuel charge so as to slow migration of liquefied fuel to a flame on a wick only after a substantial portion of the fuel charge has been liquefied by heat from the flame.
    Type: Application
    Filed: August 5, 2005
    Publication date: March 16, 2006
    Inventors: Chris Kubicek, Thomas Szymczak, Kara Lakatos, Padma Varanasi, Joel Adair
  • Publication number: 20060057527
    Abstract: The present invention relates to melting plate candles which employ heat conductive elements to distribute heat from a burning flame at a wick to a support plate for a solid fuel and to the body of said solid fuel, so as to more rapidly liquefy the solid fuel, such as paraffin wax, and to more uniformly and intensely heat such fuels to increase the efficiency of consumption thereof and to more rapidly release volatile materials contained within said fuels. The heat conductive support plate is configured so as to have a capillary pedestal upon the surface thereof, which cooperatively engages a wick holder comprising a preferably consumable wick and heat conductive fins which conduct heat from a flame upon said wick to said support plate, said wick holder further engaging said capillary pedestal in such a locking manner as to resist accidental removal from said pedestal.
    Type: Application
    Filed: December 15, 2004
    Publication date: March 16, 2006
    Inventors: Joel Adair, Georgia Tenhagen, Padma Varanasi
  • Publication number: 20060026817
    Abstract: Disclosed is a method of designing an aerosol spray dispensing system. One or more to-be-determined attributes of the spray dispenser system are identified, including properties of a fluid to be dispensed, characteristics of the dispensing mechanism, and performance characteristic values. The identified attributes are determined using equations taking into account relationships among the properties of the fluid to be dispensed, the characteristics of the dispensing mechanism and the performance characteristic values. Once determined, the attributes are used to design the spray dispensing system.
    Type: Application
    Filed: July 21, 2005
    Publication date: February 9, 2006
    Inventors: Richard Valpey, Paul Clark, Peter Smereka, Padma Varanasi, Joel Adair
  • Publication number: 20060011733
    Abstract: A solid, dimensionally stable wick including a porous portion having capillary passages for drawing a liquid from a lower end to an upper end, and a substantially non-porous portion that has not more than about five percent by volume porosity. The wick is particularly useful in supplying fluid to an atomization device from a reservoir.
    Type: Application
    Filed: June 29, 2005
    Publication date: January 19, 2006
    Inventors: Padma Varanasi, Joel Adair
  • Publication number: 20050284896
    Abstract: A valve assembly can automatically dispense aerosol content from an aerosol container at predetermined intervals without the use of electric power. A diaphragm at least partially defines an accumulation chamber that receives gas propellant from a portion of the can during an accumulation phase. Once the internal pressure of the accumulation chamber reaches a predetermined threshold, the diaphragm moves, carrying with it a seal so as to unseal an outlet channel, and thereby initiate a spray burst of the main active chemical. The diaphragm assumes its original position when the pressure within the accumulation chamber falls below a threshold pressure.
    Type: Application
    Filed: June 29, 2004
    Publication date: December 29, 2005
    Inventors: Thomas Jaworski, Nathan Westphal, Padma Varanasi, Darren Robling, Joel Adair, Chris Kubicek
  • Publication number: 20050284952
    Abstract: A wick assembly is provided for use in a dispensing device that dispenses volatile material from a wick by heat. Two wick sections of differing material are provided in stacked fashion, with a coupler sleeve that can be used to facilitate attachment of the wick structure to a reservoir. One wick section preferably provides control over the rate of dispensing, where the other provides improved thermal resistance and resistance to clogging.
    Type: Application
    Filed: June 24, 2004
    Publication date: December 29, 2005
    Inventors: Brian Davis, Robert Emmrich, Kenneth Welch, Padma Varanasi, Joel Adair
  • Publication number: 20050247802
    Abstract: Methods and devices include having a container (1) for holding a liquid with a viscosity ?, and a porous wick (5) with an average pore size of at least about 4 microns to about 50 microns and a porosity ? between about 0.20 to about 0.75, and having a length L and a total exposed surface area A exposed to the ambient air. The viscosity of the liquid and the dimensions of the wick are such that a quantity A/?L is in a range of about 4×10?4 to about 18 cm/poise.
    Type: Application
    Filed: May 3, 2005
    Publication date: November 10, 2005
    Inventors: Padma Varanasi, Joel Adair