Patents by Inventor Michael Farzan

Michael Farzan has filed for patents to protect the following inventions. This listing includes patent applications that are pending as well as patents that have already been granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

  • Publication number: 20160340405
    Abstract: The present invention provides methods and compositions for optimally co-expressing in a primate subject a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST) and a lentiviral gp120-binding molecule to provide potent and long term protection against lentiviral infections.
    Type: Application
    Filed: April 28, 2016
    Publication date: November 24, 2016
    Inventors: Matthew Gardner, Michael Farzan
  • Patent number: 7429653
    Abstract: The present application is directed to stabilized HIV envelope glycoprotein trimers. The trimers are stabilized by introducing trimeric motifs, preferably the GCN4 coiled coil or the fibritin trimeric domain, at certain sites, for example in the gp41 ectodomain. These stabilized trimers or DNA molecules encoding such trimers can be used to generate an immunogenic reaction. The trimers can also be used in assays to screen for molecules that interact with them—and to identify molecules that interact with specific sites.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: May 11, 2005
    Date of Patent: September 30, 2008
    Assignee: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc.
    Inventors: Joseph G. Sodroski, Richard Wyatt, Xinzhen Yang, Michael Farzan, Peter D. Kwong
  • Patent number: 7105655
    Abstract: The present application is directed to stabilized envelope glycoprotein trimers. The trimers are stabilized by introducing disulfide bonds at certain sites in the gp41 ectodomain. DNA molecules encoding such trimers can be used to generate an immunogenic reaction.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: June 25, 2002
    Date of Patent: September 12, 2006
    Assignee: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Inventors: Joseph G. Sodroski, Michael Farzan
  • Patent number: 7048929
    Abstract: A modified polypeptide corresponding to an envelope glycoprotein of a primate lentivirus is described. The polypeptide has been modified from the wild-type structure so that it has cysteine amino acid residues introduced to create disulfide bonds, a cavity is filled with hydrophobic amino acids, a Proresidue is introduced at a defined turn structure of the protein, or the hydrophobicity is increased across the interface between different domains, while retaining the overall 3-dimensional structure of a discontinuous conserved epitope of the wild-type protein. Preferably, the polypeptide has more than one of those characteristics. Preferably, the primate lentivirus is HIV, and the protein is HIV-1 gp120.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: November 10, 1998
    Date of Patent: May 23, 2006
    Assignees: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc., The Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York
    Inventors: Joseph G Sodroski, Richard T. Wyatt, Peter D. Kwong, Wayne A. Hendrickson, Michael Farzan
  • Publication number: 20050282154
    Abstract: The present invention is based upon the identification of human angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2) as a functional receptor for the SARS coronavirus. Transfection of cells with ACE-2 confers upon them the ability to support viral replication. In addition, assays performed using ACE-2 together with the S protein of the SARS virus or a fragment derived from the S protein can be used to identify inhibitors that block the interaction between virus and host cell.
    Type: Application
    Filed: October 5, 2004
    Publication date: December 22, 2005
    Inventors: Michael Farzan, Wenhui Li, Michael Moore
  • Publication number: 20050220817
    Abstract: The present application is directed to stabilized HIV envelope glycoprotein trimers. The trimers are stabilized by introducing trimeric motifs, preferably the GCN4 coiled coil or the fibritin trimeric domain, at certain sites, for example in the gp41 ectodomain. These stabilized trimers or DNA molecules encoding such trimers can be used to generate an immunogenic reaction. The trimers can also be used in assays to screen for molecules that interact with them—and to identify molecules that interact with specific sites.
    Type: Application
    Filed: May 11, 2005
    Publication date: October 6, 2005
    Applicants: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc., The Trustees of Columbia University
    Inventors: Joseph Sodroski, Richard Wyatt, Xinzhen Yang, Michael Farzan, Peter Kwong
  • Patent number: 6911205
    Abstract: The present application is directed to stabilized HIV envelope glycoprotein trimers. The trimers are stabilized by introducing trimeric motifs, preferably the GCN4 coiled coil or the fibritin trimeric domain at certain sites, for example in the gp41 ectodomain. These stabilized trimers or DNA molecules encoding such trimers can be used to generate an immunogenic reaction. The trimers can also be used in assays to screen for molecules that interact with them—and to identify molecules that interact with specific sites.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: March 18, 2002
    Date of Patent: June 28, 2005
    Assignees: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc., The Trustees of Columbia University
    Inventors: Joseph G. Sodroski, Richard Wyatt, Xinzhen Yang, Michael Farzan, Peter D. Kwong
  • Publication number: 20050113298
    Abstract: The present invention is directed to peptides that bind to the cellular receptors for the SARS S protein. The invention also includes polynucleotides coding for these peptides and methods in which they can be used to block the binding of the S protein to receptor. The peptides can also be detectably labeled and used in assays for identifying cells that have receptors for the S protein, in vaccines and for identifying other agents that inhibit receptor binding.
    Type: Application
    Filed: September 13, 2004
    Publication date: May 26, 2005
    Inventors: Michael Farzan, Wenhui Li
  • Publication number: 20050106177
    Abstract: The present application is directed to stabilized HIV envelope glycoprotein trimers. The trimers are stabilized by introducing trimeric motifs, preferably the GCN4 coiled coil or the fibritin trimeric domain, at certain sites, for example in the gp41 ectodomain. These stabilized trimers or DNA molecules encoding such trimers can be used to generate an immunogenic reaction. The trimers can also be used in assays to screen for molecules that interact with them—and to identify molecules that interact with specific sites.
    Type: Application
    Filed: March 18, 2002
    Publication date: May 19, 2005
    Inventors: Joseph Sodroski, Richard Wyatt, Xinzhen Yang, Michael Farzan, Peter Kwong
  • Patent number: 6716429
    Abstract: Biochemical and structural studies of fragments of the ectodomain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein have demonstrated that the molecular contacts between alpha helices allow the formation of a trimeric coiled coil. By introducing cysteine residues into specific locations along these alpha helices, the normally labile HIV-1 gp160 envelope glycoprotein was converted into a stable disulfide-linked oligomer. Although proteolytic cleavage into gp120 and gp41 glycoproteins was largely blocked, the disulfide-linked oligomer was efficiently transported to the cell surface and was recognized by a series of conformationally dependent antibodies. The pattern of hetero-oligomer formation between this construct and an analogous construct lacking portions of the gp120 variable loops and of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail demonstrates that these oligomers are trimers.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: October 1, 1998
    Date of Patent: April 6, 2004
    Assignee: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc.
    Inventors: Joseph G. Sodroski, Michael Farzan
  • Publication number: 20030086943
    Abstract: The present application is directed to stabilized envelope glycoprotein trimers. The trimers are stabilized by introducing disulfide bonds at certain sites in the gp41 ectodomain. DNA molecules encoding such trimers can be used to generate an immunogenic reaction.
    Type: Application
    Filed: June 25, 2002
    Publication date: May 8, 2003
    Inventors: Joseph G. Sodroski, Michael Farzan