Patents by Inventor Solomon H. Snyder

Solomon H. Snyder has filed for patents to protect the following inventions. This listing includes patent applications that are pending as well as patents that have already been granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

  • Patent number: 9937144
    Abstract: The present invention relates to the field of drug abuse. More specifically, the present invention provides methods and compositions for treating drug abuse by preventing GAPDH nitrosylation. In one specific embodiment, a method for preventing the stimulant and neurotoxic effects of cocaine comprises the step of administering a compound that prevents the nitrosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) by nitric oxide (NO). In another embodiment, a method for preventing the stimulant and neurotoxic effects of cocaine comprises the step of administering a compound that prevents the binding of GAPDH to Siah.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: January 30, 2014
    Date of Patent: April 10, 2018
    Assignee: THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Nilkantha Sen, Risheng Xu
  • Publication number: 20150359776
    Abstract: The present invention relates to the field of drug abuse. More specifically, the present invention provides methods and compositions for treating drug abuse by preventing GAPDH nitrosylation. In one specific embodiment, a method for preventing the stimulant and neurotoxic effects of cocaine comprises the step of administering a compound that prevents the nitrosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) by nitric oxide (NO). In another embodiment, a method for preventing the stimulant and neurotoxic effects of cocaine comprises the step of administering a compound that prevents the binding of GAPDH to Siah.
    Type: Application
    Filed: January 30, 2014
    Publication date: December 17, 2015
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Nilkantha Sen, Risheng Xu
  • Publication number: 20130131028
    Abstract: Described herein are methods for modulation of the activity of the carotid body that afford therapeutic benefit for sleep-related breathing disorders and related conditions.
    Type: Application
    Filed: April 11, 2011
    Publication date: May 23, 2013
    Applicants: JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, SOVA PHARMACEUTICALS, INC., THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Moataz M. Gadalla, Nanduri R. Prabhakar, Gregory Stein, Gary Pace
  • Patent number: 8148095
    Abstract: The atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs) have markedly enhanced the treatment of schizophrenias but their use has been hindered by the major weight gain elicited by some AAPDs. We found that orexigenic AAPDs potently and selectively activate hypothalamic AMP kinase (AMPK), an action abolished in mice with deletion of histamine H1 receptors. These findings afford a means of developing better therapeutic agents and provide insight into the hypothalamic regulation of food intake.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 10, 2007
    Date of Patent: April 3, 2012
    Assignees: The Johns Hopkins University, The University of Vermont College of Medicine
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Alex Huang, Cory Teuscher, Sangwon Kim
  • Patent number: 8080367
    Abstract: Anti-cancer drugs are identified by screening for agents and compounds which inhibit the binding of HSP90 and IP6K2. In vitro and in vivo assays can be used. Any phenomenon associated with the binding or inhibition can be monitored, including cell death, subcellular localization, catalytic activity of IP6K2, and IP7 formation.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: December 11, 2007
    Date of Patent: December 20, 2011
    Assignee: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Anutosh Chakraborty, Michael Koldobskiy, Katherine Sixt, Krishna Juluri, Asif K Mustafa, Damian B Van Rossum, Randen L Patterson
  • Publication number: 20100129806
    Abstract: Anti-cancer drugs are identified by screening for agents and compounds which inhibit the binding of HSP90 and IP6K2. In vitro and in vivo assays can be used. Any phenomenon associated with the binding or inhibition can be monitored, including cell death, subcellular localization, catalytic activity of IP6K2, and IP7 formation.
    Type: Application
    Filed: December 11, 2007
    Publication date: May 27, 2010
    Applicant: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Anutosh Chakraborty, Michael Koldobskiy, Katherine Sixt, Krishna Juluri, Asif K. Mustafa, Damian B. Van Rossum, Randen L. Patterson
  • Publication number: 20090304596
    Abstract: The atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs) have markedly enhanced the treatment of schizophrenias but their use has been hindered by the major weight gain elicited by some AAPDs. We found that orexigenic AAPDs potently and selectively activate hypothalamic AMP kinase (AMPK), an action abolished in mice with deletion of histamine H1 receptors. These findings afford a means of developing better therapeutic agents and provide insight into the hypothalamic regulation of food intake.
    Type: Application
    Filed: September 10, 2007
    Publication date: December 10, 2009
    Applicant: THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Alex Huang, Cory Teuscher, Sangwon Kim
  • Publication number: 20080193952
    Abstract: Cyclooxygenase (COX2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are two major inflammatory mediators. Inducible NOS specifically binds to COX2 and S-nitrosylates it, enhancing COX2 catalytic activity. Selectively disrupting iNOS-COX2 binding prevents NO-mediated activation of COX2. The synergistic molecular interaction between two inflammatory systems permits assays for developing anti-inflammatory drugs.
    Type: Application
    Filed: April 14, 2008
    Publication date: August 14, 2008
    Applicant: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Sangwon Kim
  • Patent number: 7358237
    Abstract: Cyclooxygenase (COX2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are two major inflammatory mediators. Inducible NOS specifically binds to COX2 and S-nitrosylates it, enhancing COX2 catalytic activity. Selectively disrupting iNOS—COX2 binding prevents NO-mediated activation of COX2. The synergistic molecular interaction between two inflammatory systems permits assays for developing anti-inflammatory drugs.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: April 28, 2006
    Date of Patent: April 15, 2008
    Assignee: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Sangwon Kim
  • Patent number: 7001738
    Abstract: Many of the effects of nitric oxide are mediated by the direct modification of cysteine residues resulting in an adduct called a nitrosothiol. A method to detect proteins which contain nitrosothiols involves several steps. Nitrosylated cysteines are converted to tagged cysteines. Tagged proteins can then be detected, for example, by immunoblotting and/or can be purified by affinity chromatography. The method is applicable to the detection of S-nitrosylated proteins in cell lysates following in vitro S-nitrosylation, as well as to the detection of endogenous S-nitrosothiols in selected protein substrates.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: August 27, 2004
    Date of Patent: February 21, 2006
    Assignees: The Johns Hopkins University, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Samie R. Jaffrey, Christopher D. Ferris, Hediye Erdjument-Bromage, Paul Tempst
  • Patent number: 6806057
    Abstract: Many of the effects of nitric oxide are mediated by the direct modification of cysteine residues resulting in an adduct called a nitrosothiol. A method to detect proteins which contain nitrosothiols involves several steps. Nitrosylated cysteines are converted to tagged cysteines. Tagged proteins can then be detected, for example, by immunoblotting and/or can be purified by affinity chromatography. The method is applicable to the detection of S-nitrosylated proteins in cell lysates following in vitro S-nitrosylation, as well as to the detection of endogenous S-nitrosothiols in selected protein substrates.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: October 29, 2001
    Date of Patent: October 19, 2004
    Assignee: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Samie R. Jaffrey, Christopher D. Ferris, Hediye Erdjument-Bromage, Paul Tempst
  • Patent number: 6774128
    Abstract: Disclosed are methods for preventing or treating a gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in a mammal such as a human patient. In one embodiment, the methods include administering to the mammal a therapeutically effective amount of a compound that modulates a nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, particularly in GI neurons. Methods of the invention are particularly useful for the treatment (including prophylactic treatment) of diabetic gastropathies and other GI disorders.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: April 19, 2001
    Date of Patent: August 10, 2004
    Assignee: Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Crystal C. Watkins, Solomon H. Snyder, Christopher D. Ferris
  • Publication number: 20030013645
    Abstract: This invention relates to the method of using neurotrophic cyclophilin inhibitor compounds having an affinity for cyclophilin-type immunophilins as inhibitors of the enzyme activity associated with immunophilin proteins, and particularly inhibitors of peptidyl-prolyl isomerase or rotamase enzyme activity.
    Type: Application
    Filed: July 22, 2002
    Publication date: January 16, 2003
    Inventors: Joseph P. Steiner, Gregory S. Hamilton, Solomon H. Snyder
  • Patent number: 6492106
    Abstract: A protein complex containing 245 kDa and 35 kDa components, designated RAFT1 and RAFT2 (for Rapamycin And FKBP12 Target) interacts with FKBP12 in a rapamycin-dependent manner. This interaction has the pharmacological characteristics expected from the observed in vivo effects of rapamycin: it occurs at low nanomolar concentrations of rapamycin and is competed by excess FK506. Sequences (330 amino acids total) of tryptic peptides derived from the affinity purified 245 kDa RAFT1 reveals striking homologies to the predicted products of the yeast TOR genes, which were originally identified by mutations that confer rapamycin resistance in yeast. A RAFT1 cDNA was obtained and found to encode a 289 kDa protein (2550 amino acids) that is 43% and 39% identical to TOR2 and TOR1, respectively.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 14, 1994
    Date of Patent: December 10, 2002
    Assignee: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: David M. Sabatini, Hediye Erdjument-Bromage, Mary Lui, Paul Tempst, Solomon H. Snyder
  • Patent number: 6476200
    Abstract: A protein complex containing 245 kDa and 35 kDa components, designated RAFT1 and RAFT2 (for Rapamycin And FKBP12 Target) interacts with FKBP12 in a rapamycin-dependent manner. This interaction has the pharmacological characteristics expected from the observed in vivo effects of rapamycin: it occurs at low nanomolar concentrations of rapamycin and is competed by excess FK506. Sequences (330 amino acids total) of tryptic peptides derived from the affinity purified 245 kDa RAFT1 reveals striking homologies to the predicted products of the yeast TOR genes, which were originally identified by mutations that confer rapamycin resistance in yeast. A RAFT1 cDNA was obtained and found to encode a 289 kDa protein (2550 amino acids) that is 43% and 39% identical to TOR2 and TOR1, respectively.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: June 27, 1994
    Date of Patent: November 5, 2002
    Assignee: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: David M. Sabatini, Hediye Erdjument-Bromage, Mary Lui, Paul Tempst, Solomon H. Snyder
  • Publication number: 20020128171
    Abstract: Disclosed are methods for preventing or treating a gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in a mammal such as a human patient. In one embodiment, the methods include administering to the mammal a therapeutically effective amount of a compound that modulates a nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, particularly in GI neurons. Methods of the invention are particularly useful for the treatment (including prophylactic treatment) of diabetic gastropathies and other GI disorders.
    Type: Application
    Filed: April 19, 2001
    Publication date: September 12, 2002
    Inventors: Crystal C. Watkins, Solomon H. Snyder, Christopher D. Ferris
  • Patent number: 6444643
    Abstract: This invention relates to the method of using neurotrophic cyclophilin inhibitor compounds having an affinity for cyclophilin-type immunophilins as inhibitors of the enzyme activity associated with immunophilin proteins, and particularly inhibitors of peptidyl-prolyl isomerase or rotamase enzyme activity.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: May 28, 1999
    Date of Patent: September 3, 2002
    Assignees: Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
    Inventors: Joseph P. Steiner, Gregory S. Hamilton, Solomon H. Snyder
  • Publication number: 20020102744
    Abstract: Many of the effects of nitric oxide are mediated by the direct modification of cysteine residues resulting in an adduct called a nitrosothiol. A method to detect proteins which contain nitrosothiols involves several steps. Nitrosylated cysteines are converted to tagged cysteines. Tagged proteins can then be detected, for example, by immunoblotting and/or can be purified by affinity chromatography. The method is applicable to the detection of S-nitrosylated proteins in cell lysates following in vitro S-nitrosylation, as well as to the detection of endogenous S-nitrosothiols in selected protein substrates.
    Type: Application
    Filed: October 29, 2001
    Publication date: August 1, 2002
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Samic R. Jaffrey
  • Patent number: 6362160
    Abstract: Immunophilin-binding agents inhibit the phosphatase calcineurin, leading to the increased phosphorylation of certain brain proteins, including nitric oxide synthase. The increased levels of phosphorylation of nitric oxide synthase inhibits the enzymatic production of nitric oxide. Thus the neurotoxic effects of glutamate, which are ordinarily the result of vascular strokes and other neurodegenerative diseases, are minimized, because the neurotoxic effects are at least partially mediated by nitric oxide. Thus immunophilin-binding drugs can be used therapeutically in the treatment of vascular stroke and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: June 30, 1993
    Date of Patent: March 26, 2002
    Assignee: The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
    Inventors: Ted M. Dawson, Joseph P. Steiner, Valina L. Dawson, George R. Uhl, Solomon H. Snyder
  • Patent number: 6168926
    Abstract: An nNOS associated protein designated PIN-1 (Protein Inhibitor of nNOS) has been identified. It physically interacts with nNOS and inhibits its activity. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that PIN-1 is a regulator of nNOS: it is physiologically associated with nNOS, and it inhibits its catalytic activity. The extraordinary evolutionary conservation of PIN-1 and preliminary evidence that it interacts with multiple proteins, suggests that it may be a major biological regulatory protein influencing numerous physiological processes.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: December 23, 1998
    Date of Patent: January 2, 2001
    Assignee: The Johns Hopkins University
    Inventors: Solomon H. Snyder, Samie R. Jaffrey