Golf swing aid

A golf swing aid has a spiral guide having at least one and a half turns, wherein the spiral guide is coupled to a base via a spiral guide support structure, and wherein the support structure is configured such that the handedness of the spiral guide can be changed to accommodate both, left-handed and right-handed players. Alternatively, the spiral guide may also include a right-handed spiral portion and a left-handed spiral portion. In further preferred aspects, the support structure also allows adjustment of the pitch, angle, and height of the spiral guide.

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Description

This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional patent application with the Ser. No. 60/516,249, which was filed Oct. 31, 2003, and which is incorporated by reference herein.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The field of the invention is sport and training equipment, particularly as it relates to golf.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The game of golf enjoys tremendous popularity and provides many players with both a relaxing and physically challenging experience. However, despite the seemingly relatively simple task of hitting a ball with a club to direct the ball to a target, most players require extensive practice to achieve an at least somewhat satisfactory level of proficiency. There are numerous practice methods and devices known in the art to improve a player's proficiency, however, all or almost all of them suffer from one or more disadvantages.

For example, some players hire a professional that provides instant analysis and feedback to the player on his or her stance, swing, etc. While personal supervision provides numerous advantages (e.g., objective evaluation of progress, identification of particular deficiencies, etc.), hiring a personal pro is often relatively expensive. Alternatively, a player may videotape his or her stance or swing to identify elements in need of correction. Videotaping is generally less expensive than a personal trainer, allows repetitive review of a single swing, and may even be performed in slow motion. However, videotaping requires recognition of an improper posture, grip, stance, or swing by the player, thereby significantly reducing the chances of identifying a mistake as compared to a personal trainer. Moreover, none of the above options provide for a guided motion that helps develop proper muscle memory. To overcome at least some of problems associated with video feedback and/or personal trainers, various devices may be employed to assist a player in performing the proper sequence of movements.

For example, movement or posture of a player may be controlled by a relatively simple apparatus that is attached to the player as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,126,554 to Poscente, or U.S. patent applications 2003/0176227 to Czaja, and 2003/0134685 to Piatt. Alternatively, a player may be at least partially coupled to a stationary swing trainer as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,402,633 to Hsiung, or in U.S. Pat. No. 6,551,196 to Kossner et al. However, such devices are often cumbersome to wear, or need to be adjusted from one person to the next. Moreover, such devices typically fail to correct an improper grip or swing, and therefore tend to reinforce mistakes.

In other examples, known swing trainers include a frame to which a golf club is movably coupled to thereby guide the club along a desired path. Examples for such devices include those described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,364,786 to Khano, U.S. Pat. No. 5,895,327 to Francisco, or in U.S. patent application 2003/0114238 to Meneghini. These devices typically provide proper guidance for a desired swing, however, various disadvantages remain. Among other things, the swing is neither initiated nor finished in a motion that resembles a natural swing since the player is forced to insert the club into the device, or to engage with the club after insertion into the swing trainer.

In still further examples, a swing trainer includes a ring element along which the club is guided during the swing as described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,949,974 to Bellagamba; U.S. Pat. No. 4,928,974 to VanKirk; U.S. Pat. No. 5,441,275 to Yoshishita; U.S. Pat. No. 5,816,932 to Alexander; and U.S. Pat. No. 6,273,826 to Bauer. Similarly, arcuate elements may be employed as guiding structures as described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,071,251 and 4,280,701 to Beckish; and in U.S. Pat. No. 3,730,531 to Zega. While circular or arcuate support often provides guidance along the plane that is immediately below the swing path of the club, there is no guidance along a plane that is immediately above the swing path of the club.

Thus, if a player practices a swing without wishing to continuously contact the circular or arcuate support with his or her club, feedback indicating an improper swing is only provided in one plane (i.e., the plane that is immediately below the swing path of the club).

Alternatively, as described in published U.S. patent application No. 2002/0115496 to Day et al., a practice device may include two flexible elements in arcuate and parallel configuration that are connected in a fixed relationship to each other via a pair of terminal connectors. To practice a swing, a player inserts his or her club in the space defined between the flexible elements and connectors, and the club will then move between the flexible elements. While such a device provides some guidance of the club by two elements, various disadvantages remain. Among other things, a swing can typically neither initiated nor finished in a motion that resembles a natural swing since the player is forced to insert the club between the flexible elements prior to initiation or completion of a swing. Moreover, since the guide elements are flexible, smooth guidance of a club will tend to deteriorate as the elements are repeatedly bent among various curvatures. Still further, due to the flexible nature of the guide elements, true parallel configuration of the two elements will be difficult to achieve. Alternatively, as described by Sciarrillo in U.S. Pat. No. 4,040,633, a helical guide element is provided to lead the club along a predefined path. While such configuration advantageously overcomes at least some of the problems associated with Day's device, new difficulties arise. Among other things, the helical guide of Sciarrillo requires a relatively intricate support structure that makes adjustment of the pitch and rail distance difficult. Worse yet, once configured for a right-handed player, the swing trainer of Sciarrillo is unusable for a left-handed player.

Thus, although various practice devices for improving or forming a proper golf swing are known in the art, all or almost all of them suffer from one or more disadvantages. Therefore, there is still a need to provide improved practice devices.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a golf swing aid having a base that is coupled to a spiral guide via a spiral guide support structure. In contemplated devices, the handedness of the spiral guide can be changed to thereby render the swing aid usable for both, left-handed and right-handed players.

In one aspect of the inventive subject matter, a golf swing aid includes a spiral guide having at least one and a half turns, and a base coupled to the spiral guide by a spiral guide support structure, wherein the spiral guide support structure is configured to retain the spiral guide in at least a first configuration and a second configuration, wherein the spiral guide has a right-handed spiral configuration in the first configuration, and a left-handed spiral configuration in the second configuration, and wherein the spiral guide remains coupled to the spiral guide support structure while the spiral guide is changed from the first configuration into the second configuration.

In particularly preferred swing aids, the spiral guide support structure is further configured to change attitude of the spiral guide, configured to change pitch of the spiral guide, and/or configured to allow vertical movement of the spiral guide relative to the base. In such swing aids, it is especially preferred that the coupling of the spiral guide to the spiral guide support structure comprises a pair of connectors that is rotatably coupled to the spiral guide at opposing positions. Optionally, a third connector can be coupled to the spiral guide at a position between the pair of connectors. Furthermore, where desirable, a retaining clamp is removably coupled to one end of the spiral guide and further coupled to the base and/or the spiral guide support structure.

In another aspect of the inventive subject matter, a golf swing aid includes a spiral guide that is coupled to a spiral guide support structure, wherein the spiral guide support structure is configured to allow change of the spiral guide from a right-handed configuration to a left-handed configuration while the spiral guide is coupled to the spiral guide support structure. Most preferably, the spiral guide support structure is rotatably coupled to the spiral guide, wherein the rotatable coupling of to the spiral guide to the spiral guide support structure comprises two (optionally telescoping) connectors that are disposed on opposing positions of the spiral guide. In at least some of the preferred swing aids, the spiral guide is further coupled to a connector clamp that fixes a distance between a first portion and a second portion of the spiral guide.

Alternatively, contemplated golf swing aids also include a spiral guide that includes a first portion with a right-handed spiral configuration and a second portion with a left-handed spiral configuration, and wherein the spiral guide is movably coupled to a spiral guide support structure. In such devices it is especially preferred that at least one of the first portion and the second portion has at least one and a half turns. Most preferably, the movably coupling of the spiral guide comprises a pivotal coupling in which the spiral guide pivots relative to a spiral axis.

Consequently, a method of providing exercise equipment will include a step in which a swing trainer is provided, wherein the swing trainer has a spiral guide having a handedness. In another step, an instruction to change the handedness is provided to thereby change the swing trainer from use for a right-handed player to use for a left-handed player. As in at least some of the preferred aspects above, the spiral guide is advantageously coupled to a base via a spiral guide support structure (e.g., on at least two opposing points of the spiral guide). In still further preferred aspects of contemplated methods, the spiral guide support structure is configured to allow at least one of a vertical movement, a pivotal movement (attitude), and a swiveling movement (pitch) of the spiral guide relative to the base. An additional instruction may also be provided to couple at least one of the ends of the spiral guide to a retaining clamp.

Various objects, features, aspects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

FIG. 1 is a top view of one exemplary device according to the inventive subject matter in which the handedness of the spiral guide is changeable.

FIG. 2 is a top view of another exemplary device according to the inventive subject matter in which the spiral guide has a right-handed spiral portion and a left-handed spiral portion.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The inventor discovered that a golf swing practice device may be configured such that a club of a player is guided by and/or between a pair of guide elements, wherein the guide elements are configured such that the club can freely enter and/or exit a channel formed by the guide elements. Most preferably, the pair of guide elements is formed by a spiral guide that provides a channel for guidance on the back swing, and that provides a single rail for guidance on at least one of the impact position with the golf ball and the follow-through swing.

Therefore, in one particularly preferred aspect of the inventive subject matter, a golf swing aid has a spiral guide with at least one, more preferably at least one and a quarter, and most preferably at least one and a half turns. A base (e.g., plate with artificial lawn) is coupled to the spiral guide by a spiral guide support structure, wherein the spiral guide support structure is configured to retain the spiral guide in at least a first configuration and a second configuration, wherein the spiral guide has a right-handed spiral configuration in the first configuration, and a left-handed spiral configuration in the second configuration, and wherein the spiral guide remains coupled to the spiral guide support structure while the spiral guide is changed from the first configuration into the second configuration. The term “right-handed spiral configuration” as used herein refers to a spiral in which the spiral-forming material is wound in a clockwise fashion. Similarly, the term “left-handed spiral configuration” as used herein refers to a spiral in which the spiral-forming material is wound in a counter-clockwise fashion. Viewed from another perspective, contemplated devices will include a spiral guide that is coupled to a spiral guide support structure, wherein the spiral guide support structure is configured to allow change of the spiral guide from a right-handed configuration to a left-handed configuration while the spiral guide is coupled to the spiral guide support structure.

One exemplary device according to the inventive subject matter is depicted in the golf swing aid 100 of FIG. 1. Here, spiral guide 110 is coupled via spiral guide support structures 120 to base plate 130. The spiral guide 110 has preferably about one and three quarter turns, and a diameter of about 50-60 inches. The spiral is preferably formed from light-weight metal tubing and is positioned such that one end 110A is at or near the position where the club head impacts the golf ball (not shown). The position of the other end 110B is predominantly determined by the amount of turns present in the spiral guide. Connector clamp 112 maintains the distance between two turns of spiral guide 110.

The spiral guide support structures 120 preferably comprise a post 122 that is coupled to the base plate 130, wherein the post 122 includes rotatable connector 124 to which the spiral guide is coupled (preferably at opposite positions of the spiral guide as shown). Where desirable, the height of connectors 124 can be adjusted relative to the base 130 via corresponding openings or a sliding (and temporarily arrestable) coupling. In the right-handed configuration of the spiral guide as depicted in FIG. 1, the end 110B engages with a retaining clamp 126, while retaining clamp 126′ engages with the spiral guide in the left-handed configuration. Similarly, retaining clamp 128 engages with the spiral guide in a position proximal to end 110A while the spiral guide is in the right-handed configuration, and retaining clamp 128′ engages with the spiral guide in a position proximal to end 110A while the spiral guide is in the left-handed configuration. Such engagement is preferably temporarily to allow switching of the configurations, and may be assisted by snapping, clamping, or otherwise releasably securing the spiral guide to the retaining clamps. The spiral guide may further be stabilized by a third connector 129 that is movably coupled to post 122 and that is movably (or releasably) coupled to the spiral guide. In the device of FIG. 1, switching the spiral guide from the right-handed configuration to the left-handed configuration is effected by detaching end 110B from clamp 126 and end 110A from clamp 128, while maintaining the spiral guide attached to the posts via the connectors 124. The end 110A is then passed through the ring, while end 110B is lifted over connector 124. The ends are then re-attached to the clamps 126′ and 128′ to secure the spiral guide in the-left-handed configuration.

It should be noted that in such devices the connectors 126, 126′, 128, 128′, and 129 may release the spiral guide to allow switching from the right-handed to the left-handed configuration. Thus, the spiral guide 110 may be retained during switching only by rotatable connectors 124. However, if desired, at least one of the connectors 124 may also be releasable. Still further, it should be recognized that the posts 122 may be adjusted in one or more dimensions (e.g., via hinge, telescoping element, etc.), and especially preferred adjustments include vertical adjustment to increase or decrease the height of the spiral guide, rotational adjustment to changepitch of the spiral guide.

Alternatively, and especially where it is not desired that the handedness of the spiral guide in the golf swing aid is to be changed, a spiral guide with a first and second portion may be employed, wherein the first portion of the spiral guide has a right-handed spiral configuration and wherein the second portion of the spiral guide has a left-handed spiral configuration. Most preferably, the spiral guide in such devices is movably (e.g., pivotable) coupled to a spiral guide support structure.

Thus, as depicted in FIG. 2, another exemplary golf swing aid 200 has a spiral guide 210 that is coupled to the base plate 230 via spiral guide support structures 220, wherein the spiral guide 210 has a first portion 210A with right-handed spiral configuration and a second portion 210B with left-handed spiral configuration. Portions 210A and 210B are coupled together by (optional) linker 212, and the spiral guide 210 is coupled to the spiral guide support structure via rotatable coupling 222, which is preferably (but not necessarily) coupled to all turns of the spiral guide. In still further preferred aspects of such devices, it is contemplated that rotatable coupling 222 may also be configured to provide translational, swiveling, and/or pivoting movement of the spiral guide relative to the base (or other immobile reference point on the ground) to adjust position, height, attitude, and/or pitch of the spiral guide relative to the base. Moreover, and especially where the rotatable coupling 222 engages with all turns of the spiral guide, the distance between the turns of the spiral guide may also be adjusted to a desired measure using the rotatable coupling.

The spiral guide in especially preferred swing aids with a spiral guide having changeable handedness has a circular and regular spiral shape with radius of between about 24 inches to about 60 inches, has one and three quarter turns, and is manufactured from TEFLON (DuPont Company trademark for polytetrafluoroethylene)-coated metal tubing (outer diameter typically ½ inch). Similarly, the spiral guide in especially preferred swing aids with a spiral guide having two or more portions with opposite handedness has a circular and regular spiral shape with a radius of between about 24 inches to about 60 inches, wherein at least one portion has at least one and a half turns, and wherein at least another portion has a half turn or more. As above, such spiral guides are preferably manufactured from TEFLON-coated metal tubing with an outer diameter of typically ½ inch. Of course, it should be recognized that numerous alternative coatings may be employed (e.g., impact resistant synthetic polymers), or that the coating is entirely omitted.

In further contemplated aspects, it should be appreciated that the shape of the spiral guide (or portion thereof) may vary considerably. For example, and where desirable, the spiral guide need not be limited to a circular shape but may include at least an ellipsoid portion, or an irregularly shaped portion (e.g., to signal end of back swing or follow-through). Likewise, the radius need not be restricted to a range of about 24 inches to about 60 inches, but may also be smaller, especially where children use the swing aid. On the other hand, oversized versions (i.e., with a radius greater than 60 inches) may be used where relatively large adults wish to practice with a driver. Depending on the particular configuration, it is typically preferred that the spiral guide has between one turn and less than two turns, especially where the handedness of the spiral guide is to be changed. On the other hand, in devices with two portions of opposite handedness in the spiral guide, it should be recognized that the number of turns is less critical. For example, while one portion may have between one full turn and several full turns (e.g., three, or more), the other portion may have less than one turn (e.g., half turn, or three quarter of a turn) to several full turns.

It is also contemplated that the turns of the spiral guide will be separated by at least a quarter of an inch to about 15 inches, and most preferably between 1 inch and 5 inches. Of course, it should be recognized that the distance between the turns may be adjustable using a clamp or other device that temporarily retains the distance at a predetermined measure. Such clamp or other device may be coupled to the spiral guide in one or more locations, and/or may be integrated into the spiral guide support structure. Therefore, the distance between the turns of the spiral guide may be predetermined at a constant, increasing, and/or decreasing distance. Where the spiral guide has two portions with opposite handedness, it is contemplated that the coupling of the two portions may vary considerably, and all known manners of coupling are deemed suitable for use herein. For example, the first and second portions may be permanently, detachably, or integrally coupled to each other, wherein such coupling may determine at least in part the distance of two spiral guide turns. With respect to the adjustability of the distance of two or more turns, the same considerations as above apply.

With respect to the material of the spiral guides, it should be appreciated that the choice of material will at least in part depend on the type of spiral guide. For example, where the handedness of the spiral guide is to be changed, suitable materials will provide some flexibility to allow movement of one turn across the other turn. Among other materials, metal tubing or a solid polymer (e.g., polyethylene, carbon fibers) may be particularly appropriate. On the other hand, where the spiral guide has two portions with opposite handedness, suitable materials may be less flexible, and therefore include steel, metal tubing, and relatively hard polymers (e.g., metal reinforced polycarbonate). Thus, suitable materials for spiral guides generally include numerous synthetic polymers, metals, wood, and all reasonable combinations thereof. It is still further contemplated that the spiral guide element may comprise multiple detachable sections that can be disassembled for storage or moving the swing aid, or for adjusting the shape of the spiral guide. End pieces (preferably angled) may advantageously be coupled to one or both guide elements to facilitate entry of the club when the upswing is not properly executed.

Especially preferred spiral guide support structures will at least temporarily support the spiral guide in one of a plurality of desired positions without obstructing the path formed between the turns, and further allow switching or movement of the spiral guide from a right-handed spiral configuration to a left-handed spiral configuration (and vice versa). Most preferably, the spiral guide support structure is configured such that switching or movement of the spiral guide can be performed without completely detaching the spiral guide from the spiral guide support structure. It is further preferred that the support structure is coupled to a base (e.g., a base plate with artificial lawn), in which one or more elements of the spiral guide support structure (e.g., posts) are optionally movably and/or detachably coupled to the base. The term “base” as used herein refers to an immobile object or surface. For example, a wall, ceiling, platform, or the ground (e.g., floor, concrete slab, soil, etc.) are considered a base under the definition provided herein.

Still further, it should be recognized that the spiral guide support structure is preferably configured such that a user can independently alter at least one, more typically at least two, and even more typically at least three of the height of the spiral guide relative to the base, the attitude of the spiral guide, the pitch of the spiral guide, and the distance of at least one turn of the spiral guide relative to another turn of the spiral guide. The term “attitude of the spiral guide” as used herein refers to the angle that is formed at the intersection of the spiral axis and an imaginary vertical line passing through the base. The term “pitch of the spiral guide” as used herein refers to the angle that is formed at the intersection of the spiral axis and an imaginary horizontal line that is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the base (as depicted in FIG. 2—dashed line). Thus, in most cases the pitch is adjusted to promote either a left to right ball flight (fade) or a right to left ball flight (draw).

Adjustability of the spiral in height can be achieved in numerous manners, and all known manners are deemed suitable herein. However, it is generally preferred that the spiral guide support structure includes at least one telescoping post to which the spiral guide is movably coupled. In other embodiments, a telescoping Y-shaped post may be employed, wherein the spiral guide is coupled to and between the upper arms of the Y. Height adjustment may also be implemented in non-telescoping manners, including coupling the spiral guide to the post(s) or other support via a slidable connector, or by providing multiple vertically spaced coupling points to the post(s) or support.

Similarly, the pitch may be adjusted in numerous manners. For example, one or more posts or other support structure may be rotatably coupled to the base. Alternatively, and especially where the pitch angle is relatively small (e.g., 15 degrees), the posts need not be rotatably coupled, but may remain stationary while the connector that couples the post to the spiral guide may pivot relative to the post and/or may be telescoping. With respect to the coupling of the spiral guide to the post(s), it is generally preferred that the coupling is at least rotatable, and that the coupling to the spiral guide will not interfere with the channel formed between two turns. For example, coupling of the spiral guide to the connectors could be via a bracket or pin that is inserted into the spiral guide, wherein two connectors are coupled on opposite ends of the spiral guide.

Where desirable, and especially where the handedness of the spiral guide is changed, one or more retaining clamps may be coupled to posts or other support to at least temporarily retain the ends or terminal portions (i.e., equal or less than half a turn) of the spiral guide. Typically, the retaining clamps will releasably engage with a portion of the spiral guide to maintain stability and handedness in the desired position. Releasable engagement can be done in various manners well known in the art, and suitable manners include snap connectors, belt connectors, screw- or splint-type fasteners, and so on. In such configurations, and especially where it is desired that the attitude remains changeable, the post may be pivotable, or include a swiveling element to which the connector and retaining clamps are coupled. Additional connectors may be provided as needed and will typically be releasably coupled to at least one of the post and the spiral guide.

It should still further be recognized that movement of the spiral guide may be automated, and in especially preferred aspects of the inventive subject matter, a plurality of electric actuators (most typically electric motors) may be used to change at least one of the height, attitude, pitch, and distance between two turns. For example, a user control panel may include one or more input devices that control the actuators to adjust the spiral guide to a predetermined or previously programmed position. Alternatively, user-specific settings may be provided to the control panel via a user code or ID card.

In alternative and less preferred aspects of the inventive subject matter, two or more independent guide elements may be configured to form a semicircle or other arcuate shape and have an adjustable attitude of about 45-85 degrees, more preferably 65-80 degrees (relative to the position of the player), an adjustable pitch of between about ±45 degrees, more preferably about ±30 degrees. It is further generally preferred that the independent guide elements are coupled to a support structure in a manner that allows adjustment of at least one of the attitude, the pitch and the distance between the guide elements. Exemplary devices with independent guide elements are described in more detail in our provisional patent application with Ser. No. 60/516,249, which is incorporated by reference herein.

Thus, specific embodiments and applications of golf swing aids have been disclosed. It should be apparent, however, to those skilled in the art that many more modifications besides those already described are possible without departing from the inventive concepts herein. The inventive subject matter, therefore, is not to be restricted except in the spirit of the appended claims. Moreover, in interpreting both the specification and the claims, all terms should be interpreted in the broadest possible manner consistent with the context. In particular, the terms “comprises” and “comprising” should be interpreted as referring to elements, components, or steps in a non-exclusive manner, indicating that the referenced elements, components, or steps may be present, or utilized, or combined with other elements, components, or steps that are not expressly referenced. Furthermore, where a definition or use of a term in a reference, which is incorporated by reference herein is inconsistent or contrary to the definition of that term provided herein, the definition of that term provided herein applies and the definition of that term in the reference does not apply.

Claims

1. A golf swing aid, comprising:

a spiral guide having at least one and a half turns, and a base coupled to the spiral guide by a spiral guide support structure;
wherein the spiral guide support structure is configured to retain the spiral guide in at least a first configuration and a second configuration;
wherein the spiral guide has a right-handed spiral configuration in the first configuration, and a left-handed spiral configuration in the second configuration; and
wherein the spiral guide support structure is configured such that the spiral guide remains coupled to the spiral guide support structure while the spiral guide is changed from the first configuration into the second configuration.

2. The golf swing aid of claim 1 wherein the spiral guide support structure is further configured to allow pivoting movement of the spiral guide relative to the base.

3. The golf swing aid of claim 1 wherein the spiral guide support structure is further configured to allow swiveling movement of the spiral guide relative to the base.

4. The golf swing aid of claim 1 wherein the spiral guide support structure is further configured to allow vertical movement of the spiral guide relative to the base.

5. The golf swing aid of claim 1 wherein the coupling of the spiral guide to the spiral guide support structure comprises a pair of connectors rotatably coupled to the spiral guide at opposing positions.

6. The golf swing aid of claim 5 further comprising a third connector that is coupled to the spiral guide at a position between the pair of connectors.

7. The golf swing aid of claim 5 further comprising a retaining clamp that is removably coupled to one end of the spiral guide, and that is further coupled to at least one of the base and the spiral guide support structure.

8. A golf swing aid comprising a spiral guide coupled to a spiral guide support structure, wherein the spiral guide support structure is configured to allow change of the spiral guide from a right-handed configuration to a left-handed configuration while the spiral guide is coupled to the spiral guide support structure.

9. The golf swing aid of claim 8 wherein the spiral guide support structure is rotatably coupled to the spiral guide.

10. The golf swing aid of claim 9 wherein the rotatable coupling of to the spiral guide to the spiral guide support structure comprises two connectors that are disposed on opposing positions.

11. The golf swing aid of claim 10 wherein the two connectors are telescoping connectors.

12. The golf swing aid of claim 8 wherein the spiral guide is further coupled to a connector clamp that fixes a distance between a first portion and a second portion of the spiral guide.

13. A golf swing aid comprising a spiral guide that includes a first portion with a right-handed spiral configuration and a second portion with a left-handed spiral configuration, and wherein the spiral guide is movably coupled to a spiral guide support structure.

14. The golf swing aid of claim 13 wherein at least one of the first portion and the second portion has at least one and a half turns.

15. The golf swing aid of claim 14 wherein the movably coupling comprises a pivotal coupling in which the spiral guide pivots relative to a spiral axis.

16. A method of providing exercise equipment comprising a step in which a swing trainer is provided, wherein the swing trainer has a spiral guide having a handedness, and further comprising a step of providing an instruction to change the handedness to thereby change the swing trainer from use for a right-handed player to use for a left-handed player.

17. The method of claim 16 wherein the spiral guide has a second handedness, and wherein change is effected by pivoting the spiral guide.

18. The method of claim 16 wherein the spiral guide is coupled to a base via a spiral guide support structure, and wherein the spiral guide support structure is coupled to the spiral guide on at least two points of the spiral guide.

19. The method of claim 18 wherein the at least two points of the spiral guide are on opposing positions on the spiral guide.

20. The method of claim 18 wherein the spiral guide support structure is configured to allow at least one of a vertical movement, a pivotal movement, and a swiveling movement of the spiral guide relative to the base.

Patent History

Publication number: 20050096145
Type: Application
Filed: Oct 29, 2004
Publication Date: May 5, 2005
Inventor: Robert Barretto (Anaheim, CA)
Application Number: 10/976,541

Classifications

Current U.S. Class: 473/257.000