MODULAR RADIAL COUNTER SYSTEM

The present disclosure radically departs from conventional teaching and creatively offers a flexible alternative to the orthogonal arrangement. The present disclosure provides a system of modular counters that can be mixed to create arrangements shaped as an “S”, “C”, or a multitude of other modular arrangements by mixing predefined toroidal shaped modular radial counters with other modular radial counters and/or modular orthogonal counters. For the present disclosure, such radial arrangements represent a significant change in the accepted understanding of orthogonal counter design. Examples of such flexible radial arrangements are disclosed herein. Despite decades of efforts in this field and the opportunities to design similar modules, the field has simply been absent of such modular radial solutions.

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Description

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Appl. No. 60/747,905, filed May 22, 2006, the contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not applicable.

REFERENCE TO APPENDIX

Not applicable.

BACKGROUND

1. Field of the Invention

The invention relates to food service equipment. More specifically, the invention relates to modular counters.

2. Description of Related Art

The food service industry is almost synonymous with the use of counters. This industry intensely depends on counters to prepare, hold, and serve food for customers, and clean up after the serving of the food. The counters are used to support the initial food preparation and washing, cooking ranges and ventilation hoods, sinks, food service hot and cold wells for maintaining a desired food temperature, holding trays, and dozens of other variations. For example, a well designed counter system with the accompanying appliances can cost over one million dollars in many schools. The counters are so ubiquitous to the food service industry that food service consultants and architects are frequently used to optimize the design and construction of counters for restaurants, schools and universities, and other commercial establishments.

Current counters use well established designs and arrangements that have been developed and optimized for decades. The counters generally have rectangular or square patterns to optimize usage and floor space, such as wall space in a rectangular room. This typical arrangement can be characterized as an “orthogonal” arrangement in that the counters are spaced relative to each other in a grid pattern of X-Y dimensions. Frequently, the size and arrangement of the counters are customized for specific facilities with precise dimensions tailored for the facility. In recent years, some efforts have been made to create modules that can be assembled in different arrangements, so that the placement of certain counters could be varied for the particular application with minimal customization. However, even the modules have the orthogonal arrangement following conventional wisdom. To fit the orthogonal arrangement, the counters are most frequently designed with right angles to be attached to adjacent counters and continue the straight line or right angle orientations of a set of counters in the orthogonal arrangement.

Thus, it is of significant moment in the industry when an original idea for counter design occurs, because it departs from the well understood and accepted knowledge of current counter designs developed over decades.

BRIEF SUMMARY

The present disclosure radically departs from conventional teaching and creatively offers a flexible alternative to the orthogonal arrangement. The present disclosure provides a system of modular counters that can be mixed to create arrangements shaped as an “S”, “C”, or a multitude of other modular arrangements by mixing predefined toroidal shaped modular radial counters with other modular radial counters and/or modular orthogonal counters. For the present disclosure, such radial arrangements represent a significant change in the accepted understanding of orthogonal counter design. Examples of such flexible radial arrangements are disclosed herein. Despite decades of efforts in this field and the opportunities to design similar modules, the field has simply been absent of such modular radial solutions.

The disclosure provides a modular radial counter system comprising: a first modular radial counter comprising: a structural support system; a countertop coupled to the support system having an inner first arcuate surface having a first radius with a first origin in space and an outer second arcuate surface having a second radius with a second origin in space, and a first end and a second end coupled to the countertop, each end being radially aligned to project toward a convergence substantially at the origin of at least one of the radii. A method of using the modular radial counter system is also disclosed comprising: positioning the first modular radial counter so that the origins of the first modular radial counter are disposed toward a first side of the system, and positioning a second modular radial counter adjacent an end of the first modular radial counter so that the origins of the second modular radial counter are disposed toward a second side of the system different from the first side. The method can also comprise positioning a second modular radial counter adjacent an end of the first modular radial counter so that the origins of the first modular radial counter and the origins of the second modular radial counter are disposed toward a common side of the system.

The disclosure further provides a modular radial counter system comprising: a first modular radial counter comprising: a structural support system; a countertop coupled to the support system having an inner first arcuate surface having a first radius with a first origin in space and an outer second arcuate surface having a second radius with a second origin in space, and a first end and a second end coupled to the countertop, each end being radially aligned to project toward a convergence substantially at the origin of at least one of the radii; and a second modular radial counter coupled to the first modular radial counter, the second modular radial counter comprising: a structural support system; a countertop coupled to the support system having an inner first arcuate surface having a first radius with a first origin in space and an outer second arcuate surface having a second radius with a second origin in space, and a first end and a second end coupled to the countertop, each end being radially aligned to project toward a convergence substantially at the origin of at least one of the radii, the system being adapted to form an “S” shape by an arrangement of the counters defined by the origins of the first modular radial counter disposed toward a first side of the system and the origins of the second modular radial counter disposed toward a second side of the system different from the first side, and the same system being adapted to form a “C” shape by an alternative arrangement of the counters defined by the origins of the first modular radial counter and the origins of the second modular radial counter disposed toward a common side of the system.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

While the concepts provided herein are susceptible to various modifications and alternative forms, only a few specific embodiments have been shown by way of example in the drawings and are described in detail below. The figures and detailed descriptions of these specific embodiments are not intended to limit the breadth or scope of the concepts or the appended claims in any manner. Rather, the figures and detailed written descriptions are provided to illustrate the concepts to a person of ordinary skill in the art as required by 35 U.S.C. §112.

FIG. 1 is a schematic top view of an exemplary arrangement of a modular radial counter system.

FIG. 2 is a schematic front elevation view of an exemplary modular radial counter system.

FIG. 3 is a schematic rear elevation view of an exemplary modular radial counter system.

FIG. 4 is a schematic top view of an exemplary generic modular radial counter.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of a modular radial counter.

FIG. 6 is a schematic top view of an exemplary arrangement of at least two modular radial counters.

FIG. 7 is a schematic top view of an exemplary modular orthogonal counter.

FIG. 8 is a schematic top view of an exemplary arrangement of at least one modular radial counter coupled with at least one modular orthogonal counter.

FIG. 9 is a schematic top view of another exemplary embodiment illustrating a different arrangement of the modular counter system shown in FIG. 8.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

One or more illustrative embodiments of the concepts disclosed herein are presented below. Not all features of an actual implementation are described or shown in this application for the sake of clarity. It is understood that the development of an actual embodiment, numerous implementation-specific decisions must be made to achieve the developer's goals, such as compliance with system-related, business-related and other constraints, which vary by implementation and from time to time. While a developer's efforts might be complex and time-consuming, such efforts would be, nevertheless, a routine undertaking for those of ordinary skill in the art having benefit of this disclosure.

FIG. 1 is a schematic top view of an exemplary arrangement of modular radial counter system. The modular radial counter system 2 can include one or more modular radial counters 4, 30, 60. The system can further include modular radial counters coupled to modular orthogonal counters described below. The counters can be arranged end to end to form various shapes and arrangements that heretofore has not been possible.

The modular radial counter 4 includes a structural support system 6 and a countertop 8 coupled to the support system 6. The structural support system 6 can include ribs, channels, panels, tubes, pipe, plates and other support members as may be appropriate to the particular needs and uses of the counter. In some embodiments, the support system 6 can include arcuate members to align with the arcuate surfaces of the countertop described below. Structural members can be bent or otherwise formed into such arcuate shapes as appropriate. Other members of the support system 6 can be straight such as vertical members, or end pieces.

A countertop 8 can be coupled to the support system 6. The countertop 8 generally is shaped in the modular radial counter 4 with a first arcuate surface 10 shape having a first radius 12 with a first origin 14 that projects into space distal from the first arcuate surface. Similarly, the radial counter 4 includes an outer second arcuate surface 16 that likewise has a second radius 18 with a second origin 20. The term “arcuate surface” is used broadly and can include a curved surface having a radius, or a plurality of faceted surfaces that resemble a curved surface and about which an arc having a radius can be circumscribed. Further, the term “origin” is used to describe in geometric terms the location of a starting point of a radius of an arcuate surface. The term “origin” would include a center of an arc where multiple perpendicular lines drawn from tangents on the arc surface intersect each other. However, it is to be understood that the term “origin” used herein is not limited to an exact theoretical point of a given geometric arc, since manufacturing tolerances in creating an arcuate surface may vary the exact intersection of the various perpendicular lines drawn from the tangents along the arc surface, and thus would represent a region of points as would be typical in manufacturing processes used to create an arcuate surface.

The countertop 8 further includes a first end 22 and a second end 24. The ends are generally coupled to the countertop and can be solid or open and generally provide support to strengthen the countertop 8. In other embodiments, the ends 22, 24 can simply represent the start and finish planes of the radial counter 4. For example, the countertop 8 could be cantilevered with no actual support structure at the end if desired. Whether a physical structure or a representation of the termination points of the counter, each end is generally radially aligned to project toward a conversion substantially at the origin of at least one of the radii of the first arcuate surface or the second arcuate surface. Thus, the modular radial counter can represent a portion of a toroid having a common origin. In such instance, the first arcuate surface and the second arcuate surface with their respective origins would converge to a common point as illustrated. The radial counter 4 can be arranged so that the origins, described above, converge on one side 26 of the radial counter system, where the sides are defined by a line 50 that follows the arcuate surfaces through the approximate center of the plurality of radial counters. Thus, a first side 26 is defined on one side of the line 50 and a second side 27 is defined on a side distal from the first side 26 relative to the line.

The radial counter 4 can include other elements as may be appropriate or desired. For example, a tray rest 28 can be formed on one or both sides of the radial counter to support food trays, cookware, products, and other items. The radial counter 4 can further be used to support various members that are useful to the food service or other industries. For example, without limitation, the radial counter 4 can include a display shelf 52. The display shelf 52 can be positioned on top of the countertop 8 or can be at least partially inserted therethrough so that radial counter 4 will include one or more openings formed through the 8 to accommodate the various members.

A second modular radial counter 30 can likewise be described. For example, the modular radial counter 30 generally includes a countertop 32 having a first arcuate surface 34 with a first radius 36 and a first origin 38 for the radius 36. Similarly, the modular radial counter 30 includes an outer second arcuate surface 40 having a second radius 42 with a second origin 44. In at least this embodiment, the origins 38, 44 converged to a common point. Further, the modular radial counter 30 includes a first end 46 and a second end 48. For example, the second end 24 of the radial counter 4 can be coupled to the first end 46 of the second modular radial counter 32. As described below, in such arrangement, the system forms an “S” shape so that the origins of the first modular radial counter 4 are directed toward the first side 26 of the system and the origins of the second modular radial counter 32 are directed toward the second side 27 of the system. As further illustrated below, the radial counter 32 can be rotated 180° so that the origins are directed to the first side 26. In such instance, the system could be described as a “C” shape. The flexibility of this modular radial counter system allows various combinations of various modules to create a variety of shapes. Part of the uniqueness of the system is that the ends are radially aligned to project toward a convergence at an origin which allows the counters to be coupled to other counters in interchangeable radial arrangements.

The modular radial counter 32 can further include a tray rest 58 similar to tray rest 28 except that the tray rest 58 is disposed along the outer second arcuate surface 40 of the counter 32. The radial counter 32 can include a variety of additional elements depending on its purpose in the radial counter system. For example, without limitation, the counter 32 can include one or more openings into which one or more food service wells 54 can be inserted. For hygienic reasons, a breath protector 56 can be disposed over the food service wells 54, as is known in the industry.

A third modular radial counter is shown for illustration and can be similarly described as the first and second occurred modular radial counters described above. In an exemplary embodiment, the third modular radial counter 60 can include a refrigerated or heated display case 62. Without limitation, the display case can include chilled items, such as drinks, salads, desserts, and other fruit products that may benefit from refrigeration, or heated items such as hot sandwiches, meat products and other cooked items. Depending on the orientation of the first, second, and third modular radial counters, the arrangement can create an “S” shape appearance as shown. Alternatively, the modular radial counter 60 can be turned around and inverted relative to the modular radial counter 32 to create a “C” shape between the two counters 34, 60, and an “S“shape created between the radial counters 4, 34. Further, all counters can be rotated so that the origins were on one side of the system to extend the “C” shape. If the counters have sufficient length, or additional counters are included, the counters can form an “O“shape with substantially complete circle or oval.

FIG. 2 is a schematic front elevation view of an exemplary modular radial counter system. The radial counter system 2 can include one or more of the modules described in FIG. 1, including the first modular radial counter 4, the second modular radial counter 30, and the third modular radial counter 60. In at least one embodiment, one or more of the radial counters can include wheels 78, such as casters or other rolling elements, to facilitate movement of the counters. The counters can include decorative coverings such as along one or more sides 102. The coverings can include tile, stainless steel, plastic, and other coverings known to those in the field. Lighting (not shown) can also be provided to the counters to highlight different items on the counters or in the counters. The tray rests 28, 58 can be disposed at heights appropriate to the counter and are generally co-planer relative to each other. The display shelf 52 can be provided with the counter 4 that can display open food items that are heated, cooled, or ambient temperature. A breath protector 56 can be provided with a counter, such as counter 30, that can provide hygienic protection for food items offered for consumption. A display case 62 can be provided with counter 60.

FIG. 3 is a schematic rear elevation view of an exemplary modular radial counter system. The modular radial counter system 2 can have decorative panels or can be open for easy access as may be appropriate for particular embodiments. In general, the radial counters include a structural support system 6. The counter 4 can include the countertop 8, module 30 can include the countertop 32, and countertop 61 can include the countertop 61. The wheels 78 can facilitate movement of the counters to the various locations, as well as facilitate rotation with the modules for coupling to other modules. In some cases, the modulars can include a refrigeration system (not shown) in conjunction with a display unit, such as a display shelf 52, a display case 52, or other units. Likewise, a heating system can be used. A plumbing system 84 can be used to provide water, such as to steam trays, or drainage for iced food wells disposed in the radial counter, or for other uses. A breath protector 56 can include a support 80 with one or more glass panels 82 to protect the food during distribution to customers.

FIG. 4 is a schematic top view of an exemplary generic modular radial counter. In at least one embodiment, the modular radial counter 64 represents a base model of the different variations of other embodiments of the modular redial counters 4, 30, 60. In similar fashion as has been described above, the generic modular radial counter 64 includes a countertop 70, and a support structure 6 for supporting the countertop 70. The radial counter 64 includes a first arcuate surface 66 and a second arcuate surface 68. Each arcuate surface has a radius with an origin. In at least one embodiment, the radii of the arcuate surfaces converged to a common point 76. Further, the generic modular radial counter 64 includes a first end 72 and a second end 74 where the ends are disposed in radial alignment toward the common point 76. Thus, the modular radial counter 64 forms a section of a toroid. A tray rest 71 can be coupled to the modular radial counter 64 with a support 90.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of a modular radial counter. The modular radial counter 64 generally includes a support system 6 with a countertop 70 coupled thereto. The countertop 70 can include a tray rest 71 that can be coupled to the counter 64 with a support 90. The counter can include various panels and decorative walls on a front or other surface, as a decorative panel as may be appropriate for the situation. A back side of the radial counter 64 can also include panels or doors, or be open for easy access to shelf space and other items under the countertop 70. The support system 6 can further include a support layer 104 under the countertop 70 to support the countertop. The support layer includes a structural member or members. The end 72 of the counter 64 can be enclosed or opened as may be desired and applicable to the particular configuration.

FIG. 6 is a schematic top view of an exemplary arrangement of at least two modular radial counters. In this exemplary arrangement, the first modular radial counter 4 is arranged end to end with the second modular radial counter 30, so that collectively the system forms a shape that can be described as “C”. Thus, the radii of the first and second arcuate surfaces 10, 16 of the counter 4 correlate with the first and second arcuate surfaces 34, 40 of the second modular radial counter 30 to form a collectively longer arcuate surface. In at least one embodiment, therefore, the origins 14, 20, 38, 44 of the radii of each radial counter converge on the side 26 of the system 2.

As noted above regarding FIG. 1, the radial counters 4, 30 can be rotated 180° relative to each other to form an “S” shape. For the particular configuration, the tray rest that can be associated with each radial counter may need to be substituted for a longer or shorter tray rest as may be appropriate to the particular side to be used in the system.

FIG. 7 is a schematic top view of an exemplary modular orthogonal counter. FIG. 7A is a schematic top view of another exemplary modular orthogonal counter. FIGS. 7 and 7A will be described in conjunction with each other. The system 2 further includes one or more modular orthogonal counters 92. In general, the modular orthogonal counter 92 will include a first end 94, a second end 96, a front 98, and a back 100. Generally, at least one of the angles of a side and front or back are formed at a right angle. Similarly, the ends 94, 96 can be parallel to each other and perpendicular to at least the front 98, the back 100, or a combination thereof However, the modular orthogonal counter 92 could include a curved surface such as a corner piece shown in the corollary FIG. 7A. In such case, the ends 94 and 96 would adjacent to each other and formed at right angles. Thus, a modular orthogonal counter 92 as described herein includes at least two adjacent surfaces formed at right angles generally along at least a portion of their length.

FIG. 8 is a schematic top view of an exemplary arrangement of at least one modular radial counter coupled with at least one modular orthogonal counter. In the arrangement shown, the first modular radial counter 4 can be coupled with the orthogonal counter 92 by coupling the ends of each module together. Further, the second modular radial counter 30 can be coupled with the other end of the modular orthogonal counter 92. Such arrangement could be described as an elongated “C” shape, where one portion is elongated from use of the modular orthogonal counter 92 and the radial counters 4, 30 are coupled to each end of the modular orthogonal counter. Alternatively, the second modular radial counter could be coupled to the other end of the first modular radial counter. Such arrangement could be described as an elongated “J” shape, where one portion is elongated from use of the modular orthogonal counter 92 and the radial counters 4, 30 are coupled together.

FIG. 9 is a schematic top view of another exemplary embodiment illustrating a different arrangement of the modular counter system shown in FIG. 8. The modular counters shown in FIG. 8 can be coupled in a different arrangement as desired or needed. For example, by rotating one of more of the modular radial counters, such as the radial counter 30, a different shape and arrangement can be made. Such arrangement could be described as an elongated “S” shape. As would be known to those with ordinary skill in the art given the description contained herein, additional shapes can be formed from different combinations of modular radial counters, modular orthogonal counters, or combinations thereof Such combinations could resemble various other shapes, such as a “D” shape with a combination of modular radial counters and orthogonal counters, an “O” shape with multiple radial counters sufficiently completing a circle or oval, a “P” shape, a “U” shape, and other shapes as may be useful or desired. Such flexibility is heretofore not been known to the use of modular systems.

The embodiments shown are generally described in terms of the food service industry and it is believed that the module system will widely be used in such industry. However, the disclosure can be applicable to multiple fields that use counters for various purposes.

The invention has been described in the context of various embodiments and not every embodiment of the invention has been described. Apparent modifications and alterations to the described embodiments are available to those of ordinary skill in the art. The disclosed and undisclosed embodiments are not intended to limit or restrict the scope or applicability of the invention conceived of by the Applicants, but rather, in conformity with the patent laws, Applicants intends to protect all such modifications and improvements to the full extent that such falls within the scope or range of equivalent of the following claims.

The various methods and embodiments of the invention can be included in combination with each other to produce variations of the disclosed methods and embodiments, as would be understood by those with ordinary skill in the art, given the understanding provided herein. Also, various aspects of the embodiments could be used in conjunction with each other to accomplish the understood goals of the invention. Also, the directions such as “top,” “bottom,” “left,” “right,” “upper,” “lower,” and other directions and orientations are described herein for clarity in reference to the figures and are not to be limiting of the actual device or system or use of the device or system. Unless the context requires otherwise, the word “comprise” or variations such as “comprises” or “comprising”, should be understood to imply the inclusion of at least the stated element or step or group of elements or steps or equivalents thereof, and not the exclusion of a greater numerical quantity or any other element or step or group of elements or steps or equivalents thereof The device or system may be used in a number of directions and orientations. The term “coupled,” “coupling,” “coupler,” and like terms are used broadly herein and can include any method or device for securing, binding, bonding, fastening, attaching, joining, inserting therein, forming thereon or therein, communicating, or otherwise associating, for example, mechanically, magnetically, electrically, chemically, directly or indirectly with intermediate elements, one or more pieces of members together and can further include without limitation integrally forming one functional member with another in a unity fashion. The coupling can occur in any direction, including rotationally. Further, the order of steps can occur in a variety of sequences unless otherwise specifically limited. The various steps described herein can be combined with other steps, interlineated with the stated steps, and/or split into multiple steps. Additionally, the headings herein are for the convenience of the reader and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention.

Further, any references mentioned in the application for this patent as well as all references listed in the information disclosure originally filed with the application are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety to the extent such may be deemed essential to support the enabling of the invention. However, to the extent statements might be considered inconsistent with the patenting of the invention, such statements are expressly not meant to be considered as made by the Applicant(s).

Claims

1. A modular radial counter system comprising:

a first modular radial counter comprising: a structural support system; a countertop coupled to the support system having an inner first arcuate surface having a first radius with a first origin in space and an outer second arcuate surface having a second radius with a second origin in space, and a first end and a second end coupled to the countertop, each end being radially aligned to project toward a convergence substantially at the origin of at least one of the radii.

2. The system of claim 1, wherein the first origin and the second origin converge to a common point.

3. The system of claim 1, wherein the system further comprises a plurality of modular radial counters coupled to each other on an end of each counter.

4. The system of claim 3, wherein the system is adapted to form an “S” shape by alternating a position of the radii origins of the radial counters between a first side and a second side of the system.

5. The system of claim 3, wherein the system is adapted to form a “C” shape by positioning a plurality of the modular radial counters with the radii origins on a first side of the system.

6. The system of claim 1, further comprising a first modular orthogonal counter having at least two adjacent surfaces formed at right angles along at least a portion of their length, the first modular orthogonal counter being coupled to the first modular radial counter.

7. The system of claim 6, further comprising a plurality of modular orthogonal counters coupled to at least one modular radial counter.

8. The system of claim 1, further comprising a breath protector coupled to the counter.

9. The system of claim 1, wherein the countertop is formed with at least one opening for a food service or preparation device.

10. The system of claim 1, further comprising a display shelf coupled to the counter.

11. The system of claim 1, further comprising a refrigerated display case coupled to the counter.

12. A method of arranging the modular radial counter system of claim 3, comprising:

positioning the first modular radial counter so that the origins of the first modular radial counter are disposed toward a first side of the system, and
positioning a second modular radial counter adjacent an end of the first radial counter so that the origins of the second modular radial counter are disposed toward a second side of the system different from the first side.

13. A method of arranging the modular radial counter system of claim 3, comprising:

positioning a second modular radial counter adjacent an end of the first radial counter so that the origins of the first modular radial counter and the origins of the second modular radial counter are disposed toward a common side of the system.

14. A modular radial counter system comprising:

a first modular radial counter comprising: a structural support system; a countertop coupled to the support system having an inner first arcuate surface having a first radius with a first origin in space and an outer second arcuate surface having a second radius with a second origin in space, and a first end and a second end coupled to the countertop, each end being radially aligned to project toward a convergence substantially at the origin of at least one of the radii; and
a second modular radial counter coupled to the first modular radial counter, the second modular radial counter comprising: a structural support system; a countertop coupled to the support system having an inner first arcuate surface having a first radius with a first origin in space and an outer second arcuate surface having a second radius with a second origin in space, and a first end and a second end coupled to the countertop, each end being radially aligned to project toward a convergence substantially at the origin of at least one of the radii,
the system being adapted to form an “S” shape by an arrangement of the counters defined by the origins of the first modular radial counter disposed toward a first side of the system and the origins of the second modular radial counter disposed toward a second side of the system different from the first side, and the same system being adapted to form a “C” shape by an alternative arrangement of the counters defined by the origins of the first modular radial counter and the origins of the second modular radial counter disposed toward a common side of the system.

15. The system of claim 14, wherein the first origin and the second origin of each radial counter converge to a common point for each radial counter.

16. The system of claim 14, wherein the system further comprises a third modular radial counter coupled at least one of the first or second modular radial counters.

17. The system of claim 14, further comprising at least one modular orthogonal counter having at least two adjacent surfaces formed at right angles, the orthogonal counter coupled to at least one of the modular radial counters.

18. The system of claim 14, further comprising a breath protector coupled to the counter.

19. The system of claim 14, further comprising a display shelf coupled to the counter.

20. The system of claim 14, further comprising a refrigerated display case coupled to the counter.

Patent History

Publication number: 20070267950
Type: Application
Filed: May 7, 2007
Publication Date: Nov 22, 2007
Applicant: KITCHEN EQUIPMENT FABRICATING COMPANY (Houston, TX)
Inventor: Alvis Lloyd HARTSFIELD (Missouri City, TX)
Application Number: 11/745,312

Classifications

Current U.S. Class: Counters (312/140.1)
International Classification: A47F 9/00 (20060101);