HANDS-FREE TOILET SEAT LIFTER AND KIT THEREFOR

A foot-operated apparatus for lifting and lowering a toilet seat has base support adapted to attach to an existing flooring surface using a loop and hook fastener with an adhesive material allowing the base to be easily installed and easily removed for ease of cleaning the unit and the area around the toilet. A lever foot pedal mounted in the base may be a single unit made of extruded and molded poly carbonate material for durability and corrosion resistance. A push rod pivotally connected to the foot pedal and pivotally connected to the toilet seat lifts and lowers the seat upon foot actuation and release, respectively. A leaf spring disposed in the base under the foot pedal returns the toilet seat to the down position after use. Kits may provide the disassembled parts of the apparatus and written instructions for assembly. Other parts may include a cushion disposed in the base to prevent the toilet seat from slamming down; a decorative cabinet to house the apparatus, appliques on the foot pedal to enhance grip and reduce slippage; and even a sleeve for the foot pedal to provide comfort for bare foot users.

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Description

TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention relates to a toilet seat Lifter and more particularly to a hands-free toilet seat lifter and kits therefore and toilets providing same.

BACKGROUND

Over the years, a fair amount of human ingenuity has been devoted to solving the problem of the toilet seat that was left up. While one would think that such a simple problem should easily yield to the persistence of human efforts, the surprising reality is that virtually no home, office or public facility is equipped with an apparatus that provides a satisfactory solution.

One reason that we do have a toilet seat lowerer is that the solutions that have been, devised so far are all too complicated or too expensive. For instance, some devices have expensive pneumatic mechanisms, others have two many levers, gears, rods and wires.

It would be useful, therefore, to have an apparatus that would allow one to easily lift a toilet seat by foot (without using one's hands) and have the seat always return without slamming to the rim of commode when the lifting mechanism was released. It would also be useful if such an apparatus, was inexpensive, easy to assemble so that any toilet could be retro-fitted with the apparatus, durable so that it could tolerate many uses over the years, and easy to clean and repair.

SUMMARY

The present disclosure describes a foot-operated apparatus for lifting and lowering a toilet seat that, is simple to use, easily and inexpensive to manufacture and easily installed on an existing commode. The apparatus is affordable and may be retro-fitted to most existing toilets in private homes and public facilities where toilets exist. A base support is adapted to attach to an existing tile, wood, cement or concrete flooring surface using a loop and hook fastener with an adhesive material on the opposite sides of loop and hook piece allowing the base to be easily installed and easily removed for ease of cleaning the unit and the area around the toilet. The design the base is of the correct mass and size to allow the pressure exerted upon the lever and foot pedal to maintain long term repetitive actuation of said lever with out concern of failure.

A lever foot pedal mounted in the base may be a single unit made of extruded and molded poly carbonate material for durability and corrosion resistance. A push rod pivotally connected to the foot pedal and pivotally connected to the toilet seat lifts and lowers the seat upon foot actuation and release, respectively.

The disclosure contemplates lots with the disassembled parts of the apparatus and written instructions for assembly. Optional parts may include but not be limited to a cushion disposed in the base to prevent the toilet seat from slamming down; a decorative cabinet to house the apparatus, appliques on the foot pedal to enhance grip and reduce slippage; and even a sleeve for the foot pedal to provide comfort for bare foot users.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a more complete, understanding of the present invention, and the advantages thereof, reference is now made to the following descriptions taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1A is a front view schematic drawing of a commode connected to a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure in the actuated position with the commode seat up.

FIG. 1B is a side view schematic drawing of the commode and apparatus of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 2A is a front view schematic drawing of a commode connected to a specific exemplary embodiment an apparatus of the present disclosure in the stand-by position with the commode seat down.

FIG. 2B is a side view schematic drawing of the commode and apparatus of FIG. 2A.

FIG. 3 is a side view cut away schematic drawing of a detail of FIG. 2B.

FIG. 4 is a side view schematic drawing of a base of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure.

FIG. 5 is a side view schematic drawing of a leaf spring of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure.

FIG. 6A is side view schematic drawing of a lever axle of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure.

FIG. 6B is side view schematic drawing of a lever axle of a specific exemplary alternative embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure.

FIG. 6c is side view schematic drawing of a lever axle of another specific exemplary alternative embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure.

FIG. 7 is a side view schematic drawing of a foot lever pedal of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure.

FIG. 8 is an exploded side view of a specific exemplary embodiment of a push rod assembly of the present disclosure.

FIG. 9A is a top view schematic drawing of toilet lid fastening attachment of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure.

FIG. 9B is a side view schematic drawing of the fastening attachment of FIG. 9A.

FIG. 9C is a side view schematic drawing of an alternative specific embodiment of the fastening attachment of FIG. 9A.

FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view diagrammatic illustration of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

For convenient reference a list of elements and corresponding reference numbers is provided.

REFERENCE NUMBER LIST

Commode 110

Commode Bowl 112

Commode Rim 114

Commode Tank 116

Commode Seat 120

Base 130

Rails 210, 212

Rails bores 138

Pedal 134

Pedal Splayed Portion 512

Pedal Axle Bore 215

Pedal Push Rod Bore 518

Pedal Proximate End 510

Pedal Distal End 142

Pedal Push Rod Bore 518

Leaf Spring 140

Screws 310, 320

Axle 136

Push Rod Assembly 150

Lower Rod 152

Lower Rod Threads 155

Lower Rod Flattened Area 820

Lower Rod Bore 810

Lower Rod Lower End 154

Pedal/Push Rod Connector—805

Pedal/Push Rod Connector Bolt—830

Pedal/Push Rod Connector Threads—840

Pedal/Push Rod Connector Nut—850

Turn Buckle—159

Push Rod Upper Rod—156

Push Rod Upper Rod Bore 640

Push Rod Upper Rod Threads—158

Push Rod/Seat Attachment Connector 650

Seat Attachment—710

Seat Attachment Bore 720

Seat Attachment Flanges 732, 734

Pedal/Push Rod Angle Actuated—a

Pedal/Push Rod Angle Standby—a′

Seat/Push Rod Angle Actuated—b

Seat Push Rod Angle Standby—b′

Referring now to FIG. 1A of the drawings, FIG. 1A is a front view schematic drawing of a commode connected to a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure in the actuated position with the commode seat up. Commode 110 has bowl 112 with rim 114 and tank 116 in fluid communication with bowl 112. Seat 120 is typically hingedly attached to bowl 112 so that seat 120 rests on rim 114 when seat 120 is no tin a lifted position.

An apparatus of the present disclosure may be positioned along side commode 110. Base 130 is slotted 132 to accommodate foot pedal lever actuator 134. A lever fulcrum may be formed by axle 136 disposed across slot 132 through rail bore 138. Axle 136 extends through bore 215 of foot pedal 134 at approximately the mid point of pedal 134 so that pedal 134 rotationally pivots around axle 136. Push rod 150 attached to pedal 134 pushed seat up 120 with attachment 710 connected to push rod 150 by connector 650.

In a preferred embodiment, base 130 is secured to the floor next to commode 110, or on a base or flange (not shown) extending from the bottom of commode 110, to prevent base 130 from slipping when force is applied to foot pedal 134. For example, base 130 may be secured to the floor with a mount such as a hook an loop attachment such as Velcro having an adhesive surface on each of the hook and loop pieces so that the attachment pieces can be adhered to the bottom of the base and to the floor or other suitable surface without the use of a tool.

FIG. 1B is a side Anew schematic drawing of the commode and apparatus of FIG. 1A. Pivoting connections, between push rod assembly 150 and pedal 134 and commode seat 120 may been seen by comparing oblique angles a and b formed at the junction of push rod 150 and pedal 134 and the junction of push rod 150 and seat 120, respectively, to the angles of these respective junctions shown in FIG. 2B, below, of a non-actuated apparatus of the present disclosure. The junctions angles a and b dynamically change during operation of the apparatus to both lift seat 120 and to lower seat 120. The application of actuating force on foot pedal 134, i.e. stepping on it, impels downward the front or proximate portion 510 of pedal 134, compressing leaf spring 140, as the rear or distal portion 142 is impelled upward, engaging push rod 150 which lifts seat 120.

Leaf spring 140 may be secured between the rails 210 and 212 of slot 132 toward the front or proximate side of base 130 in relation to axel 136 so that leaf spring 140 becomes compressed when foot pedal 134 is actuated in the down position (to lift seat 120). Upon release of the actuating force from pedal 134, leaf spring 140 returns to its equilibrium, transmitting upward force to pedal 134.

The rear or distal end 142 of foot pedal 134 may be pivotally connected to push rod 150, which in turn may be pivotally connected to seat 120.

FIG. 2A is a front view schematic drawing of a commode connected to a specific exemplary embodiment an apparatus of the present disclosure in the stand-by position with the commode seat down. Release of the actuating force described above returns the apparatus to its resting position. Upon release of the actuating force seat 120 descends to a resting position on commode rim 114 and leaf spring 140 rebounds to its equilibrium state.

FIG. 2B is a side view schematic drawing of the commode and apparatus of FIG. 2A. Angles a′ at the junction of push rod 150 and pedal 134 is approximately acute, and angle b′ between push rod 150 and seat 120 is now approximately a right angle, when the apparatus is in a stand-by position. The nature of these angles and their precise measurements may be a matter of design choice and are describe here merely to illustrate the pivoting nature of the connections and dynamic changes that may occur in the connection during operation of the apparatus. An alternative embodiment may provide a cushion (not shown) located toward the distal end of base 130 or pedal 134 to further ensure against slamming of seat 120 when the actuating force is released from pedal 134.

FIG. 3 is a side view cut away schematic drawing of a detail of FIG. 2B. Leaf spring 140 maybe proximately mounted to base 130. Bore 215 in lever pedal 134 may house axle 136 to provide a pivoting mounting of pedal 134 in base 130.

FIG. 4 is a side view schematic drawing of a base of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure. Base 130 may include side, rails 210, 212 forming a slot slightly wider than the lever foot pedal 134 by approximately 0.125 inch. A 0.25 inch bore 215 through both rails 210, 212 may be positioned at a height off the floor sufficient to provide a suitable lever fulcrum. Hole or bore 215 supports focal axle 136 which forms a lever focus for foot pedal 134. Base 130 may be fabricated from corrosive-resistant material such as extruded and molded polycarbonate for strength, durability and ease of maintenance.

Base 130 may be secured from slipping by fastening it to a suitable surface nearby to the commode, such as the floor or the base of the commode. Velcro or other loop and hook type fastener may be a suitable fastener, for example, but other modes of securing base 130 such as screws, nails, glue or other adhesive such as a cured adhesive like epoxy, snaps and so forth are contemplated by the present disclosure. Another way to keep base 130 from slipping may be to supply additional weight to base 130 with, for example, sand, ball bearings, or water supplied into a reservoir (not shown) in base 130, or by attaching some other weight such as a heavy metal to base 130.

The means of securing base 130 may be selected depending on the nature of the surface to which it will be secured. Many toilets have tile or stone floors that may be problematic for the use of nails or screws but which may be well suited for adhesive or Velcro-type fastening.

FIG. 5 is a side view schematic drawing of a leaf spring of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure. Although the leaf spring may be preferred, a standard coil spring, memory foam or other shape-memory material or structure, or pneumatic or hydraulic force may be employed. The functions to be achieved by this element are three-fold: (1) resist the actuating force of stepping on the foot pedal; (2) provide a force to return the foot pedal to the starting (up) position; and (3) to at least partially cushion seat 120 so that it does not slam down on the rim of the commode. Accordingly, a spring, memory foam, pneumatic force and so forth may be employed in the present apparatus.

Leaf spring 140 may be attached to base 130 (FIGS. 1 & 2) with self tapping screws 310, 320, for example, and positioned within rails 210, 212 of base 130 and acts as a resistance to lever foot pedal 134. Alternatively, spring 140 may be attached to base 130 with an adhesive, Velcro or other suitable means. Spring 140 returns toilet seat 120 to the down position when the pressure is released off of the lever foot pedal (FIG. 5) to assure seat 120 is in a down and set in position for the next user of the toilet.

FIG. 6A is side view schematic drawing of a lever axle of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure, in a specific embodiment of an axle 136 assembly of the present disclosure, a 0.18 inch diameter threaded hex bolt 410 and nut 420 at 16 UNC with bore 430 to insert back cotter pin 440. The arrangement of such a specific embodiment allows removal of axle 136 while nut 420 is retained from backing off the bolt 410 threads.

FIG. 6B is side view schematic drawing of a lever axle of a specific exemplary alternative embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure. The specific embodiment of FIG. 6B provides axle 620 consisting of a 0.325 inch diameter dual split end axle pin split into dual end 610, 612 at one end and dual end 614, 616 at the other end, which retains axle 136 in base 130. Specific embodiments may provide an axle assembly of the present apparatus fabricated from corrosion-resistant material such as plastic or polycarbonate.

FIG. 6c is side view schematic drawing of a lever axle of another specific exemplary alternative embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure. Nut 640 retains bolt 622 in base 130 through engagement with threads 630.

FIG. 7 is a side view schematic drawing of a foot lever pedal of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure. Pedal 134 fits in base 130 between rails 210, 212 so that pedal 134 can vertically pivot therein. Proximate end 510 of pedal 134 has a splayed portion 512 to facilitate operation by foot. Splayed portion 512 may optionally provide a slip-resistant surface by virtue of textures, appliques and the like. Bore 215 located at or near the longitudinal center of pedal 134 may accommodate therethrough lever axle 136. Distal end 142 of pedal 134 may be adapted to at least partially pivotally connect to push rod or push rod assembly 150.

A specific exemplary embodiment of such an adaptation may provide for example a slotted hole 518 sized to received both a push rod member and a connector such as a cylindrical axle/washer or screw/nut arrangement, or other suitable connection means, to connect push rod 150 to distal end 142 of pedal 134. Push rod 150 may also provide a slotted hole 518 to receive the connector. A slotted hole allows the entire pedal/push rod assembly to adjust to the dynamic angle changes that occur at the connection point between pedal 134 and push rod 150 during actuation and release of the seat-lifting apparatus.

An alternative embodiment provides a distal end 142 of pedal 134 with a connection bore sized to accommodate a flared dual split axle pin connecting pedal 134 to push rod 150.

Adhesive appliques such as sandpaper or decorative forms may provide a slip-resistant surface on pedal end 512. A decorative or soft sleeve, such as sheep skin, carpet upholstery and so forth that can be slipped over the foot pedal splayed portion 512 may also be provided to provide tactile comfort to barefoot users.

FIG. 8 is an exploded side view of a specific exemplary embodiment of a push rod assembly of the present disclosure. Push rod 150 may consist of an assembly of parts. A specific exemplary embodiment of such a assembly may be formed from a first or bottom rod 152 connected to foot pedal 134 at a bottom end 154 and having a threaded top end 155; a second or top rod 156 connected to seat 120 at a top end 157 and having a threaded bottom end 158; and a turn buckle 159 threadedly connecting threaded second end 155 of first rod 152 and threaded second end 158 of second rod 156. Thus the length of push rod 150 may be adjusted by turning turn buckle 159 so that push rod 150 may be adapted to commodes of different heights. The term “push rod” and its reference number 150 may refer interchangeably herein to a push rod assembly or to a unitary rod of an alternative embodiment.

Bottom push rod 152 may be 0.25 inches in diameter and preferably fabricated from corrosion resistant material. Lower end 154 of bottom rod 152 may have a relatively flattened area 820 to fit vertically within slot 518 of foot pedal 134 with, bore 810 to receive a cylindrical connector 805 transversely perpendicular to the vertical installation of push rod 150, as discussed above. Connector 805 inserts through the slotted hole 518 in the end of the foot lever pedal 134 and extends through bore 810 of bottom rod 152. Cylindrical connector 830 may have head 830 and threads 840 to retain nut 850, which keeps bottom push rod 152 and connector 805 from inadvertently disconnecting from foot lever pedal 134 but allowing removal for cleaning.

An alternative embodiment of bottom rod 152 provides a 0.5 inch bore to receive a connector, which in this embodiment may consist of a flared dual split axle pin cylindrical transverse connector 650 connected to pedal 134.

Top end 155 of bottom push rod 152 may be 16 UNC male threaded for connecting to turn buckle 159 having sufficient thread length to allow for appropriate adjustments for the differing heights of the toilets now manufactured and installed through out public and private facilities.

Top push rod 156 may be approximately 0.25 inches in diameter fabricated from corrosion resistant material and provides bore 640 to receive cylindrical transverse connector 650. The connector 650 may be rotatably disposed with receptacle 720 of toilet seat fastening attachment 710 (See FIG. 9). Cylindrical connector 650 may thereby rotate within receptacle 720 to accommodate the changing connection angle as seat 120 is pivotally raised and lowered by a user.

The lower end of top push rod 156 may be 16 UNC male threaded for connecting to turn buckle 159 and with adequate thread length to allow for appropriate adjustments for the differing heights of the toilets now manufactured and installed through out public and private facilities worldwide.

Turn buckle 159 may be a 0.25 inch female 16 UNC threaded connector with opposite threads on each end for adjusting push rods 152, 156 for the differing heights of the toilets now manufactured and installed through out the public and private facilities. The turn buckle is fabricated from corrosion resistant material and is sized for durability and strength.

FIG. 9A is a top view schematic drawing of toilet lid fastening attachment of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure. FIG. 9B is a side view schematic drawing of the fastening attachment of FIG. 9A. FIG. 9C is a side view schematic drawing of an alternative specific embodiment of the fastening attachment of FIG. 9A.

Fastener or connector 710 may provide tubular receptacle 720 to receive a cylindrical connector 650 to connect upper rod 156 of push rod 150 to seat 120. Connector 650 may be, for example, a dual split end axle pin extending from push rod 150. Flanges 732, 734 extend from two sides of receptacle 720 to facilitate adherence of fastener 710 to seat 120. Lid fastener 710 may be fabricated as a unitary piece from corrosion resistant and flexible material. Flexibility is preferred so that receptacle 720 may twist in response to forces from push rod 150 and seat 120 as the angle of connection dynamically changes when seat 120 is raised and lowered by operation of the present apparatus. Flanges 732, 734 may extend for a length sufficient to tolerate such twisting angular forces. Adhesive material on flanges 732, 734 may secure the flanges to the underside of the toilet seat 120.

FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view diagrammatic illustration of a specific exemplary embodiment of an apparatus of the present disclosure. Base 130 houses pedal 134 between rails 210, 212. Axle 136 disposed through bores 138 of rails 210, 212 and bore 215 provides a rotational pivot point for pedal 134. Leaf spring 140 may be secured between rails 210, 212 with screws 310, 320 to provide upward force to pedal 134 so that pedal 134 automatically returns to its standby position after use.

Distal bore 518 of pedal 134 retains the lower push rod assembly 805. Lower push rod assembly 805 may include bolt 830, nut 850 and threads 840 to retain nut 850 in relatively loose engagement with pedal 134 (via bore 518) so that a certain amount of play is allowed in the connection to accommodate the dynamically changing angles a, b, a′ and b′ during operation of the apparatus. Turn buckle 159 threadedly and adjustably attaches to threads 840 of assembly 805 and to upper rod 156. Connector 650 attaches to rod 156 through bore 640 and to seat attachment 710 through bore 720.

Continuing with FIG. 10, base 130 may be attached to the floor (not shown) or other suitable location near the commode with hook and loop type connectors having hook strips 940 adhered to the floor, for example, and loop strips 950 adhered to the bottom of base 130.

An apparatus of the present disclosure may optionally include a decorative cabinet or housing to house the workings of the apparatus such as the base and axle 136 mounting, and to provide a means by which the apparatus may be installed so as a to go with a given wash room decor.

In addition to the foregoing assembled or disassembled apparatus, the present disclosure contemplates that the apparatus may be provided disassembled in a kit for assembly in the home or shop. Accordingly, the apparatus may be assembled from its constituent parts with out the use of tools, or with commonly available tools such as a screw driver (slot or phillips), alien wrench and the like.

A kit of the present disclosure may include, for example, base 130, foot pedal lever 134, a lever fulcrum axle 136 including a washer, foot pedal 134, push rod assembly 150, connector 650 and fastener 710. Additionally, a kit of the present disclosure may include various pieces of hook and loop fabric having adhesive on one side to attach the fastener to the underside of the toilet seat and to attach the base to the floor or to the base of the commode. A kit of the present disclosure may also include a set of instructions that explains how to assemble the apparatus either printed on paper that accompanies the kit or a url to instructions on a web site.

A kit may also include a cabinet to decoratively house the apparatus, and may also include adhesive appliques such as sandpaper or decorative forms to provide a slip-resistant surface on the pedal. A decorative or soft sleeve, such as sheep skin, carpet, upholstery and so forth, for the foot, pedal may also be included that can be slipped over the foot pedal to provide tactile comfort to barefoot users.

Many modifications and other embodiments of the invention will come to mind to one skilled in the art to which this invention pertains having the benefit of the teachings presented in the foregoing descriptions and the associated drawings. Therefore, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the specific embodiments disclosed and that modifications and other embodiments are intended to be included within the scope of the appended claims. Although specific terms are employed herein, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation.

Claims

1. An apparatus for selectively lifting and lowering a toilet seat, the apparatus comprising:

a. a fulcrum;
b. a foot pedal lever pivotally connected to the fulcrum and having a proximate end foot pedal portion and a distal end actuating portion;
c. a spring positioned to compress when the foot pedal is actuated and to decompress when the foot pedal is released from actuation;
d. a push rod pivotally connected to the-actuating portion of the foot pedal lever at a first end and a second end pivotally connected to the toilet seat, and
e. a fastener attached to the push rod and attached to the toilet seat whereby the toilet seat lifts upon actuation of the foot pedal lever and the toilet seat lowers without slamming upon release of the foot pedal lever.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the push rod comprises a first rod pivotally connected to the actuation portion of the foot pedal at a first end and having a threaded second end; a second rod pivotally connected to the toilet seat at a first end and having a threaded second end; and a turn buckle adjustably connecting the threaded end of the first rod and the threaded end of the second rod, so that the length of the push rod can be adjusted by turning the turn buckle.

3. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the spring comprises a foil leaf spring.

4. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a base and an axel wherein the fulcrum comprises the axel suspended on the base, the axel being disposed through the foot pedal lever such that upon actuation or upon release from actuation the foot pedal pivots about the axel.

5. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein the base further comprises one or more mounts to secure the base in proximity to the toilet seat to keep the base from slipping upon actuation of the foot pedal.

6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein at least one of the mounts comprises a loop and hook type mount to secure the base.

7. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein at least one of the mounts comprises one or more holes for receiving a screw.

8. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a cabinet to house the apparatus, the cabinet having a front opening through which extends the foot pedal and a top opening through which extends the push rod.

9. The apparatus of claim 8, wherein the cabinet may be selectively removed or opened to facilitate cleaning and maintenance.

10. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein one or more components of the apparatus comprises a corrosion-resistant material.

11. The apparatus, of claim 10, wherein the corrosion-resistant material comprises a polycarbonate.

12. A kit for assembling an apparatus for selectively lifting and lowering a toilet seat, the kit comprising:

a. a fulcrum;
b. a foot pedal lever pivotally eonnectable to the fulcrum and having a proximate end foot pedal portion and a distal end actuating portion;
c. a spring positioned to compress when the foot pedal is actuated and to decompress when the foot pedal is released from actuation; and
d. a push rod pivotally eonnectable to the actuating portion of the foot pedal lever at a first end and a second end pivotally eonnectable to the toilet seat,
e. a fastener attachable to the push rod and attachable to the toilet seat wherein the apparatus may be assemble and connected to a toilet seat such that the toilet seat lifts upon actuation of the foot pedal lever and the toilet seat lowers without slamming upon release of the foot pedal lever; and
f. at least one set of instructions that explains how to assemble the apparatus.

13. The kit of claim 13, further comprising on or more mounts to secure the fulcrum in a selected location.

14. The kit of claim 13, wherein the fulcrum comprises an axel suspended on a base, such that the axel may be disposed transversely through the foot pedal lever.

15. The kit of claim 13, wherein the push rod further comprises

a first rod having a slotted a first end for receiving an axial connector to pivotally connect the first end to the actuation portion of the foot pedal and having a threaded second end;
a second rod having a slotted first end for receiving an axial connector to pivotally connect the first end to the toilet seat and having a threaded second end; and
a turn buckle for adjustably connecting the threaded end of the first rod and the threaded end of the second rod, so that the length of the push rod can be adjusted by turning the turn buckle; the kit further comprising one or more axial connectors.

16. A toilet comprising:

a. a commode having a pivotally liftable and lower-able seat;
b. a fulcrum in proximity to the commode;
c. a foot pedal lever pivotally connected to the fulcrum and having a proximate end foot pedal portion and a distal end actuating portion;
d. a spring positioned to compress when the foot pedal is actuated and to decompress when the foot pedal is released from actuation; and
e. a push rod pivotally connected to the actuating portion of the foot pedal lever at a first end and a second end pivotally connected to the toilet seat,
f. a fastener attached to the push rod and attached to the toilet seat whereby the toilet seat lifts upon actuation of the foot pedal lever and the toilet seat lowers without slamming upon release of the foot pedal lever.

Patent History

Publication number: 20090100581
Type: Application
Filed: Oct 19, 2007
Publication Date: Apr 23, 2009
Inventor: Vance Mixon (Round Rock, TX)
Application Number: 11/875,447

Classifications

Current U.S. Class: Lever Operated Opener (4/246.3); Lid (4/242.1); Bowl (4/420)
International Classification: A47K 13/10 (20060101); A47K 13/00 (20060101); E03D 11/02 (20060101);