Set of components used to fabricate enclosed and elevated roadways that are intended for use by bicycles, other small vehicles and pedestrians; and a process, utilizing said components, for planning and designing such a roadway

This invention discloses a set of components that have been designed and engineered and have functionalities, dimensions and structural properties specifically intended to enable selected combinations of the components to be assembled into modular sections of an enclosed and elevated roadway suitable for bicycles, other small vehicles and pedestrian walkways. Such modular sections can, in turn, be joined together and interconnected so as to form a network of roadways that include main thoroughfares and branches and other desired functions such as rest stops and parking facilities. Furthermore, the disclosed set of components enables a process to plan, design, engineer and configure networks of enclosed and elevated roadways to serve a specific municipality, campus, military base or any other geographical region.

Skip to: Description  ·  Claims  · Patent History  ·  Patent History

Description

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not Applicable

SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND

1. Field of Invention

This invention relates to a set of components used to fabricate enclosed and elevated roadways that are intended for use by bicycles, other small vehicles and pedestrians.

2. Prior Art

Although bicycles number over one billion worldwide and provide the principal means of transportation in some regions, their use, as well as the use of other small vehicles such as motorized scooters and other means of personal transportation, is severely restricted by several well-known deterrents, these are:

    • Unpleasant weather conditions (rain, snow, wind, sun, heat and cold).
    • The dangerous and unpleasant interference of motor vehicle traffic on roadways.
    • A general presumption that automobiles, rather than bicycles or other small vehicles, have priority on roadways and the implication that bicyclists are second-class citizens as compared to motor vehicle drivers.
    • A need to compete with pedestrians for riding space on many pathways and the possibility of collisions.
    • The relative slow speed of travel of a bicycle or other small vehicle as compared to motor vehicles such as automobiles.
    • A lack of suitable pathways along the desired routes or leading to the desired destinations.
    • The need to carry packages, children or other items which is cumbersome on a bicycle or other small vehicle.
    • Hills, which require extra physical exertion.
    • The stigma of sweating and messing-up one's clothes while riding.
    • The fear of breakdowns, flat tires and mechanical problems.
    • The fear of one's bicycle or other vehicle being stolen.
    • A lack of secure bicycle parking and personal item storage facilities.
    • The expense of purchasing a bicycle or other small vehicle.
    • The possible need to transport one's bicycle or other small vehicle from home or other starting point to a roadway suitable for riding.
    • Local regulations restricting the use of certain types of small vehicles, such as ®Segways or motorized scooters. This is often because of interference with pedestrians on existing sidewalks and other roadways.

Walking is also curtailed because of somewhat similar deterrents, such as:

    • Unpleasant weather conditions (rain, snow, wind, sun, heat and cold).
    • The dangerous and unpleasant interference of motor vehicle traffic on roadways.
    • A need to compete with bicycles and other small vehicles and people rollerblading, skating or using scooters on walkways and the possibility of a collision.
    • A lack of walkways along the desired routes or leading to the desired destinations.
    • The need to carry packages, children or other items.
    • The possible need to travel from home or other starting point to a pathway suitable for walking.

Furthermore, there are deterrents for a governmental agency or a private organization to construct and operate facilities that would reduce or eliminate the abovementioned factors should they wish to do so. These include:

    • The time, effort and costs associated with planning, designing and implementing such facilities.
    • The high cost of acquiring rights-of-way.
    • The high cost of construction.
    • The detrimental effects on ongoing activities, especially during the construction phases.
    • The potential negative effects on the environment and the aesthetics of neighborhoods and areas nearby.
    • The long time period for planning, acquiring land and construction.
    • The burdens of implementing and enforcing usages rules and regulations.
    • The possible crime and security concerns.

There are, however, significant benefits to be gained by individuals and societies, especially the industrialized nations, if many more people would ride bicycles and other small vehicles as well as doing more walking on a regular basis. These benefits are well-known and include:

    • Nations want to reduce their dependence on fossil fuels, especially imported oil. Bicycles and other human-powered vehicles and walking do not require fuel; and, other small personal motorized vehicles use much smaller quantities of fuel than, for example, automobiles.
    • Societies want to reduce global warming and general air pollution. Burning fossil fuels is a major contributor to these conditions.
    • Societies want to reduce obesity in general and especially obesity among children and the long-range disease and suffering it causes. Medical practitioners generally agree that regular aerobic exercise should be part of the solution. Regular bicycle riding and walking will aid in this effort.
    • Many nations are confronted with rising health care costs. A significant percentage of health care costs are related to obesity, lack of regular aerobic exercise and a scarcity of popular, accessible, stress relieving daily physical activity. Again, increases in bicycle riding, use of other small personal vehicles and walking will contribute to reducing these costs.
    • The high cost of traffic congestion—wasted time, stress and frustration, wasted fuel, vehicle wear and tear, public highway repair and construction costs. Bicycle riding, using other small personal vehicles as well as more walking by commuters will contribute to a reduction in traffic congestion.
    • Societies have always funded recreational facilities and attempted to provide readily accessible, comfortable and pleasant all-weather opportunities for daily exercise suitable for children, adults and senior citizens. Suitable facilities for providing these benefits are costly and good design concepts are limited.
    • Many urban areas want to reduce the need for additional parking in or near commercial centers. Shifting the use of personal automobiles to regular bicycle riding, use of other small personal vehicles and doing more walking will contribute to a reduction in the number of parking spaces required.
    • Societies have always attempted to provide mass transit systems as low cost alternatives to private motor vehicles as a means of transportation. One embodiment of the disclosed invention will provide such a low cost alternative.
    • Urban centers have a need for alternative emergency transportation systems in the event of widespread power outages, natural disasters, evacuations or terrorist attacks. The disclosed roadway system can provide such an alternative emergency transportation system.

Presently, many municipalities and other governmental bodies provide good sidewalks and walking paths and give consideration to and encourage the use of bicycles, other small personal vehicles and walking as a mode of transportation; that is, to use these as a means of transportation in addition to their use as a purely recreational activity. In particular, there are many bike trails, biking lanes on roadways and signage encouraging motorists to ‘share the road.’

These efforts, however, are typically not provided in sufficient numbers or with sufficient protection from the weather or dangerous and annoying vehicular traffic nor do they address the other deterrents to bicycle riding and walking as mentioned above. This has been due, in part, to the expense of acquiring rights-of-way for construction of bike-paths, to the costs of construction and maintenance, the deeply ingrained habit and tradition of using automobiles and the fact that only a small percentage of many populations actually ride bicycles or other small vehicles.

It is apparent that for societies to attain the abovementioned benefits attributed to increasing the number of people bicycling, using other small vehicles and walking, these must become a regular and accepted means of transportation for a significant percentage of the population. This will occur only when roadways or pathways that alleviate some or all of the abovementioned deterrents are provided in sufficient quantities so as to make walking, bicycling and the use of other small vehicles a practical and pleasant alternative to driving an automobile.

The disclosed invention, one embodiment of which results in an enclosed and elevated roadway and transportation network suitable for walking, bicycles and other small vehicles, provides an efficient and cost effective way to construct facilities that will enable walking, bicycling and the use of other small vehicles to become pleasant, cost saving and socially responsible alternatives to driving an automobile on a daily basis.

Prior art relating to this invention is considered from four perspectives:

    • 1. Known products and objects having similarities to the disclosed set of modular components that can be assembled into an enclosed and elevated roadway or walkway.
    • 2. As a transportation system, such as Personal Rapid Transit (PRT) systems and Automated People Mover (APM) technology, since one embodiment of this invention is a transportation system or network comprised of elevated, enclosed roadways which will provide a means for bicycles, other small vehicles and pedestrians to travel between locations by using these roadways.
    • 3. As a set of components that can be assembled into elevated, enclosed roadways having desired configurations by someone familiar with the set of available components and the nature of their functionality.
      • For the purpose of explanation and clarification of this concept, consider a conceptually similar set of components; this being the set of all available galvanized iron pipe and pipe fittings. A plumber, desiring to fulfill a particular task, can select and configure various component members of this set comprised of various sizes and lengths of pipe and matching pipe fittings, thereby selecting suitable components to meet the requirements of the task at hand.
      • One aspect of this invention is conceptually similar in that it is a set of components designed and engineered to provide a sufficient variety of member shapes, sizes and functions such that a selection of components can be assembled into a desired configuration for a section of an elevated, enclosed roadway.
    • 4. As a process for planning and designing an elevated, enclosed roadway system, since the disclosed components will have a profound impact of the methods and process one follows to plan, design, engineer, configure, assemble, construct, implement, maintain, operate and incorporate future upgrades into a network of elevated roadways for bicycles, other small vehicles and/or pedestrians intended to service a geographical region such as a municipality or university campus.

1. Prior Art as it Relates to Similar Objects:

Covered bridges built in the 19th century have several similarities to the disclosed enclosed and elevated roadway. Such bridges included a roadway surface, side walls, a roof and a truss in each of the two sidewalls; and, they were elevated in the sense that they were held at a desired elevation and orientation by footings on each side bank of a river.

Such bridges, however, were designed and constructed on an individual basis and were intended and suitable for a specific location only. Furthermore, they are not modular in nature and cannot be connected together in an end-to-end manner to form a covered roadway of a desired length. Other critical differences include: they cannot be pre-manufactured and transported to a desired location; they are not suitable to be erected on an arbitrary terrain; they cannot be erected so as to run along an existing street or other right-of-way; and, they cannot be combined so as to form a transportation network.

There are modular walkways, one of which is offered for sale by Wickcraft Company, Inc. of Madison, Wis. 53718, that have several similarities to the disclosed track components, these being components of the disclosed set of components and are elements of the enclosed and elevated roadway also disclosed. These walkways are offered in several widths and the walkway surface is made of standard lumber. They are supported at a desired height, albeit close to ground level, by a metal framework having adjustable legs and pads which rest on the ground. They are modular in nature and can be connected together to form a walkway of any desired length and include at least one angle component which allows the walkway to turn.

These walkways, however, are not intended to be nor could they be elevated sufficiently high so as to run along and above an existing street. Furthermore, there are no side walls offered to prevent users from falling off; nor is there a suitable means for attaching a sidewall.

Whereas the framework is adequate to strengthen and support the walkway surface, it is not suitable nor could it be made suitable to span a sufficiently long distance to allow the walkway to, as just one example, cross-over an existing roadway. In this invention, the straight track components are similar; however, these components are intended to be and are suitable for mating with and connecting to one or more track-enclosure components which contain truss elements that extend along each side edge of the track component. This combination provides critical properties and capabilities not available in the Wickcraft Company's walkways. These are:

    • 1. The trusses contribute sufficient strength to an assemblage combining the track component with one or more track-enclosure components so that it can span a distance greater than 40 feet while supporting its design loadings.
    • 2. Second, this assemblage provides side walls to enclose the roadway surface and prevent users from falling off the roadway.
    • 3. Third, this assemblage provides a roof covering the roadway and windows thereby completely enclosing the roadway and protecting it from the wind and rain.
    • 4. Fourth, this invention discloses a set of structural supports intended to be and suitable for mating with and attaching to each of the enclosed roadway assemblages. These structural supports are designed to support the enclosed roadway at suitable heights and be spaced at suitable distances apart so as to enable the elevated roadway to run above or alongside of an existing street or train track.
    • 5. Furthermore, there are a variety of structural support shapes and sizes and they can be configured with a variety of support bases so a combination is available to suite any existing terrain.
    • 6. The Wickcraft Company's walkways offer only straight and angled modules. However, in order to fabricate a network of enclosed and elevated roadways a multitude of shapes, sizes and functionalities are required as is provided with the disclosed invention.

There are also numerous elevated walkways that are well known; some of these are fabricated in a modular fashion and are enclosed. Such walkways are commonly seen functioning as a bridge to connect buildings together; and, in large public facilities such as airports, functioning as a walkway between terminals.

Whereas components selected from the disclosed set of modular components could be assembled into a walkway similar to such well know enclosed and elevated walkways, the reverse is not true. That is to say, these modular walkway components could not be used to assemble an enclosed and elevated roadway suitable for bicycles, other small vehicles and pedestrians. The reasons for this include:

    • 1. All know existing enclosed and elevated modular walkways and components making up such walkways have limited capabilities and flexibility. Typically, they anticipate and are suitable only for walkways that are relatively short; less than one mile, for example. And, they include only components suitable for walkways that are straight or straight with angled turns. These limitations would preclude their use as an extended roadway system such as disclosed in this invention. Just one of many examples is that an extended roadway would require a multitude of horizontal turning elements offering alternative turn radii as well as included turning angles as well as a variety of walkway or roadway widths.
    • 2. Although bicycles and other small vehicles could utilize such walkways, they are not intended for nor are they optimized for such use. By way of examples, some shortcomings are a lack of lane markings, the lack of merging lanes, passing lanes, emergency pull-off lanes and means to accommodate rest stops.
    • 3. The known modular, elevated and enclosed walkways are a predetermined width. Although they may be available in a selection of widths, each particular walkway has a fixed width. This would not be suitable for an extended roadway system as disclosed herein. For an extended roadway system the traffic-flow capacity would vary at different locations—just as and for the same reasons as a highway width varies. Furthermore, when the width changes there is the need for a transition modular section and roadway surface markings indicating the need to merge lanes.
    • 4. The writer knows of no modular enclosed and elevated walkway systems that include structural supports, a means to attach the walkway components to them nor a means for the walkway to be held at a desired elevation and orientation by them. The disclosed set of modular components, however, includes a multitude of structural support elements; these constitute a critical component of this invention. In addition, these structural supports are designed such that selected ones will be compatible with the terrain at each point along the roadway. Taken in the context of a roadway extending several miles or a network of such roadways serving a geographical region as is disclosed herein, this implies that there needs to be a variety of structural support shapes, sizes and footprints to accommodate the varying terrain and land uses at each point along the roadway.
    • 5. Another crucial objective of the disclosed enclosed and elevated roadway is that the structural supports have minimal interference with the preexisting uses and activities of the terrain over which it passes. Indeed, it is considered another crucial objective of this invention for the roadway to be suitable for routing above or alongside existing roadways, train tracks, foot paths, utility rights-of-way, rivers and other existing paths selected for the express purpose of minimizing right-of-way and land acquisition time and costs and having minimal interference with ongoing activities along the route. Accordingly, any single, specific support structure design would be unsuitable considering the wide range of conditions and situations likely to be encountered at various locations along a roadway extending for several miles. Furthermore, any structural support design composed of concrete columns or beams or one that requires a significant concrete footing to be poured and fitted with anchor bolts would be contrary to such supporting means, this being because of the disruption to the nearby area during construction, and would thus be inherently unsuitable in some instances.

In conclusion, one could say the common concept appearing in the above listed shortcomings of know modular elevated and enclosed walkway systems is that they do not have a sufficient variety of types of components, nor an adequate selection of shapes and sizes and functionalities of components so as to offer a practical or workable system with which to plan, configure and construct an enclosed and elevated roadway system.

Conversely, the disclosed set of components is a complete set. That is to say, someone familiar with this disclosed set and the range and variety of components available in it will be able to select components from the set:

    • 1. such that selected components can be assembled into a modular section of an enclosed and elevated roadway, and
    • 2. that these modular sections of roadway can be readily mated with and connected to other modular sections so as to form a contiguous enclosed, elevated roadway system of a desired shape and size and having desired functionalities at each point along the roadway, and
    • 3. to include structural support components that will enable the roadway to be supported at a desired elevation and orientation and that the support components will be compatible with the terrain, soil conditions, existing land use and existing activities at each point along the roadway, and
    • 4. to configure a roadway that is all or partially elevated above the existing terrain so as to minimize the impact on land, plant life, wildlife, water flow, roadways, structures and existing or planned use of the area beneath and nearby this roadway, and
    • 5. to maximize the likelihood that it can be constructed over, along or alongside of existing utility rights-of-way, existing roadways, trails, pathways, rivers, parks, train tracks, railways or other passageways so as to minimize land acquisition, legal, planning and acquisition negotiation costs and time, and
    • 6. to construct an elevated roadway suitable for and attractive to users as a recreational facility in addition to its function as a transportation system; that is to say, construct a roadway attractive to individuals and groups seeking exercise and alternative activities, especially during evenings, weekends and holidays.

2. Prior Art, as it Relates to a Transportation System:

The University of Washington's Faculty Website, Innovative Transportation Technologies page (http://faculty.washington.edu/jbs/itrans/techtable.htm), summarizes more than one hundred Personal Rapid Transit and Automated People Mover concepts being evaluated around the world. Several of these include a system of elevated, enclosed tubes through which small vehicles travel. Nearly all of these, however, require small, specially designed, motorized vehicles and sophisticated traffic control systems.

One of these, SKY BIKES AND BIKE TRAINS a GUIDED BICYCLE RAPID TRANSIT, by Peter A. Sharp (http://faculty/washington.edu/˜jbs/itrans/skybike.htm) proposes using streamlined, recumbent bicycles with electric motors. The bikes have an aerodynamic enclosure and are arranged into groups, or “Bike Trains”. These, then, travel on an elevated guideway to allow faster, more efficient travel and expend less rider energy. The disclosed “guideway”, however, is not enclosed nor does it offer protection from weather. Also, the bicycles are of special design and the guideway precludes the possibility of riders of conventional bicycles or other small vehicles or pedestrians from using the elevated guideway.

There are also four known designs for enclosed, elevated roadways suitable for traditional bicycles that have been disclosed. These are:

THE BICYCLE EXPRESSWAY SYSTEM—A VIABLE URBAN TRANSPORTATION SOLUTION by Joseph Adler, presented circa 1984. (http://www.efn.org/˜rick/bike/bike.expressway)

BTS's Transglide 2000™ bicycle transit system by Milnor H. Senior III in 1997. This system is disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,558,023 and 5,671,681.

THE VELO-CITY PROJECT by Chris Hardwicke was introduced circa 2004 (http://www.velocity.ca/MainFrameset.html) and presented as a network of elevated roadways to serve the city of Toronto, Canada.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,859,682; May 2, 1973; “Tubular Transportation Element” by Jan Sulkiewicz. This patent discloses a tubular transportation element comprising a tube having at least one wall of plastic in one continuous piece, at least one deck member for vehicular traffic. It also discloses the tube as being designed to span a distance while being supported at its ends.

The Transglide 2000™ and the Velo-City Project™ designs include pneumatic assistance for the bicycle rider by incorporating forced airflow in the direction of travel. Whereas the benefits of such airflow, including enabling the bicycle to travel faster and reducing the energy expended by the rider, cannot be disputed, the size and power requirements of the fans needed to sustain such airflow appears to render this concept impractical from an operating cost and engineering design perspective. Furthermore, these designs would be unsuitable for pedestrian use and would be detrimental to those wishing to use another type of small vehicle such as a motorized scooter or Segway®.

The Senior U.S. Pat. No. 5,558,023, “Enclosed transportation system for rider propelled vehicles with pneumatic propulsion assistance” discloses, for use in a transportation network including a bicycle pathway surface, a transportation structure for bicyclists established by a plurality of interconnectable modules comprising a cover and walls that are attached to (the) surface. The actual roadway or pathway surface, however, is not included. Nor are the structural supports, which are required to hold the roadway surface and the disclosed cover and walls at a desired elevation, included.

The Senior patent discloses, primarily, an elevated, enclosed pathway that embodies a method for aiding movement of a rider propelled vehicle by inducing airflow along the pathway.

ALL known disclosures of such transportation systems that include an enclosed, elevated roadway for bicycles or other small vehicles are merely conceptual designs. None have gained widespread public support and none have actually been constructed.

Furthermore, the disclosed designs have not been described in sufficient detail; neither to actually construct such a system nor to determine their practicality from an engineering perspective. Neither have the designs been subjected to technical analysis so as to ascertain the completeness of the design or the structural details nor have full-scale prototypes been constructed to demonstrate their feasibility.

The disclosed invention, however, is not presented as a ‘transportation system’, but as a set of components that can be assembled into an enclosed and elevated roadway network for bicycles, other small general use vehicles and/or pedestrians and methods and a process, utilizing these components to plan and design a transportation network.

And, the disclosed invention does not propose any induced airflow within the enclosed roadway to aid the user as is the case with the Senior patent.

3. Prior Art, as a Set of Components:

Within the construction industry there are numerous examples of sets of components that have been designed and engineered to enable the modular assembly of a desired system. For example, all available galvanized iron pipe and pipe fittings constitute such a set of components. A plumber, desiring to fulfill a particular task, can select and configure various sizes and lengths of pipe and matching pipe fittings, thereby creating a subset suitable to meet the requirements of the task at hand.

There are, in addition, numerous other construction sets. These include sets of components suitable for constructing walkways, bridges, buildings and various other types of structures as well as one to construct roadways for walking or bicycle riding, ref. 2002/0078652, Modular Structural Surface Assembly, describing a small, local surface that lies on the ground and is intended for bicycles to be able to have beach access or traverse soft ground.

Other conceptually similar sets of components include:

    • A set of copper tubing and copper fittings used for water supply systems.
    • A set of galvanized metal ductwork and fittings and accessory components used by HVAC contractors.
    • A set of electrical supplies, including wires, wire conduit, conduit fittings, boxes, switches and receptacles used by electricians for wiring homes.
    • A set of scaffolding components from which selected members can be used to construct scaffolding of a desired shape and size.

One characteristic of these well known and successful sets is that they are complete sets. An incomplete set would be of little or no practical use. To illustrate this concept, consider a set of dinnerware having only desert plates and soup bowls.

The above related analogy has relevance because the disclosed set of components is a complete set; it comprises a sufficient variety of member functionalities and a sufficient range of member physical properties so that there will be components that can be selected from this set suitable for assembly into a modular section of an enclosed and elevated roadway having a desired shape and size and provide desired functionality. To the contrary, sets of components available to construct walkways for example, are incomplete sets in this context. Should one attempt to use them to configure an enclosed and elevated roadway for bicycles the severe limitations on available components would preclude a successful result.

The disclosed invention includes a set of components that can be assembled in a conceptually similar fashion. However, the components of this invention have been designed, engineered and manufactured, often into sub-assemblies, and have functionalities, dimensions and structural properties specifically intended to enable selected combinations of the components to be assembled into elevated and enclosed roadway modular sections suitable for bicycles, other small vehicles and/or pedestrian walkways.

The U.S. Pat. No. 5,558,023, by Milnor H. Senior discloses, for use in a transportation network including a bicycle pathway surface, a transportation structure for bicyclists established by a plurality of interconnectable modules comprising a cover and walls that are attached to (the) surface.

Here, the surface, per se, is not claimed nor are any other components of a transportation network claimed except as pertains to fans and an induced airflow through the enclosed structure. Furthermore, there is no disclosure of methods or a process to design and construct such a transportation network.

The Senior patent does not disclose a set of components; it does not address the need for any of the many functions required for a transportation network that includes a bicycle pathway: these would include wider and narrower pathways or other means to allow increased traffic flow sections, transitions between wider and narrower sections, passing lanes, turning lanes, rest stops, emergency exits, inclines or descents which are necessary to change elevation of the pathway, horizontal turns, intersections and merging roadways.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,859,682, “Tubular Transportation Element”, discloses a tubular transportation element comprising a tube having at least one wall of plastic in one continuous piece, at least one deck member for vehicular traffic. It also discloses the tube as being designed to span a distance while being supported at its ends. Here, the tube is presented as a modular component that can be connected to other similar components to form an enclosed and elevated roadway.

However, said patent does not disclose a set of components, rather a single, straight section of roadway. This patent does not address the need for any of the many functions required for a transportation network including a bicycle pathway: these would include wider and narrower pathways or other means to allow increased traffic flow sections, transitions between wider and narrower sections, passing lanes, turning lanes, rest stops, emergency exits, inclines or descents which are necessary to change elevation of the pathway, horizontal turns, intersections and merging roadways.

4. Prior Art, as a Process for Planning and Designing a Transportation System.

Consider the methods and process typically followed today to plan, design, engineer, configure, assemble, construct, implement, operate, maintain and efficiently incorporate future upgrades into a transportation system. Specifically, consider a transportation system that would utilize enclosed, elevated roadways for bicycles, other small vehicles and/or pedestrians to serve a municipality, as an example.

Presently, this process of moving from the initial idea to a working system would involve many time consuming and costly steps and be subject to risks of oversights and unanticipated problems. The primary reason for this is that each such project is considered as a completely new and unique system. Accordingly, it requires designers, architects, engineers, manufacturers and construction teams to carry out their respective tasks to design and build something completely new. They would have to carry out research and development, experimentation and testing of each of many possible design concepts and components. Furthermore, if several different municipalities were to embark on such a project, the likelihood is that most would develop a different set of specifications and focus on different concepts resulting in different designs.

The disclosed invention, then, is a set of standardized components—already designed, already engineered, and already pre-fabricated. There are, as well, predetermined specifications and construction methods and a design and implementation process suitable for any geographical region. And, the set of available components is sufficiently large so as to allow a planner to pick and choose sizes and functionality for each section along the particular roadway he is considering.

That is to say, the process of moving from the initial idea to a working network of enclosed, elevated roadways interconnecting all sections of a municipality or a college campus would be similar to that followed by a plumber as he plans and fabricates the water supply and drain lines in a home—he selects components from a set of standardized components—already designed, already engineered, and already fabricated; in this example, the set of pipes and pipe fittings readily available to him.

The disclosed set of standardized components, construction methods and the implementation process have sufficient flexibility and an adequate number of options so as to provide a plurality of such governing bodies, each with different climates, different geographical terrains, different existing roadways and different sets of priorities to utilize the disclosed components and methods and process to implement such a roadway network that will meet their own, unique situations while enjoying a significant time and cost savings and with reduced risk of oversights or unforeseen problems. In addition, since all such roadways are selections from a standardized master-set of components, the interconnection of adjoining networks is greatly simplified. As an example, a university campus system can be easily interfaced with the neighboring city's system.

And, in addition, since all such transportation systems are implemented according to the standardized methods and use standard components, long term support including maintenance and system upgrades can be accomplished with minimal time and cost. This, in part due to the standardized modular components and the means of connecting them allows for simple removal and replacement with an alternative component.

To the best of this inventor's knowledge, there are no know sets of components designed to form an enclosed, elevated roadway network suitable for bicycles, other small vehicles and/or pedestrians. Accordingly, there are no disclosed methods or processes utilizing such a set of components to plan and design such a roadway network.

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES

It is an object of this invention to provide a set of pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured components that can be used to assemble and construct an enclosed and elevated roadway suitable for bicycles, other small vehicles and/or pedestrians.

More specifically, it is an object of this invention to design said components such that selected ones can be assembled into a modular section of such an enclosed and elevated roadway. And, that these modular sections of roadway can be readily mated with and connected to other modular sections so as to form a contiguous enclosed and elevated roadway system of a desired shape and size and having desired functionalities at each point along the roadway.

It is another objective to provide a complete set. That is to say, the set of components should have a sufficient variety of sizes, shapes and functionalities such there will always be suitable components available to be selected from the set, by someone familiar with the set, to assemble a contiguous roadway system having a desired shape and length; and, where said roadway system:

    • a. is suitable for and compatible with the neighborhood and geographical terrain at each said point along the roadway, and
    • b. is suitable for and compatible with the pre-existing and planned land use at each said point, and
    • c. is suitable for and compatible with the desired elevation and three-dimensional trajectory direction of the roadway at each said point, and
    • d. is suitable for and compatible with the desired traffic-flow capacity and roadway functionality at each said point.

It is another objective to include in said set structural support components that will enable the roadway to be supported at a desired elevation and orientation; and, that said support components will be compatible with, but not limited to, the terrain, soil conditions, existing land use and existing activities at each point along the roadway.

It is another objective to provide such a set of components to construct a roadway that is partially elevated above the existing terrain so as to minimize the impact on land, plant life, wildlife, water flow, roadways, structures and existing or planned use of the area beneath and nearby this roadway.

It is another objective to provide such a set of components to construct an elevated roadway suitable to be disposed over, along or alongside of existing utility rights-of-way, existing roadways, trails, pathways, rivers, parks, train tracks, railways or other passageways; one purpose for which being to minimize land acquisition costs as well as the associated legal, planning and negotiation time and costs.

It is another objective to provide such a set of components that are structurally designed and composed of materials such that a resulting roadway will be lightweight and low in cost. By minimizing weight of the roadway modules, the weight and material costs of the structural support components will be correspondingly minimized. Furthermore, by minimizing roadway weight the structural support footprints will tend to be minimized; this resulting in minimized environmental and aesthetic impact on the land and area beneath and nearby the roadway.

It is another objective to provide such a set of components that are structurally designed and composed of materials that are environmentally friendly.

It is another objective to ensure that said components include or can accommodate amenities to make the roadways pleasant and attractive to users. Amenities would include, but not be limited to, providing transparent sides so as to offer a panoramic views, good ceiling height, good width, good riding surface, adequate ventilation, a means to control temperature, good space lighting, decorative lighting, entertainment system and a communication system that allows members of a riding group to carry on conversations.

It is another objective to ensure that said components include a number of accessories and optional extra features so as to provide additional functionality, improved aesthetics, additional user conveniences, improved compatibility with nature, the environment and exterior motor vehicle activities beneath and near to the roadway. Some examples include, but are not limited to; cable conduits within the roadway enclosure suitable for housing electrical, telephone, video and other cables or wires; panels on the roof to capturing solar energy; misting and radiant heating units to cool or warm users; pneumatic transport tubes within the roadway enclosure capable of transporting packages; plant-grow lighting on the bottom of the roadway to promote plant growth underneath; mechanical devices to assist riders to climb inclines and entrance ramps; provisions to mount exterior motor vehicle traffic signage and traffic signals; provisions to mount exterior street lighting fixtures.

It is another objective to provide such a set of components that are modular and quickly and easily replaceable so as to facilitate long term maintenance operations. And, to provide a variety of interchangeable components having varied functionality so as to facilitate modifications and upgrades quickly and easily as future requirements may require. For example, should a branch roadway be required, an appropriate turning lane and branch-off section could be inserted; or, a passing lane or a rest stop or a new entrance or exit could be inserted by simply replacing several of the existing section components with alternative components at minimal cost or interference with existing operations.

It is another objective to provide an elevated roadway suitable for and attractive to users as a recreational facility in addition to its function as a transportation network. That is to say, construct a roadway attractive to individuals and groups seeking exercise and alternative activities, especially during evenings, weekends and holidays.

It is another objective to provide a network of such roadways so as to allow bicycles, other small vehicles and/or pedestrians to freely move about within a geographical region such as a municipality, campus, military base or any other government or private facility.

It is another objective to provide a plurality of interconnected networks such as a network within a military base interconnected with one or more nearby municipalities.

It is another objective to provide such a set of components that has sufficient flexibility and range of sizes and functions such that the unique roadway network design requirements for each of many different particular networks, which may be located in different and diverse geographical and political regions, can be accommodated by using appropriate components selected from said set.

It is another objective to provide a network of roadways that protects its users from unpleasant weather conditions such as rain, snow, wind, sun, heat and cold.

It is another objective to provide a network of roadways that separates and protects its users from motor vehicle traffic.

It is another objective to provide a network of roadways that separates and protects bicycle and other small vehicle traffic from interference with pedestrians and visa-versa.

It is another objective to provide a network of roadways that is expressly for bicyclists, users of other small vehicles and/or pedestrians such that said users experience a feeling of being the first and preferred class of citizen while they are within said network.

It is another objective to provide a network of roadways having two or more substantially parallel roadway surfaces each accommodating a particular class of user and each of which is optimized to serve that particular user class. This would include, but not be limited to, roadways for pedestrians walking or skating, roadways for motorized bicycles or scooters, roadways for commercial and/or highly skilled users and general use roadways suitable for children, older persons and normal skill-level bicycle riders.

It is another objective to provide a network of roadways that is suitable for bicycles and other small vehicles to include a basket, baggage racks or tow a small trailer for the purpose of carrying children and packages.

It is another objective to provide such a network that includes rest-stop areas whereby users can move out of traffic lanes and stop; service areas whereby users can move out of traffic lanes and obtain assistance in the event of mechanical breakdowns, flat tires or other problems and for use by law enforcement officers; transition areas allowing users to easily move from the traffic lanes of the roadway to alternative function areas to access to toilets, clothes changing, eating, bicycle repair and other facilities useful to users and to return to the roadway; bicycle and other small vehicle parking areas and lockers for storage of personal effects that can provide the desired level of security for the users to park or store personal belongings.

It is another objective to provide such a network that includes suitable facilities for bicycles and other small vehicles that are owned by the network operator or third parties and are made available to users of the network.

It is another objective to provide such a network of roadways that is suitable for and attractive to many citizens so as to encourage usage of said roadways, in lieu of driving an automobile, thereby reducing traffic congestion on existing motor-vehicle roadways.

It is another objective to encourage riding a bicycle or other human-powered vehicle on a regular basis for the purpose of getting aerobic exercise and enjoying the health benefits of such exercise.

It is another objective to provide such a network that offers a recreational facility suitable for use by people of all ages, during all hours and in all weather conditions.

It is another to provide an alternative, effective and realistic emergency transportation system within its community to allow citizens to vacate dangerous areas and allow emergency workers to move about the region where said system; does not depend on power from the electrical grid; does not have ‘drivers’ or ‘conductors’ and could be operated independently from other public transportation systems; may not be effected by strikes or work stoppages; is separate and independent from the existing roadway networks serving motor vehicles and rail systems so as not to be affected by normal traffic congestion or railway stoppage; is relatively immune to its own internal traffic congestion stopping its traffic flow since a bicycle rider can, and customarily does, pick up his bike and carry it over or around obstacles and breakdowns could be easily moved out of traffic lanes by a single person, with no ‘tow-truck’ needed.

With these and other objects in view, which will become apparent to one skilled in the art as the description proceeds, this invention resides in the novel set of components, methods and processes substantially as hereinafter described, and more particularly defined by the appended claims, it being understood that changes in the precise embodiment of the herein disclosed invention are meant to be included as they may come within the scope of the claims.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention discloses a master-set of components that have been designed and engineered and have functionalities, dimensions and structural properties specifically intended to enable selected combinations of the components to be assembled into modular sections of an enclosed and elevated roadway suitable for bicycles, other small vehicles and/or pedestrian walkways. Such roadway sections can, in turn, be joined together and interconnected so as to form a network of roadways that might include main thoroughfares and branches and other desired functions such as rest stops and parking facilities.

And a process, utilizing this master-set of components, to plan and design transportation networks comprised, in part, of enclosed and elevated roadways suitable for use by bicycles, other small vehicles and pedestrians.

And, where said roadways and transportation networks are also suitable for use as recreational facilities, particularly during evening hours and weekends.

And, where said roadways and transportation networks are also suitable for use as an emergency transportation system in the event of power outages, work stoppages, natural disasters or terrorist acts; any of which could disrupt existing transportation systems and traditional means of travel. This capability being because the disclosed roadway system is not dependent on external power sources; and it functions independently from existing municipal systems, traffic control systems and existing transportation systems.

The disclosed master-set of components is a complete set. It is designed and engineered in such a manner and includes a sufficient variety of member functionalities and a sufficient range of member physical properties so that there will be components that can be selected from this master-set suitable for assembly into a modular section of an enclosed and elevated roadway having a desired shape and size and provide desired functions. And, said modular section of roadway will be compatible with the climate and geographical terrain at its intended location along the roadway, the pre-existing and planned land use at this location, the desired traffic-flow capacity at this location, the desired three-dimensional direction of travel for the roadway at this location and the desired roadway functionalities at this location.

And, where said modular sections of roadway can be combined and mated together so as to form a roadway system of a desired length and size and provide the desired traffic-flow capacity and functionality at each point along its length.

Furthermore, the disclosed master-set of components enables methods and a process to plan, design, engineer, configure, assemble, construct, implement, operate, maintain and efficiently incorporate future upgrades for networks of enclosed, elevated roadways, each of which is particularly configured to serve a specific municipality, campus, military base or any other geographical region or combination of regions.

And, the disclosed methods and process allow these functions to be accomplished in a highly cost-effective manner and with minimal land acquisition time and expense and with minimal interference with existing land use and activities.

And in addition, the disclosed methods and process for planning, designing, engineering, configuring, assembling, constructing, implementing, operating, maintaining and efficiently incorporating future upgrades into such a network, by utilizing said master-set of components, results in significant time and cost savings and reduced risk of oversights or unforeseen problems.

In addition, by following the disclosed methods and process, long term support including repairs, maintenance and system upgrades can be accomplished with minimal time and cost.

DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 A modular element intended and suitable to serve as a segment of a modular roadway.

FIG. 2 Illustration showing, conceptually, how several members of the disclosed master-set of components might be selected and assembled together to configure a segment of a modular roadway.

FIG. 3 Two track components selected from a set of track components, where a portion of the roadway surfaces have been cut away to expose a structural framework. Also shown is a bolt that provides a means to connect the two components together.

FIG. 4 Six track components selected from the set of track components, where each of the track components has a predetermined size and shape, provides one or more functionalities indicated by the traffic lane indicium and is connected to at least one other track component so as to form a desired configuration. Some components are connected together in an end-to-end arrangement; others are connected together in a side-by-side arrangement. The arrows indicate the intended traffic direction within each traffic lane.

FIG. 5 A sampling of track components selected from the set of track components, but not all components included in said set are illustrated. This figure illustrates some of the common shapes and sizes of track components available to a designer of a roadway.

FIG. 6 A perspective of a barrier-wall component, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. Here part of a vertical barrier element has been cut away to expose a load bearing truss. As illustrated, the truss is enclosed by the substantially vertical barrier element.

FIG. 7 A perspective of a barrier-wall component, selected from the set of barrier-wall components, and a track component, selected from the set of track components and suitable for mating with said barrier-wall component, each being connected to each other. This figure illustrates that a barrier-wall component has a predetermined shape and size and is intended to mate with and attach to one or more suitably selected track components.

FIG. 8 A sampling of barrier-wall components selected from the set of barrier-wall components, but not all barrier-wall components included in this set are illustrated. Each of the barrier-wall components is shown in an intended disposition in relationship to a roadway surface with which it is suitable to be connected together. The illustrated components do not show an optional roof, windows or structural ribs; however, similarly shaped track-enclosure components including these elements are also included in said set.

FIG. 9 Three track-enclosure components connected together, respectively, with three track components, each in their intended dispositions with respect to one another. The center track-enclosure and the center track components illustrate an inclined roadway surface segment. This assemblage of components forms a segment of a modular roadway having a predetermined size and shape and provides predetermined functionalities.

FIG. 10 A sampling of structural support assemblages comprising components selected from the set of structural support components, but not all structural support components included in this set are illustrated. Each illustrated structural support assemblage implements a support method. The hatched cross sections illustrate the disposition of a modular roadway segment being supported.

FIG. 11 Two modular structures selected from the group of modular structures, but not all structural support components included in this group are illustrated. Illustrated are a rest room structure and an on/off ramp structure. Also shown are segments of roadway surfaces connected to each of the modular structures illustrating how the structure can be connected to a roadway segment such that the roadway surfaces form a contiguous surface allowing users to move from the roadway into the modular structure.

FIG. 12 FIG. 12 illustrates a means to connect a track component to a truss included in a barrier-wall or a track-enclosure component. Further illustrated is a means to connect a structural rib element, included in a track-enclosure component, to this truss, thereby forming a rigid assemblage.

FIG. 13 FIG. 13 illustrates two roadway surfaces, one above the other, within a single track-enclosure assemblage. The lower roadway surface, ref. 1301, provides four traffic lanes for bicycles or other small vehicles. The upper roadway surface, ref. 1303, provides a walkway for pedestrians and runners.

FIG. 14 FIG. 14 illustrates a segment of an enclosed and elevated roadway network, supported by several structural support components positioned at discrete points along the roadway. The illustrated structural supports include different shapes, sizes and support methods.

FIG. 15 Roadway route planning on a map of a city.

DRAWING REFERENCE NUMBERS

Ref. Description FIG.  101 A structural rib element, which provides a means to connect FIG. 1 the roofs, the windows, the vertical barrier elements, the trusses (not shown) and the base covers together. These elements, collectively, form the track enclosure component illustrated.  103 A window element, which is part of the track enclosure FIG. 1 component illustrated.  105 A vertical barrier element, which is part of the track enclosure FIG. 1 component illustrated.  107 A base cover element, which is part of the track enclosure FIG. 1 component illustrated.  109 A track component, which has been selected to be compatible FIG. 1 with the track enclosure component illustrated.  111 A roof element, which is part of the track enclosure component FIG. 1 illustrated.  113 A structural connector. FIG. 1  115 An arch, which is part of the structural support assemblage FIG. 1 illustrated. This arch is further attached to two structural support bases which are further attached to a stable platform, here illustrated as the earth surface.  117 A structural base component selected from the set of structural FIG. 1 support components or it could be a traditional footer embedded into the soil.  119 This line represents the local terrain, the earth's surface at this point. FIG. 1  203 A selected member from the disclosed set of track components, FIG. 2 specifically a straight track component, 4 lanes wide.  205 A selected member from the disclosed set of track components, FIG. 2 specifically a 30 degree, 18 feet radius, horizontal turn track component, 4 lanes wide.  207 A selected member from the disclosed set of track-enclosure FIG. 2 components specifically intended to enclose a particular horizontal turn track component, ref. 205, here illustrated as being 4 lanes wide and having an included turn angle of 30 degrees and a turning radius of 18 feet.  209a A selected member from the disclosed set of track-enclosure FIG. 2 components specifically intended to enclose a length of either the left or right 2 lanes of a straight track component that is more than 2 lanes wide.  209b A second, identical track-enclosure component is shown rotated FIG. 2 180 degrees so as to be suitable for enclosing the remaining 2 lanes of the track component. Accordingly, the two track- enclosure components, ref. 209a and 209b, mate together; thereby enclosing a length of the 4 lane wide track component.  211 Two identical selected members of the disclosed set of FIG. 2 structural support components, here shaped as an arch. Said set includes an inexhaustible supply of replicates of each member.  213 Two structural support bases selected from the disclosed set of FIG. 2 structural support components suitable for structurally supporting the track and track-enclosure assemblage at a desired height relative to the terrain.  215 Bracing, selected from the set of structural support FIG. 2 components; here shown as cross-bracing used to structurally stiffen two structural support components, illustrated as arches.  301 Two roadway surfaces, which are part of the two track FIG. 3 components selected from the set of track components.  303 A structural stiffening and strengthening assemblage, which FIG. 3 supports the roadway surface and is part of the track component. This structural element holds the roadway surface flat and provides a means to connect track elements together and a means to connect track elements to track-enclosure elements.  305 A connector, here illustrated as a bolt, which provides a means FIG. 3 to connect the two track components together.  401 The roadway surface of a straight track component which is FIG. 4 four lanes wide and 48 feet long.  403 The roadway surface of a straight track component which is FIG. 4 four lanes wide and 12 feet long. This component is connected to the track component, ref. 401, in the side-by-side manner and to the track component, ref. 405, in the end-to-end manner.  405 The roadway surface of a horizontal turn track component with FIG. 4 a 30 degree included turning angle and a turn radius of 18 feet which is four lanes wide.  407 The roadway surface of a straight track component which is FIG. 4 four lanes wide and 12 feet long. This component is identical to ref. 403; said set includes an inexhaustible supply of replicates of each member.  409 The roadway surface of a straight transition track component FIG. 4 which smoothly transforms the roadway surface between a four lane wide section and a two lane wide section.  411 The roadway surface of a straight track component which is FIG. 4 two lanes wide and 12 feet long.  413 A plurality of indicium, which indicate the traffic lanes on the FIG. 4 roadway surfaces.  415 A plurality of arrows indicating the intended traffic direction at FIG. 4 particular points on the roadway surface. The intended traffic paths are defined by the traffic lanes as indicated.  417 Illustrating a width vector having a direction, this being FIG. 4 perpendicular to the intended traffic direction, and a value of four lanes wide.  419 A point of attachment where two track components are FIG. 4 connected together in the side-by-side method.  421 Two points of attachment where track components are FIG. 4 connected together in the end-to-end method.  501 A wye shaped track component, intended to provide the FIG. 5 function of allowing a roadway to split into two roadways travelling in different directions. The set of track components includes a plurality of wye shapes having different widths and angles.  503 A horizontal curve shaped track component illustrating a 4 ft. FIG. 5 inside radius, a 20 ft. outside radius and a 30 degree included angle. Such components, having a variety of widths and included angles, are included in the set of track components.  505 A horizontal curve shaped track component, illustrating a 20 ft. FIG. 5 inside radius and a 30 degree included angle. As illustrated, this component could be attached, side by side, to a curve component having a matching outside radius, as per ref. 503.  507 A straight shaped track component, which is a member selected FIG. 5 from the set of track components.  509 A transition shaped track component, intended to provide the FIG. 5 function of allowing a smooth transition between two straight track components having different width values. A variety of such transition components are included in the set of track components so as to provide transitions between all expected combinations of roadway width values.  511 A turn-off track component providing the function of joining FIG. 5 one roadway travelling in a different direction with a primary roadway. The size, shape and functionality illustrated was selected from the set of track components.  513 An intersection track component, which allows two roadways to FIG. 5 cross one another in the same horizontal plane. As illustrated, the intersecting roadways have different widths. The set of track components includes a plurality of intersections having different combinations of roadway widths and different angles of intersection.  515 Two straight track components connected together in a side-by- FIG. 5 side manner.  517 A straight track component connected together with another FIG. 5 having an area that could be designated as a passing lane, an emergency pull-off area or a rest area. Such a track component would provide the designated functionality.  519 A bend track component, which could incorporate an FIG. 5 adjustable bending joint so as to provide a predetermined range of bending angles.  601 A vertical barrier element, which is part of the barrier-wall FIG. 6 component illustrated. This barrier-wall component, as illustrated, does not include an optional roof, window, base or structural rib elements.  603 An external face of the barrier element, ref. 601. Such a face FIG. 6 is provided to enclose the truss, ref. 605, and improve the aerodynamic and aesthetic properties of the barrier-wall.  605 A truss, which strengthens and stiffens the barrier-wall FIG. 6 assemblage so as to allow it to span a predetermined distance while being supported only at its ends.  701 The roadway surface of the track component. FIG. 7  703 The structural strengthening and stiffening assemblage of the FIG. 7 track component.  705 A vertical barrier element, which is part of the barrier-wall FIG. 7 component illustrated. This barrier-wall component, as illustrated, does not include an optional roof, window, base or structural rib elements.  707 A truss, which strengthens and stiffens the barrier-wall FIG. 7 component so as to allow it to span a predetermined distance while being supported only at its ends. As illustrated, this truss is enclosed inside the barrier wall.  709 A point where the track component and the barrier-wall FIG. 7 component are connected together. As illustrated, the truss and the track stiffening assemblage are joined by means of welding, bolting or other well-known fabrication techniques.  801 A passing lane or rest area shaped barrier-wall component, not FIG. 8 including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components.  803 A turn-off shaped barrier-wall component, not including an FIG. 8 optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components.  805 A wye shaped barrier-wall component, not including an optional FIG. 8 roof, selected from the set of track-enclosure components.  807 A bend shaped track-enclosure component, not including an FIG. 8 optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components.  809 An intersection corner shaped barrier-wall component, not FIG. 8 including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components.  811 A horizontal curve shaped barrier-wall component, not FIG. 8 including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components.  813 Another horizontal curve shaped barrier-wall component, not FIG. 8 including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components.  815 A straight shaped barrier-wall component, not including an FIG. 8 optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components.  817 A width transition shaped barrier-wall component, not including FIG. 8 an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components.  819 Two straight shaped barrier-wall components, one positioned FIG. 8 on each side of a straight shaped track component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components.  821 Various track component shapes and sizes illustrating how the FIG. 8 barrier-wall components are intended to mate with and be attached to suitably selected track components.  901 A track-enclosure component included in an assemblage of FIG. 9 components selected to form a segment of a modular roadway.  903 A track-enclosure component included in an assemblage of FIG. 9 components and selected to form a segment of a modular roadway having a predetermined size and shape and provide a vertically inclined roadway surface.  905 A track-enclosure component included in an assemblage of FIG. 9 components selected to form a segment of a modular roadway.  907 A track component included in an assemblage of components FIG. 9 selected to form a segment of a modular roadway.  909 A vertically inclined track component included in an FIG. 9 assemblage of components and selected to form a segment of a modular roadway having a predetermined size and shape and provide a vertically inclined roadway surface.  911 A track component included in an assemblage of components FIG. 9 selected to form a segment of a modular roadway. 1001 A structural support assemblage, comprising a horizontal truss FIG. 10 and two leg components selected from the disclosed set of structural support components, and implementing the support method of hanging a modular roadway segment from the horizontal truss. 1003 A structural support assemblage, comprising an arch support FIG. 10 and two support base components selected from the disclosed set of structural support components, and implementing the support method of hanging a modular roadway segment from the arch. 1005 A structural support assemblage, comprising a horizontal truss FIG. 10 and two leg components selected from the disclosed set of structural support components, and implementing the support method of supporting a modular roadway segment by resting it on the horizontal truss. 1007 A structural support assemblage, comprising an arch support FIG. 10 and two support base components selected from the disclosed set of structural support components, and implementing the support method of supporting a modular roadway segment by resting it on the arch. 1009 Two towers selected from the disclosed set of structural FIG. 10 support components, here illustrated as part of a suspension cable method of supporting a modular roadway segment. 1011 A suspension cable, each end of which is attached to a stable FIG. 10 platform and which passes over two towers. The cable, towers and stable platforms implement a well-know suspension cable support method. 1013 A cantilever beam assemblage, comprising components selected FIG. 10 from the set of structural support components, implementing the support method of supporting a segment of roadway from beneath. 1015 A column, selected from the set of structural support FIG. 10 components. 1021 A stable platform(s) selected from suitable support bases and FIG. 10 support feet included in the set of structural support components. Alternatively, a stable platform can be provided by a traditional footer embedded in the earth. 1031 Cross hatched sections through a modular roadway; and, in FIG. 10 conjunction with the suspension cable, a side elevation of a modular roadway segment partially supported by said suspension cable. 1101 A roof element, included in a modular structure selected from FIG. 11 the disclosed group of modular structures, here illustrated as a rest stop. 1103 A wall element, included in a modular structure selected from FIG. 11 the disclosed group of modular structures, here illustrated as a rest stop. The wall elements define, in part, the function provided by this modular structure. 1105 A roadway surface element, included in a modular structure FIG. 11 selected from the disclosed group of modular structures, here illustrated as a rest stop. 1107 A structural support element selected from the set of structural FIG. 11 supports, here illustrated as a column. 1109 A stable platform to which the column, ref. 1107, is attached. FIG. 11 1121 A roadway surface segment of a modular roadway, to which the FIG. 11 modular structure is attached so as to provide a contiguous roadway surface between the roadway and the functionality provided by the structure. 1131 A roof element, included in a modular structure selected from FIG. 11 the disclosed group of modular structures, here illustrated as a entrance and exit ramp or a station. 1133 A wall element, included in a modular structure selected from FIG. 11 the disclosed group of modular structures, here illustrated as a entrance and exit ramp or a station. 1135 A roadway surface element, included in a modular structure FIG. 11 selected from the disclosed group of modular structures, here illustrated as a entrance and exit ramp or a station. 1137 A structural support column, selected from the set of structural FIG. 11 supports and included in a modular structure selected from the disclosed group of modular structures, here illustrated as a entrance and exit ramp or a station. 1139 A stable platform to which the columns, ref. 1137, are FIG. 11 attached. 1141 A roadway surface segment of a modular roadway, to which the FIG. 11 modular structure is attached so as to provide a contiguous roadway surface between the roadway and the functionality provided by the structure. 1250 A section of a barrier wall, here partially cut away to expose a FIG. 12 truss and assembly details. 1255 A truss, included in a track-enclosure component. FIG. 12 1257 An attachment bracket and bolts which provide a means to FIG. 12 attach the track element to the truss. 1259 An attachment plate and bolts which provide a means to FIG. 12 connect the truss to an adjoining truss (not shown) and thereby connect barrier-wall or track-enclosure components together. 1261 An attachment bracket which provides a means to attach a FIG. 12 structural rib, ref. 1269, to the truss. 1265 A structural assembly, included in a track component, which FIG. 12 provides a means to attach the track component to a barrier- wall or track-enclosure component. 1267 The roadway surface of the track component illustrated. FIG. 12 1269 Structural ribs which connect the truss, the barrier wall, and FIG. 12 other elements of a track-enclosure component together. 1301 A first track component, intended for bicycles and other small FIG. 13 vehicles. 1303 A second track component, intended for pedestrians and FIG. 13 runners. 1305 A track-enclosure component attached to and enclosing the two FIG. 13 track components. 1401 The earth's surface beneath a segment of an elevated roadway FIG. 14 network. 1403 Stable platforms or structural support bases which hold the FIG. 14 structural supports in a desired disposition relative to the earth's surface. 1405 A street. FIG. 14 1409 A suspension cable, selected from the set of structural support FIG. 14 components. 1411 Towers, supporting the suspension cable, selected from the set FIG. 14 of structural support components. 1415a Structural supports, supporting the segment of elevated FIG. 14 roadway, ref. 1421a. This segment of roadway providing an assent and descent function for the roadway surface. Said structural supports have a predetermined shape, size and support method and were selected from the set of structural support components so as to be suitable to support this segment of roadway in a desired disposition and at a desired elevation. 1415b An arch shaped structural support, selected from the set of FIG. 14 structural supports, in part, so it will straddle and not interfere with the preexisting street below, ref. 1405. 1421a A module, included in the roadway to provide an assent and FIG. 14 descent function. 1421b A module, included in the roadway to provide a horizontal FIG. 14 travel direction function. 1421c Several modules attached together and included in the roadway FIG. 14 to provide a longer span over a ravine or river. This section of roadway is supported by an assemblage comprising a suspension cable and towers.

GLOSSARY

Additional, accessory and optional components: As used here; an additional, accessory or optional component is a member of the disclosed master-set of components that is not intended to serve a critical role in the structural configuration of an enclosed and elevated roadway. That is to say, such a roadway could be configured and function without including said components. However, these components serve to provide valuable functions including, but not limited to, interior and exterior lighting, heating or ventilation, signage, information and traffic control systems. And, to provide functions intended to benefit a neighborhood through which the roadway may pass such as providing wire conduits to house telephone or electric wires, solar power units to be mounted on the roof or grow-lights mounted on the underside.

Bicycles and other small vehicles: Bicycles, as used here, is meant to include not only conventional bicycles but all sorts of polycycles including, but not limited to, tricycles, quad cycles, bicycles towing a trailer, bicycles for two or more riders and various forms of recumbent, hand operated and related cycles. Other small vehicles is intended to refer to manual and motorized scooters, wheelchairs, Segways®, motor bikes and other lightweight, personal transport vehicles. In addition, it is intended to include two or more such vehicles attached to one another, such as a bike train. (See motorized)

Barrier-wall: A barrier-wall, as used here, is a wall or guard-rail and a truss intended to be and suitable for attaching to a track component. The barrier-wall provides two functions: first, to direct traffic-flow along the roadway surface and, second, to provide sufficient structural strength so as to allow the assemblage of a track component and one or more barrier-walls to span a predetermined distance while being supported only at each end. Typically, there will be two barrier-walls attached to a track component; one on each side of the roadway surface and running in the intended traffic direction. Whereas some barrier-walls are straight, others will be curved or have other shapes so as to conform to the shape of the track component with which it is intended to be assembled. It should be noted that a track-enclosure-component is also a barrier-wall; however, the wall typically extends upward to connect with a roof element and it includes a side window that may be disposed in an angular position with respect to the wall. (See truss, track-enclosure-component)

CAD: CAD, as used here, means a computer program(s) intended to provide Computer Assisted Design. Such computer programs are readily available and well know to those familiar with the art of mechanical or architectural design.

Catastrophic force: A catastrophic force, as used here in association with a structural-support-base, means an unintended force or blow to the base such as might happen when the base is struck by a motor vehicle. Since this base is, in part, supporting a section of the roadway, it would be desirable to prevent such a force from being transmitted to the roadway. And, if the base is bent or dislodged, to have a means for it to break free from the structural-support component so that the roadway structure is not severely damaged. Such a means is disclosed in the form of a shear pin or shear ring.

City: As used here, city means a representative geographical region. It is used solely to simplify and clarify explanations and should not be construed to restrict the context of these explanations. (See geographical region)

Component: Component, as used here, generally refers to a member of a master-set of components disclosed in this invention. These components are designed such that suitable combinations can be selected from the disclosed master-set that are suitable to be mated and connected together and thereby forming modular sections of an enclosed and elevated roadway. Said components are categorized into track components, barrier-wall components, track-enclosure components, structural-support components, structural-support-bases, connectors and other optional components. (See set, master-set)

Connector: A connector, as used here, refers to members of the disclosed master-set of components that serve to connect or attach together a structural-support component and section of an elevated roadway. It is, in essence, a bracket and is typically adjustable so as to allow the structural-support component to be positioned an arbitrary, albeit small, distance away from the section of roadway and to allow the two objects to be orientated at an arbitrary angle with respect to one another.

Disclosed set: The disclosed set or master-set, as used here, refers all of the pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured member components disclosed in this invention together with any other components and other objects that may be incorporated when assembling or constructed an enclosed, elevated roadway, including an inexhaustible supply of replicates of any of said components. (See set, master-set)

Enclosed roadway—An enclosed roadway, as used here, refers to a roadway where the track components comprising the roadway surface and the means for structurally stiffening and strengthening said surface are enclosed. Whereas said track components can be enclosed by a separate and independent structure, a more typical embodiment is to enclose the track components by joining track-enclosure components with them so as to enclose the roadway and protect it from the rain. (See roadway)

Elevated: Elevated, as used here, does not necessarily mean ‘above ground’. Here we refer to an elevated roadway meaning that the ‘elevation’ is specified and intended to be maintained. The desired elevation of the roadway at a given point is established by means of structural-support components attached to the roadway. These components typical include columns, arches and beams which, in turn, are supported by the ground or other stable objects such as a nearby structure, and the brackets and fasteners needed to attach them to the roadway. (See elevation)

Elevation: Elevation, as used here, means the measured distance above or below a reference elevation. For example, topological survey maps often refer to elevation as the height above (or below) sea level. One might, for example, specify ground level at the main starting point as Elevation=0. Then, each point along the roadway and anywhere within the network of roadways would be ‘elevated’ by plus or minus some specified number of feet or meters.

Functionality: Functionality, as relates to a section of roadway and as used here, means the features or capabilities available to a user in or near a particular section of an enclosed, elevated roadway. Said features or capabilities include, but are not limited to; traffic lanes, which enable a user to walk, run, bicycle or drive some other small vehicle along the roadway; passing lanes; rest stops; exits and entrances; exit and entrance ramps; turnoffs, which allow the user to turn onto another roadway travelling in a different direction; intersections, which allow user travelling on one roadway to cross-over a roadway going in another direction; and a plurality of other features or capabilities that may be necessary or desired within a roadway network. (See network)

Geographical Region: As used here, a geographical region means a region or area on a map. Such regions would typically be, but not be limited to, countries, states, counties, municipalities, towns, cities, university campuses, military bases and industrial or recreational areas. They do not have to be contiguous regions; one could be, for example, several cooperating nearby villages.

Implementation time: Implementation time, as used here, means the period of time that elapses between starting the planning process and actual commencement of operations. It would include time to plan, design, engineer, configure, assemble and construct the roadway network. In addition, it would include the time required to acquire rights-of-way, zoning and construction permits, solicit and accept bids from contractors, hiring and training personnel to operate the facilities, prepare needed rules and regulations and pass any required legislation. These, however, are not the only functions that must be accomplished, but are listed as examples of the many tasks that need to be done.

Intended traffic direction: The term intended traffic direction, as used here, means the predetermined and intended direction of traffic-flow travelling on the roadway surface; it is defined for each point on the roadway surface. Whereas, in the case of a straight track component the intended traffic direction typically points along the length of the roadway surface and is the same for every point on the roadway surface; however, this would not be the case for an arch shaped, curved, wye shaped or X-shaped track component. In such cases, the intended traffic direction will change so as to continually point in the expected direction a pedestrian or bicycle rider would travel. The width of a track-section at a particular point on the roadway surface, then, has a value equal to the distance from one edge of the track component to the opposing edge measured perpendicular to the intended traffic direction at said point. (See width)

Master-set: The term master-set, as used here, means a set containing all of the components disclosed in this invention. For the purposes of simplification and clarity, this master-set, herein, is typically broken into several sub-sets; specifically, sets classified as track components, barrier-wall components, track-enclosure components, structural-support components, structural-support-bases, connectors and optional components. (See set)

Intended Functions: Here, when used in the context of a network of elevated, enclosed roadways, the ‘intended functions’ means, but is not limited to nor required to include all of the following:

    • To provide a convenient, reliable and safe means for any qualified person to be able to quickly and easily access the network from any point in a region and travel to and exit the network at the same or any other point within the region while travelling by foot, bicycle or any other suitable, small-vehicle.
    • To provide a convenient, safe and pleasant recreational facility that allows and encourages people to walk, roller-blade, ride bicycles or use any other suitable small-vehicle for the purpose of exercise, pleasure or recreation.
    • To incorporate a means to provide other valuable functions for the benefit of the community at large.
    • To provide an alternative emergency transportation system for the community.

Member: Member, as used here, means one of the objects in a set of components; specifically the set being discussed. However, since all sets and all subsets, as the terms are used here, are also subsets of the ‘master-set’ disclosed herein, member also means a component of the master-set.

Method: The term ‘method’ is used to refer to a method of supporting an elevated roadway such as by suspending it from a structural-support component, resting it on top of a structural-support component, or attaching it in some another position on or near a structural-support component. In addition, the term is used as a method of connecting track components together including a side-by-side method and an end-to-end method. And, there may also be other obvious usages of the word.

Modular section: A modular section, as used here, refers to a section of roadway that has been assembled from components of the disclosed master-set of components. Such a modular section of roadway is intended to be, and is suitable to be, joined with and connected to other modular sections; and, by so connecting several modular sections together, to form a section of an enclosed and elevated roadway. (See roadway)

Motorized: Motorized, as used here, means mainly electric motors, hydrogen powered fuel cell powered motors and/or such other means of powering small, lightweight vehicles that is quiet, non-polluting and environmentally friendly.

Network of roadways: Network, as used here, means several elevated and enclosed roadways interconnected to each other so as to form an array of roadways that also includes access and egress capabilities at various points throughout a geographical region. The network may also include additional functionalities such as, but not limited to, passing lanes, rest stops, lighting systems, security systems, usage control systems and parking facilities. Ideally, the network would allow a user located at any point within the region to quickly and easily gain access to the network and, by utilizing one or more of the interconnected roadways, travel to an egress point close to his desired destination, which could be at any other point within the region.

Operate: Here, when used in the context of a network of elevated, enclosed roadways operate means to fulfill ‘the intended functions’ in a smooth, reliable and safe manner. (See intended functions)

Pedestrian: Pedestrians, as used here, means people walking but also is intended to include people using non-motorized devices such as skates, scooters or wheelchairs. It also, could include devices used by the elderly or physically disabled persons such as walkers, motorized wheelchairs, motorized scooter-like devices as well as guide dogs. Furthermore, it is intended to include people standing, walking, exercising and doing other recreational or physical training activities.

Planning process: Planning process, as used here, refers to the actions or steps taken and techniques employed by those who plan, design, engineer, configure, assemble, construct, implement, operate, maintain or incorporate future upgrades into a roadway network utilizing the disclosed master-set of components. Clearly, without the availability of the disclosed master-set of components, a process utilizing them would be impossible.

Pre-designed: Pre-designed, as used here, refers to one aspect of the disclosed master-set of pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured components disclosed in this invention. Pre-designed means that all member components of the master-set have pre-determined common and complimentary characteristics as regards the materials used in their manufacture, their general appearance, their dimensions, their interchangeability, their interconnectivity, the methods by which they are selected and assembled as well as other design elements.

Pre-engineered: Pre-engineered, as used here, refers to one aspect of the disclosed master-set of pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured components disclosed in this invention. Pre-engineered means that each member component has been, but not limited to only these functions, structurally designed, analyzed and fabricated with appropriate materials and materials of sufficient strength and sufficient rigidity so as to ensure that it, when combined with other compatible component members, has workable and structurally sound means for assembly into an elevated, enclosed roadway. And, that each section of an assembled roadway has sufficient strength and rigidity to support expected loads, and is capable of withstanding anticipated weather conditions and has an acceptable life expectancy. And, that each component could be deemed suitable for its intended use by experts in the field of elevated transportation systems design and construction.

Pre-manufactured: Pre-manufactured, as used here, refers to one aspect of the disclosed master-set of pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured components disclosed in this invention. Pre-manufactured means that components have been pre-assembled into assemblies, here generally referred to as ‘members’. Generally, this means that the pre-manufactured components need only to be mated and connected to other pre-manufactured components in the field. This, then, is intended to allow a minimum amount of time and construction effort required in the field; and, in turn, that the field assembly and construction of an enclosed, elevated roadway network, by making use of the disclosed master-set of components, can be performed with a minimum amount of time and expense and with a minimum degree of interference with ongoing activities at the construction site.

Process: Process, as used here, refers to the steps and the sequences of these steps taken by those who plan, design, engineer, configure, assemble, construct, implement, operate, maintain or incorporate future upgrades into a roadway network utilizing the disclosed master-set of components. Clearly, without the availability of the disclosed master-set of components, a process utilizing them would be impossible.

Roadway: A roadway, as this term is used here, refers to one or more pieces of track components, track-enclosure components and support structures, but not necessary all of these, joined together so as to form an enclosed and elevated walkway or pathway suitable for use by bicycles, other small vehicles or pedestrians, usually over 100 ft long but which can be many miles long. This roadway typically has between one and six travel lanes and, at different locations along the roadway will have extra functionality added such as, but not limited to, passing lanes, rest stops, exits and entrances and turnoffs to allow the user to turn onto another roadway travelling in a different direction. Often the width of a roadway will change, for example, change from four lanes to six lanes and this will require a transition track component so the width change occurs in a smooth and gradual manner.

Roadway Designer's Manual: The ‘Roadway Designer's Manual’, as used here, is a document that presents a compilation of the disclosed component members in a structured and organized manner. It is, in essence, a printed or digitized product catalog that presents the pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured master-set of components in a manner such that a planner or designer could readily and intuitively consider and select components to configure an appropriate modular section of roadway. Included in said document is, for each component member, but not limited to just this information; its size, shape and other relevant physical properties; detailed descriptions of its intended use and function; available options and variations; cost data so as to allow costing estimates to be calculated; and, engineering data so as to allow a designer to select appropriate components that can be readily and effectively assembled into a modular roadway section.

Roadway Computer Assisted Design Software and Database: The ‘Roadway Computer Assisted Design Software and Database’, as used here, is a database containing the shape, size, materials and other physical properties for each of the disclosed component members in a structured and organized manner; and, a CAD software program that is capable of accessing this database such that a roadway designer can select components and, as typically done by users of such computer software, arrange and combine components into assemblages. And, with such a CAD system, be able to combining such assemblages into sections of roadway and to display and plot such displays so as to render drawings of the roadway designs.

Roadway surface: Roadway surface, as used here, means the top side of a roadway; the surface contacted by pedestrians or vehicles using the roadway. The roadway surface may be rigid or a flexible material. In either case, the roadway surface is structurally supported and held more-or-less flat by a structural supporting means. The roadway surface, typically, is marked to indicate traffic lanes, turns, directional arrows and other markings intended to convey information to users.

Set, Master-set, Subset: A set, as used here, means a multitude of objects having something in common, and where there is an inexhaustible supply of replicates of each of the objects. The term ‘master-set’ has no separate meaning or significance except to emphasize that some objects selected from the master-set then become members of another, albeit smaller, set or what can be referred to as a subset. Each object within any set can also be referred to as a ‘member’ of the set. In this invention, the disclosed master-set of pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured components refers to all the various widths and lengths of track components; all the various track-enclosure components; all the roadway track components functionalities such as passing lanes, exit ramps and rest stations; all the roadway structural-support components; all the connectors and braces; all the accessories, optional and add-on components such as solar panels that can be added to the roof or misting stations added over the track components; and, any other objects that may be added from time to time. The common characteristic of this master-set is that all of the members are designed for and intended to be used in an assemblage for the construction of a section of an enclosed and elevated roadway.

Small vehicle: A small vehicle, as the term is used here, means a vehicle weighing less than 500 lbs. The vehicle may or may not be motorized. This term is intended to include human powered vehicles such as scooters and wheelchairs as well as motorized vehicles such as the Segway®, various other two, three and four wheeled motorized vehicles and a multitude of variations of polycycles. Since motors using a petroleum based fuel tend to generate noxious exhaust and considerable noise, they would not be a preferred option; nonetheless, they are not intended to be excluded from this term. (See bicycles)

Stable platform: A stable platform, as used here, means an object whose position and orientation relative to the earth cannot move or be moved. The earth itself and the terrain, as used here, constitute two examples of a stable platform. Other pertinent examples are a structure, a column or a pole all of which are firmly connected to the earth. The term, stable platform, is used here in relationship to a structural support assemblage supporting a section of an enclosed and elevated roadway. Specifically, such an assemblage resting on or being attached to a stable platform while, simultaneously, is rigidly attached to a section of roadway means that the section of roadway will be held at a specific elevation and orientation with respect to the earth and the nearby terrain.

Structural support: A structural support, as used here, means an assemblage of structural components configured so as to suitable hold a section of elevated roadway at a desired elevation and orientation. Typically, a structural support consists of a structural-support component, such as a beam or an arch, one or more connectors which attach a section of roadway to the structural-support component and two structural-support-bases.

Structural-support component: A structural-support component, as used here, refers to, but is not limited to, a beam, an arch, a cable, a column or a pole whose purpose is to support or hold a section of roadway at a particular elevation and orientation. Typically; in conjunction with such structural-support components there will be a connector, whose purpose is to interconnect the section of roadway and the support structure; and one or more structural-support-bases, whose purpose is to interconnect the support structure and a stable platform such as the earth or another existing structure.

Subset: Subset, as used here, means some, but not all, of the objects (members) of a set. (See Set, Master-Set)

Track component: A track component, as used here, refers to a piece of roadway surface upon which a bicycle or other small vehicle rests or rolls and/or a person walks together with the structural strengthening or stiffening members to which it is affixed. Track components are disclosed that have, but are not limited to having, different widths, say two or four lanes wide; different shapes, say straight, horizontal curves or inclined; and, different functionalities, say four riding lanes plus two inside turning lanes or an exit ramp or an intersection between two roadways.

Track-enclosure component: A track-enclosure component, as used here, refers to an assembly consisting of a roof; one or two side walls, each of which may or may not contain windows; an optional base enclosure; one or more trusses designed to strengthen the assembly in the lengthwise direction, these typically being incorporated into the walls(s); external, circumferential structural elements to which the roof, side walls(s), trusses and base enclosure are affixed so as to maintain their relative positions with respect to one another; and, with or without any combination of accessories and optional components and other components and functionalities not specifically referred to. A track-enclosure component refers to such an assembly having a particular size and shape. Track-enclosure components are disclosed that are designed and engineered to mate with the various disclosed track components thereby enclosing, or partially enclosing, the track components such that the roof covers the track component's roadway surface, the wall(s) support the roof and protect a user and prevent him from falling off the roadway and the base encloses the area beneath the roadway surface and the roadway structural supporting element. In cases where a roadway lies within a covered structure, and said covered structure ‘encloses’ the roadway, a barrier-wall may be substituted for a track-enclosure component. (See barrier-wall, truss)

Traffic-flow: Traffic-flow, as used here, means the pedestrians, bicycles or other small vehicles on the roadway surface and travelling along the roadway.

Truss: A truss, as used here, means a rigid framework, beam or other elongated structural load-bearing component intended to span a predetermined distance between two or more points from which it is being supported; and, while being supported by these points, to have sufficient strength and stiffness to suitably support a section of an elevated roadway being used by pedestrians, bicycles and other small vehicles to which it is attached. Accordingly, the term is not intended to be only a truss but can also be a beam or other form of elongated structural element. Such a truss is included in track-enclosure components and in the barrier-wall components and, when these components are mated with and attached to a track component, the resulting assemblage will have sufficient strength and stiffness to span the distance between the adjacent structural-supports while supporting its design loadings. (See barrier-wall, track-enclosure component)

Width: As relates to a track component, the term width, as used here, means a vector having a value equal to the distance from one edge of the track component's roadway surface to the opposing edge measured perpendicular to the intended traffic direction at any particular point on said roadway surface. The direction of the width is perpendicular to the intended traffic direction at any particular point on said roadway surface. (See intended traffic direction)

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

One aspect of this invention is the disclosure of a master-set of components that are intended to be and can be assembled into modular sections of an enclosed and elevated roadway suitable for transportation and recreational uses by people using bicycles, other small vehicles, walking, running or using devices such as skates or scooters.

Where said master-set's member components are designed and engineered in such a manner and include members having a sufficient variety of designs and functionalities and a sufficient range of physical properties; such that someone familiar with the master-set will be able to select members that are suitable to be assembled together into a modular section of an enclosed, elevated roadway having a desired size and shape and include desired functionalities.

Furthermore, where said modular section of roadway can be readily mated with and connected to other modular sections so as to form a contiguous enclosed and elevated roadway system of a desired shape and size and having desired functionalities at each point along the roadway.

The term ‘functionalities’ is used herein to indicate that the roadway has, in addition to the normal traffic lanes used to travel along the roadway, provisions for additional functions such as passing lanes, turning lanes, merging lanes, rest stop areas, emergency pull-off lanes or areas, entrance and exit ramps and other functions. Accordingly, at each point along the roadway there may or may not be some of these additional functionalities; and, therefore, when designing or planning a modular section of the roadway that particular section may or may not include any additional functionality.

Another aspect of this invention is that each of said modular sections of roadway will be compatible with, but not limited to just these; the geographical terrain at its location within the roadway; the pre-existing and planned land use at said location; the desired elevation and three-dimensional direction of travel for the roadway at said location; the desired traffic-flow capacity at said location; and, the desired roadway functionality at said location.

And, in addition, said master-set of component members includes additional components as may be necessary or desired to improve the general appeal and features of a roadway system, to benefit the users of the roadway and/or to benefit a community near to or through which the roadway passes and/or to provide other valuable functions.

For the purposes of simplification and explanation, said master-set can be divided into several smaller sets or subsets of components, each containing a particular type or category of component. Representative illustrations of some of these components and the manner in which they could be assembled together are shown, conceptually, in FIG. 2.

The categories of component members of the disclosed master-set are:

    • Track components: These form the actual roadway. Each member is comprised of a roadway surface, a means for structural stiffening and strengthening of said surface, a means for connecting selected track component members to other track components, and a means for connecting track component members to track-enclosure components.
    • Track-enclosure components: These form the sides and roof to enclose the track components. Each member is comprised of a roof element; one or more side walls that may or may not contain windows; an optional base enclosure element; a truss running in the direction of traffic-flow; and, rib-like structural strengthening elements that connect all the elements together. These components are suitable for being mated together with other suitable track-enclosure components. And, they are compatible with and suitable for mating with and partially enclosing a member selected from the set of track components.
    • Barrier-walls: A barrier-wall is related to the track-enclosure components in the sense that it can be used instead of or in place of a track-enclosure component. It consists of a similar side wall and truss as found in the track-enclosure components; however, it does not have the roof, windows, base enclosure or the rib-like strengthening elements. Accordingly, it does not enclose the track components.
    • Structural-support components: These are arches, A-frames, beams, columns and other objects that support the roadway at the desired elevation. Each member implements a particular support or suspension method; and, each member is of sufficient strength and is of suitable size and shape to support one or more modular sections of an enclosed and elevated roadway at a desired elevation and in a desired orientation with respect to the nearby terrain.
    • Connectors and Braces: Connectors are used to connect a track-enclosure component and a structural-supporting-component, one to the other. Braces include well-known methods for connecting together and stiffening a structural framework comprised of one or more structural-support components; cross-bracing by means of rigid or cable-like elements being one example.
    • Structural-support-bases: These are elongated objects that are attached to the terrain or other immovable object or structure at one end, the bottom, and a structural-support component at the other end, the top. Each base is typically adjustable in height and intended and suitable for supporting at least one leg or point of a structural-support component at a desired elevation; having one end resting on or attached to a stable platform and the other end attached to the structural-support component.
    • Accessory and optional components: These are additional components as may be necessary or desired to improve the function of the roadway, to benefit the users of the roadway and/or to benefit a community near to or through which the roadway passes and/or to provide other valuable functions. Such functions include, but are not limited to, utility wire conduits beneath the roadway surface, solar panels mounted on the roof, interior and exterior lighting, signage and traffic control signals and grow-lights underneath the roadway.

As would be evident to one familiar with the art of structural design and construction, the specific features associated with any particular one of said types of components could, in many cases, be transferred to an alternative component type with no net change relating to the availability or function of the feature. As an example, whereas the track-enclosure component is described as having a truss element, this element could be eliminated and transferred to a track component with no net loss or gain of function; or, it could be eliminated entirely. And so, alternative combinations resulting in a particular feature or function becoming associated with an alternative type of component is also intended to be disclosed in this invention.

FIG. 1 illustrates a representative modular section of an enclosed, elevated roadway for bicycles, other small vehicles or pedestrians.

FIG. 2 illustrates, conceptually, how several members of the disclosed master-set of components might be selected and assembled to begin the configuration of a section of enclosed and elevated roadway. Illustrated are a straight track component, ref. 203, and a horizontally turning track component, ref. 205; both of which are four lanes wide.

Also illustrated is a track-enclosure component, ref. 207, which is suitable to be mated with and enclose the horizontally turning tack-component, ref. 205. In addition, there are two identical track-enclosure components, ref. 209a and 209b, one rotated 180 degrees with respect to the other, that are suitable to be mated together and both to be mated with a straight track component four lanes wide, ref. 203; thereby enclosing a section of said straight track component.

Also in FIG. 2, ref. 211 refers to one of two structural-support components shaped as arches. Each of these arches has, in turn, two structural-support-bases, each of which is adjustable in height, ref. 213, one on each leg of the arch. Said arch structural-support components and structural-support-bases are designed and engineered so as to be suitable to support a predetermined length of the roadway at a certain elevation relative to the terrain upon which the structural-support-bases are intended to rest. Finally, ref. 215 illustrates cross-bracing to structurally stiffen the entire structure comprised of all the components illustrated.

FIG. 5 shows a small sampling of some additional components, categorized as track components, included in the disclosed master-set of components. More specifically, illustrated are:

501 A wye shaped track component, intended to provide the FIG. 5 function of allowing a roadway to split into two roadways travelling in different directions. The set of track components includes a plurality of wye shapes having different widths and angles. 503 A horizontal curve shaped track component illustrating a 4 ft. FIG. 5 inside radius, a 20 ft. outside radius and a 30 degree included angle. Such components, having a variety of widths and included angles, are included in the set of track components. 505 A horizontal curve shaped track component, illustrating a 20 ft. FIG. 5 inside radius and a 30 degree included angle. As illustrated, this component could be attached, side by side, to a curve component having a matching outside radius, as per ref. 503. 507 A straight shaped track component, which is a member selected from the FIG. 5 set of track components. 509 A transition shaped track component, intended to provide the FIG. 5 function of allowing a smooth transition between two straight track components having different width values. A variety of such transition components are included in the set of track components so as to provide transitions between all expected combinations of roadway width values. 511 A turn-off track component providing the function of joining FIG. 5 one roadway travelling in a different direction with a primary roadway. The size, shape and functionality illustrated was selected from the set of track components. 513 An intersection track component, which allows two roadways to FIG. 5 cross one another in the same horizontal plane. As illustrated, the intersecting roadways have different widths. The set of track components includes a plurality of intersections having different combinations of roadway widths and different angles of intersection. 515 Two straight track components connected together in a side-by- FIG. 5 side manner. 517 A straight track component connected together with another FIG. 5 having an area that could be designated as a passing lane, an emergency pull-off area or a rest area. Such a track component would provide the designated functionality. 519 A bend track component, which could incorporate an FIG. 5 adjustable bending joint so as to provide a predetermined range of bending angles.

These, however, are only a representative sampling of track components, and not all track components included in the disclosed master-set.

FIG. 4 illustrates six track components connected together according to two methods. Also illustrated are two reference directions used herein when referring to track components.

The first is called the intended traffic direction and is indicated by arrows; the arrow indicates the intended traffic direction at that point.

The second direction is called the ‘width direction’ and is also defined for each point on the roadway surface. The ‘width’ is a vector and has both a value and a direction. The ‘width direction’, at a specific point is perpendicular to the intended traffic direction. The ‘width value’ is the distance from one edge of the roadway surface to the opposing edge travelling in the direction perpendicular to the intended traffic direction at said point and passing through said point.

Ref. 417 represents the width value of the track component, ref. 401, this being four lanes wide. Here, as is the case with all rectangular track components, the width is the same and constant for every point on the roadway surface. However, for non-rectangular track components, the curved track component, ref. 405, for example, the intended traffic direction and the width direction change as one moves from one end to the other. In this particular case, the value of the width remains constant; it is four lanes wide. Other track components, ref 409, as an example, have a width value that changes from four lanes wide to six lanes wide.

Also, when referring to track components there are 4 or more edges. Two edges, herein referred to as the ‘ends’ are edges perpendicular to the intended traffic direction. Two edges herein referred to as the ‘sides’ are the edges perpendicular to the width direction. Some track components have more complex shapes and more than four edges; accordingly, when the terms ends and sides are used herein, they should generally be considered in the context of a simple shaped track section.

FIG. 3 shows two track components where the roadway surface has been partially cut away to expose a structural stiffening assembly below, ref. 303. Also shown is a bolt, ref. 305, which can pass through the structural assemblies of the adjoining track components to connect them together.

FIG. 4 illustrates the method and means of connecting track components side-by-side:

Shown as ref. 401 is a straight track component which is four lanes wide and 48 feet long; and, as ref. 403, another straight track component, which is also four lanes wide and 12 feet long. These two track components can be connected side-by-side by means of bolts passing through the structural strengthening elements beneath the roadway surface; however, bolts are not the only means of connecting track components side-by-side and should not be construed as the preferred method. By so connecting these track-sections together, a roadway surface eight lanes wide has been created.

FIG. 4 also illustrates a second method of connecting track components together; herein referred to as the end-to-end method:

Also illustrated in FIG. 4 are a horizontal turn track component with a 30 degree included turning angle and a turn radius of 18 feet, ref. 405; another straight track component, ref. 407 which is four lanes wide and 12 feet long; a transition track component smoothly merging four lanes into two lanes, ref. 409; and, another straight track component two lanes wide and 12 feet long, ref. 411. These five track components, ref. 403, 405, 407, 409, 411 are connected together, end-to-end so as to form a contiguous length of roadway surface making a right turn. These five track components can be connected end-to-end by means of bolts passing through the structural strengthening elements beneath the roadway surface; however, bolts are not to only means of connecting track components end-to-end and should not be construed as the preferred method.

FIG. 8 shows another small sampling of components included in the disclosed master-set of components; specifically, these being barrier-wall components. Such members of the set of barrier-wall components are designed so as to interface with compatible track components as conceptually illustrated in FIG. 7.

It should be noted that, as disclosed above (see GLOSSARY, term “Barrier-Wall” and term “Track-Enclosure component”), the term track-enclosure component is used herein to describe a barrier-wall component wherein the wall extends up to a roofline and includes windows, a roof, an optional base cover and structural ribs to strengthen the assemblage and connect the elements together. Accordingly, for each size and shape of barrier-wall component, it is hereby disclosed that there is a track-enclosure component which includes a similarly sized and shaped barrier wall and truss.

Similarly, using the terminology of “sets”, the set of barrier-wall components includes members with a roof and members without the roof. Those members including the roof, windows and structural ribs constitute a sub-set, herein referred to as the set of track-enclosure components. However, all members of the set of barrier-wall components are characterized by having a vertical wall element and the elongated structural element, such as a truss.

Illustrated are the following barrier-wall_components:

801 A passing lane or rest area shaped barrier-wall component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. 803 A turn-off shaped barrier-wall component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. 805 A wye shaped barrier-wall component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. 807 A bend shaped barrier-wall component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. 809 An intersection corner shaped barrier-wall component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. 811 A horizontal curve shaped barrier-wall component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. 813 Another horizontal curve shaped barrier-wall component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. 815 A straight shaped barrier-wall component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. 817 A width transition shaped barrier-wall component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. 819 Two straight shaped barrier-wall components, one positioned on each side of a straight shaped track component, not including an optional roof, selected from the set of barrier-wall components. 821 Various track component shapes and sizes illustrating how the barrier-wall components are intended to mate with and be attached to suitably selected track components.

These, however, are only a representative sampling of members of barrier-wall components, and do not comprise all barrier-wall_components included in said master-set.

FIG. 9 illustrates three track-enclosure components attached to each other and each, respectively, being further attached to a suitable track component. Of particular interest are the center components, ref. 903 and 909, which implement an incline and descent of the roadway surface. It should also be noted that replicates of the two track-enclosure components, ref. 901 and 905, could be selected from the set of track-enclosure components and connected to the assemblage so as to enclose the roadway surface. In the case of the center track-enclosure, ref. 903, because of the incline and the resulting angled edges, an alternative component would have to be selected which is a mirror image of ref. 903 in order to complete the enclosure of the roadway surface.

FIG. 10 illustrates a small sampling of components that are also included in the disclosed master-set of components; these being various structural-support components and methods.

Such support structures are designed and engineered so as to provide various alternative means and methods to support a section of the roadway at an appropriate elevation and orientation.

1001 A structural support assemblage, comprising a horizontal truss FIG. 10 and two leg components selected from the disclosed set of structural support components, and implementing the support method of hanging a modular roadway segment from the horizontal truss. 1003 A structural support assemblage, comprising an arch support FIG. 10 and two support base components selected from the disclosed set of structural support components, and implementing the support method of hanging a modular roadway segment from the arch. 1005 A structural support assemblage, comprising a horizontal truss FIG. 10 and two leg components selected from the disclosed set of structural support components, and implementing the support method of supporting a modular roadway segment by resting it on the horizontal truss. 1007 A structural support assemblage, comprising an arch support FIG. 10 and two support base components selected from the disclosed set of structural support components, and implementing the support method of supporting a modular roadway segment by resting it on the arch. 1009 Two towers selected from the disclosed set of structural FIG. 10 support components, here illustrated as part of a suspension cable method of supporting a modular roadway segment. 1011 A suspension cable, each end of which is attached to a stable FIG. 10 platform and which passes over two towers. The cable, towers and stable platforms implement a well-know suspension cable support method. 1013 A cantilever beam assemblage, comprising components selected FIG. 10 from the set of structural support components, implementing the support method of supporting a segment of roadway from beneath. 1015 A column, selected from the set of structural support FIG. 10 components. 1021 A stable platform(s) selected from suitable support bases and FIG. 10 support feet included in the set of structural support components. Alternatively, a stable platform can be provided by a traditional footer embedded in the earth. 1031 Cross hatched sections through a modular roadway; and, in FIG. 10 conjunction with the suspension cable, a side elevation of a modular roadway segment partially supported by said suspension cable.

It should be noted that the relative position of the roadway sectional outlines, as illustrated in FIG. 10, is only one of many possible positions of the roadways, relative to the supporting structures. Furthermore, support methods and components such as those indicated as ref. 1013 and ref. 1015, include columns or posts that could be existing objects, but are not intended to be exclusively existing objects, such as existing utility poles.

These, however, are only a representative sampling of members of structural-support components, and do not comprise all structural-support components included in said master-set.

As has been disclosed above and as is well known to one familiar with the art of structural supports, structures such as those illustrated in FIG. 10, will often require or benefit from “Connectors and Braces” and “Structural-support-bases”, said terms being defined and disclosed above. Accordingly, the disclosed set of structural supports is intended to also include sub-sets of these elements.

FIG. 3 is an illustration showing the fabrication details of one embodiment of a track component. Here, the roadway surface, as Illustrated, ref. 301, could be composed of a rigid material such as wooden or synthetic boards. An alternative embodiment of such a roadway surface is a rigid platform or sub-surface such as plywood covered by a flexible covering. Accordingly, a layered roadway surface construction is also disclosed.

FIG. 12 is a detail view showing a means for attaching a truss to a track component and a means for attaching a truss to external rib-like structures that connect the roof, the side wall, the track component and the base element together. Illustrated is:

    • Ref. 1261—A bracket attached to the truss, ref. 1255, providing a means to attach an external rib-like structural support element, ref 1269, to the truss.
    • Ref. 1265—A structural assembly providing a means for strengthening and stiffening the roadway surface. Illustrated here is one manner for connecting said assembly to the truss; this being by means of bolts passing through said assembly and the structural anchoring element of the truss, ref. 1257.
    • Ref. 1267—A roadway surface.
    • Ref. 1269—An exterior rib-like structural support element providing a means to rigidly connecting together a truss, a track component, a side wall, ref. 1250, a roof element and a base element when included in a track-enclosure component. Said rib-like element is attached to the truss by means of a bracket, ref. 1261, attached to the truss and attached to the elements by similar means.

FIG. 13 illustrates two roadway surfaces, one above the other, within a single track-enclosure assemblage. The lower roadway surface, ref. 1301, provides four traffic lanes for bicycles or other small vehicles. The upper roadway surface, ref. 1303, provides a walkway for pedestrians and runners. The track-enclosure, ref. 1305, includes two levels of windows and an additional means to attach and support the upper roadway surface.

FIG. 14 illustrates a section of an enclosed and elevated roadway, supported by several structural support components positioned at discrete points along the roadway. Several different shapes, sizes and support methods are illustrated.

As can be seen in FIG. 14, the structural supports hold the roadway at a desired elevation and a desired disposition in relationship to the nearby terrain. The selection of structural support components from the set of available components is determined, in part, by the geographical characteristics of the nearby terrain and, in part, by the existing land use. Specifically, this illustration shows an existing street, ref. 1405, with an arch support straddling it, ref. 1415b, and a ravine with a suspension cable and towers, ref. 1409 and 1411, supporting a segment of the roadway spanning this ravine, ref. 1421c.

Furthermore, FIG. 14 indicates how the structural-support components and structural-support-base assemblies are positioned at discreet points along the roadway. Accordingly, a support method and an assemblage comprised of a structural-support component, connector(s) and supporting-structure-base(s) can be selected for each support point along the roadway so as to be compatible with, but not limited to, the geographical terrain characteristics and elevation and the existing and planned land use at the point.

Collectively, FIGS. 1, 2, 4, 9, 11 and 13 show a variety of components that constitute a sampling of members of the disclosed master-set of components which are designed in such a manner that combinations of these components can be selected and assembled to form a section of an enclosed, elevated roadway. FIG. 2 further illustrates this concept by showing two track components, three track-enclosure components, two arch support-structure-components, four support-structure-base components and an arch structure connector component in a partially-assembled configuration.

Also, FIGS. 1, 2, 11 and 14 collectively, show a variety of structural components and methods to support one or more modular sections of such a roadway at a particular elevation and orientation. And, these same drawings illustrate how such a roadway can be supported in a variety of positions and configurations, relative to the supporting structure.

As would be evident to one familiar with the field of structural design and construction techniques, the disclosed master-set of components contains a multitude of members; and said members can be categorized and further defined as:

Track Component Members:

Track components are members selected from the disclosed master-set of components; these form the riding surface of the roadways. Such track component members include a multitude of sizes, shapes and functionalities; a representative sampling of track components is illustrated in FIG. 8._And, in FIG. 4 and FIG. 9, the modular assembly of several track components to form a section of a roadway surface is illustrated.

Track components, however, are also designed and intended to be assembled together with other types of components selected from the master-set of components, these being barrier-wall components and track-enclosure components. Accordingly, the sizes and shapes of track components is coordinated with the sizes and shapes of these other components and provide for modular assembly with them.

It is also pointed out that each track component has a predetermined position and orientation in which it is intended to be disposed with respect to the nearby terrain and a horizontal plane, and the position and orientation in which it is intended to be mated with and attached to the suitably selected other components.

FIG. 7 and FIG. 9 illustrate, conceptually, this disposition of track components with respect to track-enclosure components.

One embodiment of such a track component is illustrated in FIG. 3. Such track components include a roadway surface, ref. 301, here partially cut away to expose a structural framework; and, a structural framework,-ref. 303, that strengthens the track section and supports, stiffens and holds the roadway surface in a relatively flat and smooth position.

Track components may also include, but are not required to include, surface markings that indicate lane boundaries, ref. 413, and turning arrows, but such markings are not limited to indicating only these items; and, they may include one or more guard rails or barriers intended to prevent users from falling-off the roadway surface or to control traffic-flow.

Another embodiment of a track component is a flexible roll of roadway surface material that could be laid onto or affixed to a rigid sub-floor-like platform.

Track components are designed and engineered in such a manner so as to be suitable for being joined together in a modular fashion to form a section of a roadway surface of any desired length, following any appropriate three dimensional trajectory, having a predetermined traffic-flow capacity at each point along the roadway and having the desired functionality at each point. Accordingly, there are a variety of widths, shapes and functionalities included in this group of components. FIG. 4 illustrates several track components connected together so as to provide a sampling of such functionalities.

Traffic-flow capacity is determined, in part, by the number of traffic lanes; this, in turn, is determined by the width of the roadway surface. Typically, the roadway surface will have a width being a multiple of a single lane width; it will provide for travel in both directions; the width will change at various locations along the roadway so as to accommodate estimated traffic-flow capacity requirements at these locations; the intended travel direction within a given lane may be altered during rush hours so as to provide increased capacity in the dominating direction of traffic-flow during these time periods.

The term ‘functionality’ is used herein to indicate that the roadway has, in addition to the normal traffic lanes used to travel along the roadway, provisions for additional functions such as passing lanes, turning lanes, merging lanes, rest stop areas, emergency pull-off lanes or areas, entrance and exit ramps and other functions. Accordingly, at each point along the roadway there may or may not be some of these additional functionalities; and, therefore, when designing or planning a modular section of the roadway that particular section may or may not include any additional functionality.

For rectangular track components there are a selection of lengths included in the disclosed master-set, this being the distance measured in the intended traffic direction. Each track component's length should be designed so as to be consistent with the modular assembly method and well as to be conveniently manufactured and transported to a roadway construction site. For straight track components a length between 12 feet and 96 feet would be acceptable.

The width of the roadway surface is, typically, dependent on the number of traffic lanes said surface is intended to accommodate. Each such traffic lane should be of adequate width to accommodate one or two people walking side by side or a bicycle and its rider or a rider of any other small-vehicle appropriate for use on said roadway. This width of a single lane would be, more-or-less, four feet wide; accordingly, a roadway surface accommodating four lanes would be, more-or-less, sixteen feet wide.

For curved, helical, wye and other shapes, the ‘length’ and ‘width’ are not obvious. Instead, the term ‘width’ as used herein is a vector, more completely described below, and has a direction and a value. Nonetheless, track components are inherently sized according to traffic-flow requirements and lane width.

Track components are modular and are intended to be connected together. FIG. 4 illustrates six track components connected together according to two methods. Also illustrated are two reference directions used herein when referring to track components.

The first is called the intended traffic direction and is indicated by arrows indicating a particular point on the roadway surface for which the intended traffic direction is defined; the arrow indicates the intended traffic direction at that point.

The second direction is called the ‘width direction’ and is also defined for each point on the roadway surface. The width is a vector and has both a value and a direction. The width direction, at a specific point is perpendicular to the intended traffic direction. The width value is the distance from one edge of the roadway surface to the opposing edge travelling in the direction perpendicular to the intended traffic direction at said point and passing through said point.

FIG. 4, ref. 417, represents the width value of the track component, ref. 401, this having a value of four lanes wide. Here, as is the case with all rectangular track components, this width is the same and constant for every point on the roadway surface. However, for non-rectangular track components, the curved track component, ref, 405, for example, the intended traffic direction and the direction of the width vector changes as one moves from one end to the other. In this particular case, the value of the width remains constant; it is four lanes wide. Other track components, ref. 409 as an example, have a width value that changes from four lanes wide to two lanes wide.

Also, when referring to track components there are 4 or more edges. Two edges, herein referred to as the ‘ends’ are the edges perpendicular to the intended traffic direction at a point on said edge. Two edges, herein referred to as the ‘sides’, are the edges intersected by the width vector. Some track components have more complex shapes and more than four edges; accordingly, when the terms ends and sides are used herein, they should generally be considered in the context of a simple shaped track section.

FIG. 3 and FIG. 4 illustrate the method and means of connecting track components side-by-side:

Shown as-ref. 401 is a straight track component which is four lanes wide and 48 feet long; and, as ref. 403, another straight track component, which is also four lanes wide and 12 feet long. These two track components can be connected side-by-side by means of bolts, passing through the structural strengthening elements beneath the roadway surface, here illustrated as ref. 305 in FIG. 3; however, bolts are not the only means of connecting track components side-by-side and should not be construed as the preferred method. By so connecting these track-sections together, a roadway surface eight lanes wide has been created.

FIG. 4 also illustrated a second method of connecting track components together; herein referred to as the end-to-end method:

Also illustrated in FIG. 4 are a horizontal turn track component with a 30 degree included turning angle and a turn radius of 18 feet, ref. 355; another straight track component, ref. 357, which is four lanes wide and 12 feet long; a transition track component smoothly merging four lanes into two lanes, ref. 409; and, another straight track component two lanes wide and 12 feet long, ref. 411. These five track components are connected together, end-to-end so as to form a contiguous length of roadway surface making a right turn. These five track components can be connected end-to-end by means of bolts passing through the structural strengthening elements beneath the roadway surface; however, bolts are not to only means of connecting track components end-to-end and should not be construed as the preferred method.

Connecting track components together by means of bolts or other readily removable fasteners provides a means to accomplish another objective; this being a method to facilitate future upgrades, configuration modifications and maintenance to the roadway. That is, by using fasteners that can be easily and non-destructively removed allows modular sections of the roadway to be removed and replaced by alternative shapes or functionalities as may be required or desired at some time in the future.

To connect two track components together according to the end-to-end method, each should have the same width. Otherwise, a transition track component should be inserted which offers a smooth transition between the two respective widths. Such a configuration is illustrated in FIG. 4 where the track component, ref. 409, affords such a transition.

Another alternative configuration of a track component is a combination of one or more lanes designated as bicycle and/or other small vehicle lanes and one or more lanes designated as pedestrian lanes for walking, running or using devices such as skates. Such combination configurations may include, but are not required to include, a separation barrier such as a railing or partition; said barrier being for the purpose of separating the different types of users.

One embodiment of the roadway surface is composed of conventional wood planks, such as the common construction lumber designated as a ‘2×6’. Another embodiment of the roadway surface is composed of sheets or rolls of a flexible material which is laid onto or applied to a structurally strong and rigid frame or platform. These, however, are only examples of suitable materials and one suitable size. As would be evident to one familiar with readily available construction materials, such a roadway surface could also be comprised of numerous other materials including, but not limited to, plywood, synthetic or composite decking materials, metallic mesh or wire fabric or rubber-like composites.

Regardless of the material used or the size or the shape, the roadway surface must be relatively flat and smooth and structurally strong enough to support users that are walking, running, riding bicycles or using other small vehicles.

An exception to the flat and smooth description of the roadway surface, however, is the optional use of a raised ridge or rumble-strip type of surface running along selected lane boundaries to provide a physical and/or audible warning to a user that the boundary is being crossed.

When laid onto a structural framework or platform, the roadway surface can be attached to the structural framework or platform by means of screws, bolts, adhesive or any of numerous alternative means of fastening; all of which are well known and evident to one knowledgeable in the art of construction.

A structural framework as illustrated in conforms to the size and shape of the particular track component. It may be constructed of steel or aluminum channel beams welded, riveted or bolted together, as illustrated, but could be equally well be constructed of other materials and/or in any of numerous alternative configurations as would be evident to one familiar with such fabrication techniques. Another embodiment of a structural framework is a platform comprised of a framework and a rigid sub-surface, plywood being one example, thereby providing a means to apply a flexible roadway surface.

The structural framework also provides connecting points, especially around its perimeter, that allow the track component to be securely fastened to other track components, to trusses which are typically included in barrier-walls and track-enclosure components, to track-enclosure components, to barrier-wall components and to roadway structural support assemblages.

FIG. 12 illustrates one such means of connecting a track component to a truss by using bolts. Also illustrated is one manner of attaching a track component to external rib-like structural elements included in a track-enclosure component. Here, the connection is between said structural framework, ref. 1265, to a connection element of the truss, ref. 1257, to a bracket attached to the truss, ref. 1261, which, in turn, is attached to the external rib-like structural element, ref. 1269. As illustrated, the bracket, ref. 1261, is welded to the truss and the rib-like structural element; however, as would be evident to one skilled in the art of structural construction, there are other suitable means for so connecting these elements together and welding should not be construed as the only or the preferred method.

The means of fastening the structural framework to any of these objects, and/or to other objects that may be applicable, can be screws, bolts, welding, brazing or any of numerous alternative means of fastening; all of which are well known and evident to one knowledgeable in the art of structural construction.

Another embodiment of the structural framework is the inclusion of side railings or barriers, one example of which is illustrated in FIG. 13; these being for the purpose of protecting users of the roadway surface from falling or unintentionally travelling off the surface as well as for traffic-control purposes.

Track component members included in the disclosed master-set of components include widths of, but not limited to only these widths, one through four lanes wide, with and without additional lanes to accommodate functions such as passing, turning, exit and entrance ramps, stopping, resting and emergency pull-offs.

Also included in said master-set are track components having shapes of, but not limited to these shapes:

Straight track components; these are intended to be connected together in the end-to-end method, in a modular fashion, to configure a roadway of any desired width and length.

Straight track components can also be connected together in the side-by-side method to form a wider roadway and combinations including a multitude of straight track components can be connected together to form a surface area of any length and width. This, for example, could configure a sizable surface area for a rest stop or other uses.

Also included are track components to provide for horizontal turns, as illustrated in FIG. 4, ref. 405. Such track components are included in various widths, in a selection of turning radii as well as in a selection of included-turn-angles, so as to allow the roadway to change direction at a preferred turning radius and to turn to a new preferred direction of travel.

Connecting a plurality of turning track components together in the end-to-end method will result in a combined included turn angle equal to the sum of the individual turning angles. Accordingly, three components having a 30 degree included angle, when connected together end-to-end such that all are turning in the same direction, will result in a 90 degree turn. Or, four of such components, when connected together in the end-to-end method such that the first two are turning right and the next two are turning left, will result in the roadway making a jog to the right then returning to the original direction of travel.

Turning track components, having compatible radii and included turn angles, can also be connected together in the side-by-side method to form a wider roadway surface.

Another shape of track components is a trapezoid. This shape is used to provide a smooth transition between a section of roadway having a given width and another section of roadway having a different width. For example, a transition track component would be used to connect a section of roadway four lanes wide with another section two lanes wide. FIG. 4, ref. 409 illustrates such a track component.

Also included are track components to provide assents and descents relative to horizontally orientated sections of a roadway. One use, but not the only use, of assents and descents is in configuring an entrance or exit ramp. Such track components are included in various lengths and various widths and in a variety of pitches, both up and down, so as to allow the roadway to change elevation at a preferred grade.

Also included are track components to provide for turn-offs, thereby allowing users to move from one roadway to another; intersections, thereby providing for two or more roadways to cross one-another in the same horizontal plane; wyes, thereby splitting the roadway into two roadways, such as could be employed to form a cul-de-sac like configuration; and helixes, which are track sections that turn both horizontally and vertically in a continuous, screw-like manner. A helix, when joined to a turn-off track section, could provide a configuration to allow a section of roadway to rise up or descend and, simultaneously, turn under or over the original roadway trajectory as commonly seen in ‘clover leaf’ intersections of conventional highways.

In addition to the above described track sections, the disclosed master-set of components includes a plurality of additional track component member configurations, widths and lengths as would be required to provide needed or desired functionality for an extensive network of roadways as might be configured to properly service a geographical region such as a municipality, campus or military base.

And in addition, numerous additional track component members comprising a multitude of additional sizes and shapes, alternative traffic-control markings, alternative materials and methods of assembly could readily be designed, engineered and manufactured; as would be evident to one skilled in the art of mechanical design and fabrication. And, any or all such additions can, and are expected to, be added to the disclosed master-set of components.

Barrier-Walls:

Barrier-walls are components selected from the disclosed master-set of components that are designed and intended to mate with and attach to suitable track components; and, when so connected together to provide a barrier suitable for directing traffic along the roadway surface and to add structural strength. Barrier-walls are provided in a multitude of shapes, sizes and configurations that are compatible with the sizes and shapes of the track components. Several representative sizes and shapes for barrier-walls are illustrated in FIG. 5.

For every size, shape and functionality of track component, there will be at least one barrier-wall size and shape with which it is compatible. Accordingly, by way of example, there are straight barrier-wall components that are compatible with straight track components. And, there are curved barrier-wall components that are compatible with horizontally turning track components. That is, they are also curved with radii equal to the outside radius of compatible track components; and, there are other barrier-walls that are curved with radii equal to the inside radius of the same track components.

Barrier-walls also have a means to be connected to other barrier-walls and to other suitable track-enclosure components in the end-to-end method.

Each barrier-wall component has a predetermined position and orientation in which it is intended to be disposed with respect to the nearby terrain and a horizontal plane, and the position and orientation in which it is intended to be mated with and attached to a suitable track component.

A barrier-wall component is comprised of a vertical element, such as a wall, and an elongated structural load-bearing element intended to span a predetermined distance between two or more points while supporting the design loadings. This predetermined distance is, in many cases, greater than the length of the barrier-wall component.

Herein such a load-bearing structural element, for the purpose of expediency and to simplify descriptions, will be referred to as a truss. A truss, this being typically defined as an elongated rigid framework, however is not the only suitable structure and should not be construed as the preferred structure.

The truss element is designed and engineered to have sufficient rigidity and strength so as to enable it to suitably support a section of an elevated roadway to which it is attached together with all the design loadings while being supported at its ends only. In addition, such a truss has a means to be connected together with other trusses in the end-to-end method. One such method is illustrated in FIG. 12, ref 1259; these being connecting plates bolted to the top and bottom cord of each of the adjoining trusses. When so connected together, each truss is rigidly attached to its adjoining trusses in a contiguous manner such that all such trusses attached together form a new, longer structural load-bearing element. This new, longer truss is herein referred to as a ‘main truss’.

Accordingly, as an example for the purpose of clarification, two barrier-walls truss elements and two track-enclosures truss elements, each being 12 foot long, may be attached together in the end-to-end method so as to form an assemblage 48 feet long. The four trusses would then form a new truss 48 feet long. And, each of the four trusses and the connecting means would be designed and engineered to have sufficient stiffness and strength to support the design loadings for a 48 foot long span of roadway.

The truss's orientation is such that it will run in the intended traffic direction of the roadway surface with which it is mated. One such embodiment is illustrated in FIG. 6. Here, the vertical element is represented as a wall composed of a rigid sheathing material on the inside and outside with the truss enclosed inside the wall; having all said elements attached together so as to form a rigid assemblage.

Barrier-walls have a means to be connected together, in the end-to-end method. When so connected, the truss elements are rigidly attached one to the other, so as to form a contiguous truss assembly and, in essence, form a new, longer truss from a structural properties and structural design perspective.

Accordingly, when one or more barrier-walls and a track component are assembled together in the intended position and orientation with respect to one another and the nearby terrain, the vertical element will provide a means for directing traffic-flow along the roadway surface and the truss element will provide suitable structural strength so that the assemblage can span a predetermined distance while being supported only at its ends.

Typically, barrier-walls are intended to be attached to or near the side edges of a track component such as is illustrated in FIG. 7. One means of making such a attachment is illustrated in FIG. 12; here illustrating bolts connecting the track component strengthening structure to the barrier-wall truss. However, barrier-walls can also be attached between the edges so as to, for example, separate different types of traffic or provide additional structural strength.

A barrier-wall's vertical element can also be composed of a fence or railing. And, in another embodiment, the vertical element could be considerably higher and include a transparent area or window.

Track-Enclosure Components:

Track-enclosure components are components selected from the disclosed master-set of components that are designed and intended to mate with and attach to suitable track components; and, when so connected together to provide a roof covering a portion of the roadway surface, one or more walls suitable for directing traffic along the roadway surface and a structural truss to add structural strength. Track-enclosure components are provided in a multitude of shapes, sizes and configurations that are compatible with the sizes and shapes of the track components.

For every size, shape and functionality of track component, there will be at least one track-enclosure component size and shape with which it is compatible. Accordingly, by way of example, there are straight track-enclosure components, such as illustrated in FIG. 2, ref 209a and 209b that are compatible with straight track components. And, there are curved track-enclosure components that are compatible with horizontally turning track components, such as illustrated in FIG. 2, ref 207.

Each track-enclosure component has a predetermined position and orientation in which it is intended to be disposed with respect to the nearby terrain and a horizontal plane, and the position and orientation in which it is intended to be mated with and attached to a suitable track component.

FIG. 2 illustrates, conceptually, this disposition of track components with respect to track-enclosure components.

One embodiment of such a track-enclosure component is illustrated in FIG. 1. Track-enclosure components may include, but not be limited to or required to include, one or two sidewalls, ref. 105; a truss or other strengthening element within the wall section, FIG. 6, ref. 605; a side window that may be fixed or opening and that may or may not be positioned on a diagonal, ref. 103; a window frame or beam; a base enclosure, ref. 107; and external stiffening ribs, ref. 101.

It should be pointed out that a track-enclosure component's side wall is functionally similar to a barrier-wall. One implication of this is that either a track-enclosure component or a barrier-wall will provide the truss and its structural properties as well as a vertical element to direct traffic-flow along the roadway surface. Accordingly, either type of component could be selected to configure a modular section of roadway. However, since the barrier-wall has no roof, it cannot enclose the roadway surface and, accordingly, it is intended to be used when the entire section of roadway will be enclosed by an externally provided roof. Such a situation may occur when, as an example, the section of roadway will be inside a mall or running down a city street that has been covered to form an arcade like area.

Accordingly, there are two means of enclosing the modular sections of track components disclosed herein: The first means is by mating and connecting the track components with matching track-enclosure components as illustrated in FIG. 1; another means is by assembling the sections of track components beneath an existing enclosure.

Other elements, which may be considered as optional elements of the track-enclosure components, include lightning rods and grounding wires, rain gutters and downspouts, window screening, skylights, solar panels, interior lighting, exterior lighting, vents and a variety of other optional elements as are disclosed elsewhere or as would be evident to one skilled in the art of elevated roadway design, construction or operation. Such other elements are also included in the disclosed master-set of components.

The track-enclosure components are designed and engineered in such a manner so as to be suitable for being joined together in a modular fashion so as to form an enclosure around roadway track components, such as is illustrated in FIG. 2. Accordingly, the size and shape of particular sections is dependent on and related to the size and shape of other track-enclosure components and also to the track components, which have been described above.

Other track-enclosure components are designed and engineered in such a manner so as to be suitable for being joined together in a modular fashion so as to form an enclosure around two or more roadway track components, such as one roadway surface above another roadway surface. Accordingly, the size and shape of such members is dependent on and related to the size and shape of other member track-enclosure components and also to the member track components being enclosed and the orientation of said track components, relative to each other.

In addition, the track-enclosure components are designed and engineered, in part, to protect the roadway surface and users of the roadway from rain; snow; other forms of precipitation; the wind; falling debris, such as leaves and branches; wildlife, particularly birds and insects; exterior smoke or fire or noxious fumes; lightning; acts of vandalism, such as objects being thrown; and, any other objects or substances that might interfere with the users or the intended activities.

The height of a track-enclosure component, that is, the distance between the peak of the roof and the roadway surface, when said component and a track component are connected together in the intended position and orientation, must be sufficient to enclose the roadway surface wile comfortable accommodating a pedestrian or a bicycle rider while walking or riding on the roadway surface. The distance between the roadway surface and the peak of the roof would be comparable to the ceiling height of a residence, say eight to ten feet. The distance between the roadway surface and the bottom of the base enclosure will, clearly, depend on the profile of the base enclosure but is expected to be about three feet. Accordingly, the height of a track-enclosure component, when such section is intended to only enclose a section of a track component, would be eleven to thirteen feet, more-or-less.

In another embodiment of the track-enclosure components, said sections are designed and engineered in such a manner so as to be suitable for being joined together in a modular fashion so as to form an enclosure around two or more roadway track components, such as is illustrated in FIG. 13. Said roadway track components can be in any orientation with-respect-to one another; one such embodiment is one roadway track component running parallel to and above another roadway track component. Such may be the case when, as an example, one roadway track component is intended for pedestrians and the other roadway track component is intended for bicycles and other small vehicles. In such as case, the height of a track-enclosure component, that is, the distance between the peak of the roof and the bottom of the base enclosure would have to accommodate two levels and would, accordingly, be considerable larger, perhaps 22 feet, more-or-less.

The width and shape of a representative track-enclosure component will, as stated above, be related to and dependent on the track component(s) it is intended to enclose. Typically the inside width will be such as to accommodate either one half or the entire width of the track component. That would be, more-or-less, four or eight feet for a two lane wide track component and, more-or-less, twelve or twenty-four feet for a six lane wide track component. The length and shape would, as well, be related to the length of the track component(s) it is intended to enclose. Typically this would be the same as or a simple fraction of the length of the track component. As an example, in the case of a straight track component, a length of 12 feet would accommodate a track component length of 12, 24, 36 or 48 feet long.

The disclosed set of components also includes track-enclosure components that serve multiple functions; for example, to enclose a section of the roadway track component adjacent to an entrance or exit ramp while, simultaneously, enclosing the ramp itself. In such cases, the track-enclosure components will have more complex shapes and may resemble a building structure, two or more stories in height and have an indeterminate width and length.

Nonetheless, for each configuration of track components there will be one or more assemblages of track-enclosure components that will match and properly fit together with and can be attached to said track component configuration. As an example of this concept, FIG. 2, ref. 203 illustrates a straight section of roadway surface and ref. 209a and 209b illustrate two, identical track-enclosure components that match and properly fit together with the track component. A total of eight of these track-enclosure components, four on each side of the track component, will enclose this track component.

Regarding the construction of a representative track-enclosure component, let us first consider the side wall(s) with or without a window. Said window could be a separately installed element or it could be simply a transparent area within the wall. One embodiment of such a side wall is comprised of a truss covered with a rigid sheathing material as illustrated in FIG. 12, ref 1250. The illustration shows such an arrangement where a portion of the sheathing and covering materials have been removed to expose a structural framework, ref. 1255, here illustrated as a truss only.

One embodiment of the track component's structural framework is the inclusion of one or more elongated structural load-bearing elements intended to span a predetermined distance between two or more points while supporting the design loadings. Said load-bearing elements run in the intended traffic direction of the track component; these being for the purpose of providing sufficient strength so as to allow the assemblage comprising the track component and one or more track-enclosure components to be supported at each end, only.

Herein such a load-bearing structural element, for the purpose of expediency and to simplify descriptions, will be referred to as a truss. A truss, this being typically defined as an elongated rigid framework, however is not the only suitable structure and should not be construed as the preferred structure.

The truss element is designed and engineered to have sufficient rigidity and strength so as to enable it to suitably support a section of an elevated roadway to which it is attached together with all the design loadings while being supported at its ends only. In addition, such a truss has a means to be connected together with other trusses in the end-to-end method. One such method is illustrated in FIG. 12, ref. 1259; these being connecting plates bolted to the top and bottom cord of each of the adjoining trusses. When so connected together, each truss is rigidly attached to its adjoining trusses in a contiguous manner such that all such trusses attached together form a new, longer structural load-bearing element. This new, longer truss is herein referred to as a ‘main truss’.

Accordingly, as an example for the purpose of clarification, two barrier-walls truss elements and two track-enclosures truss elements, each being 12 foot long, may be attached together in the end-to-end method so as to form an assemblage 48 feet long. The four trusses would then form a new truss 48 feet long. And, each of the four trusses and the connecting means would be designed and engineered to have sufficient stiffness and strength to support the design loadings for a 48 foot long span of roadway.

A profile section through the side wall could be more-or-less 5 feet high by 4 inches thick such that, when a window unit that is 3 feet high and a top window frame/beam of 1 foot in height is positioned on top of the wall(s), the combination would extent to a height of 9 feet. These dimensions, however, are only one approximation of a desirable wall and window height and should not be construed as being a preferred or optimum height since such dimensions will be determined to a large extent by the materials used, the nature of the interior structural framework, the preferred aesthetic appearance of the wall and, of course, whether the entire wall(s) contain a window.

As regards the length and shape of the wall, when suitable mated with a track component the side walls run in the intended traffic direction along the roadway surface. It would, as a general rule, follow the shape of the side edge of the roadway track component it is intended to enclose. That is to say, the shape of a wall designed to match with a straight section of roadway surface would be straight and the shape of a wall designed to match with a horizontally curved section of roadway surface would be curved. The length would, similarly, conform to the length of the track component or be a simple fraction of it, say one-half or one-fourth such that several track-enclosure components could be attached together in a contiguous and modular fashion in order to enclose the track component.

Finally, regarding the exterior surfaces of the wall, the materials used should be weatherproof and have a long life expectancy and/or be covered or coated with a suitable exterior material.

Track-enclosure components have a means to be connected together, in the end-to-end method. When so connected, the truss elements are rigidly attached one to the other, so as to form a contiguous truss assembly and, in essence, form a new, longer truss from a structural properties and structural design perspective.

Regarding the construction of the roof portion, FIG. 1, ref 111 illustrates one possible embodiment; this being an arch-like shape. This, however, is only one of many suitable shapes and should not be construed as the preferred or optimum shape. As is the case with other structures and coverings, the roof should shed rainwater and discourage the buildup of snow or other debris; so, pitched, peaked and other shapes would be appropriate. The materials used, in conjunction with its structural supports, must have adequate strength to support design loads, particularly snow and wind loads; the roof materials should be weatherproof and have a long life expectancy and/or be covered or coated with a suitable exterior roofing material. Acceptable materials would include, but not be limited to, sheet metal, plastics and plywood or composite materials as are commonly found in traditional roofing systems. Since the roofing system constitutes a component of an elevated roadway, its weight is particularly important; therefore, lightweight materials would be given preference and heavy roofing materials, slate or tile, for example, would not be appropriate.

Use of tensile fabric structure design and materials is another roof system.

In one embodiment, all or some of the roof sections are fitted with solar panels. In this manner, especially considering the large combined area available with an extensive network of roadways, solar energy can be converted into electrical power to benefit the community.

Regarding the construction of the base enclosure element, which is an optional element, FIG. 1, ref. 107 illustrates one possible embodiment; this being an arch-like shape. This, however, is only one of many suitable shapes and should not be construed as the preferred or optimum shape. The base enclosure serves to protect the roadway from beneath, encloses and affords protection to utility lines located beneath the roadway track component and any additional components that may be located here, such as utility wire conduit; and may provide an aesthetic or general design benefit. The materials used should, preferably, be fire retardant since there is likelihood of exterior fires and of sufficient strength to resist punctures. Acceptable materials would include, but not be limited to, sheet metal or composite materials.

FIG. 1, ref. 101 illustrates a series of external structural rib-like supports. The materials used, the size and shape of the supports and the spacing between supports are designed and engineered to be compatible with and afford adequate strength to the entire track-enclosure component assemblage. Such structural support elements are rigidly attached to and connect the roof, the side wall(s) and the base enclosure together.

Illustrated in FIG. 12 is one manner of attaching a track component to external rib-like structural elements included in a track-enclosure component. Here, the connection is between said structural framework, ref. 1265, to a connection element of the truss, ref. 1257, to a bracket attached to the truss, ref. 1261, which, in turn, is attached to the external rib-like structural element, ref. 1269. As illustrated, the bracket, ref. 1161, is welded to the truss and the rib-like structural element; however, as would be evident to one skilled in the art of structural construction, there are other suitable means for so connecting these elements together and welding should not be construed as the only or the preferred method.

Although FIG. 12, ref. 1269 illustrates the structural ribs as being external; they could also be internal. This arrangement, however, would present the possibility of injury to the users of the roadway and may complicate the cleaning and maintenance of the interior of the roadway. Also, as illustrated, these supports are shaped to conform to the exterior profile of the track-enclosure component cross section. This specific shape is not critical; however, since they afford structural support, especially to the roof and base enclosure elements, a shape close to this profile would seem beneficial.

These could be steel or aluminum bars or some other extruded or rolled shapes such as round or rectangular tubes.

Track-enclosure components included in the master-set of disclosed components, includes members for enclosing stretches of straight track components in all the available track widths and lengths; members for enclosing horizontal turning stretches of track components of all the available track widths, lengths, turning radii and included angles; members for enclosing all vertical rising and descending track components as well as members for enclosing all other track components as mentioned above and as may be appended to the master-set from time to time.

And in addition, as would be evident to one skilled in the art of mechanical design and fabrication, numerous additional track-enclosure component members comprising a multitude of additional sizes and shapes; alternative window types, sizes and locations; alternative structural framework design; alternative truss sizes, shapes and designs; alternative materials; and, alternative methods of assembly could readily be designed, engineered and manufactured. And, any or all such additions can, and are expected to, be added to the disclosed master-set of components.

An assemblage of a track component and one or more appropriate track-enclosure components, when said components are suitable for being so joined together, is, herein, referred to as a modular section of roadway. And said track-enclosure components include one or more truss elements designed and engineered to provide sufficient strength and stiffness so that the resulting modular section of roadway will be suitable to span a certain design distance between supports while being subjected to the appropriate design loadings. Accordingly, a roadway of any length and shape comprised of a plurality of such modular sections of roadway will be suitably supported when there is at least one structural support assemblage is affixed to each modular section of roadway along the length of the roadway.

Structural Support Assemblages:

A structural support assemblage holds a section of an enclosed and elevated roadway at a desired elevation and in a desired orientation. FIGS. 1, 2, 10 and 11 illustrate selected support methods, structural-support components and how these are incorporated into support assemblages. These assemblages typically include, but do not have to always include all of these components:

    • 1. A structural-support component. The disclosed set of structural-support components includes, but is not limited to, arches, A-frames, columns, cables and beams; selected ones of which are illustrated in FIG. 10.
      • Each component of this group has been designed and engineered to have sufficient strength and be of suitable size and shape to support one or more modular sections of roadway. This set or group of components includes members comprising a multitude of shapes and sizes; and, selected members implement a particular support method. Support methods include, but are not limited to; suspending a section of roadway beneath the structural-support component; resting a section of roadway on the structural-support component; and, attaching the section of roadway to a side of the structural-support component.
      • Another method of supporting a section of roadway uses a column or pole, which may be an existing object such as a utility pole; where said column or pole passes through the section of roadway or where the roadway is attached to a side of the column or pole.
      • Two or more modular sections of roadway may be supported by a single structural-support component and two or more structural-support components may be used to support a section of roadway.
    • 2. Connectors. The structural connector is affixed to a section of roadway and, simultaneously, connected to a structural-support component; and, thus becomes an interface between this section of roadway and said structural-support component. As such, the connector provides a means for supporting the roadway section at a desired elevation and a desired orientation relative to the structural-support component.
      • Typically said connectors are adjustable so as to allow the two objects to be separated by an arbitrary distance and orientated at an arbitrary angle with respect to one another; said distance and angle being, however, within the range of adjustment of the connector.
      • This set of connectors contains a sufficient quantity of members and range of shapes and sizes so that there will be a connector that can be selected that is compatible with and suitable for connecting a modular section of roadway to any of the structural-support components and implement any of the support methods.
    • 3. Braces. The structural braces include, but are not limited to, cross bracing elements connecting two or more structural-support components and are intended to strengthen and stiffen the resulting assemblage. Similar bracing methods are well known in sets of scaffolding components such as those used to erect scaffolding systems.
      • In addition, the structural braces include bracing elements connecting one or more structural supporting elements to a stable platform such as the earth or other structure. Such bracing elements include, but are not limited to, rigid arms, braces or cables connecting a structural supporting element to the ground or other structure so as to prevent it from tipping, rotating, sliding or otherwise moving with respect to the terrain.
      • This set of braces contains a sufficient quantity of members and range of shapes and sizes so that there will be a bracing member that can be selected that is compatible with and suitable for any of the structural-support components and implement any of the bracing methods.
    • 4. Structural-support-bases. The structural-support components typically are supported by combinations of adjustable structural-support-bases. This, however, does not mean and should not be construed to imply that the structural-support components must be or always are supported by a base. A structural-support components could, by itself, rest on or be attached to a stable platform such as the soil, terrain or another structure.
      • To accommodate variations in elevation of the terrain or stable platform, a preferred embodiment of selected structural-support-bases provides a means to adjust their height and, accordingly, adjust the height of that portion of the structural-support component to which it is attached. Similar adjustable, structural support configurations are commonly used in general construction, for example to adjust the height of and support floors, and are well known.
      • In addition, as one embodiment of the adjustable structural-support-base, is the disclosure of a shear-pin arrangement, or another, alternative break-away type connection, at the junction between the structural-support component and the structural-support-base. The purpose of said shear-pin or alternative connection is to prevent the structural-support component and the section of roadway to which it is affixed by means of a connector from being forcibly and rapidly damaged or shifted in the event of a catastrophic blow to the support base.
      • As an example, such could be the case in the event of a motor vehicle striking the structural-support-base. Should this occur, the design and engineering of the shear-pin or shear-ring arrangement would allow the shear element to fracture so as to allow the adjustable support base to bend or be dislodged without transferring a significant percentage of the shear forces and energy to the roadway through the support structure. Furthermore, in this embodiment, the superstructure of the nearby roadway; that is, the structural-support component that had been resting on the base, the adjacent structural-support components, all other nearby structural-support-bases, the nearby roadway track component structural framework, the track-enclosure components and external supporting ribs all taken together as an interconnected structural entity; has been designed and engineered to remain in position and have suitable strength and stiffness so as to be able to continue to function properly despite the loss of the displaced adjustable support base.

And so; with an adequate number of sizes, shapes and functionalities included in the set of available structural components; one familiar with the field of structural design and construction will be able to select a support or suspension method and a group of components and configure a structural support assemblage; consisting of a structural-support component, one or more connectors and with or without one or more structural-support-bases so as to satisfy the roadway elevation and orientation requirements; that is compatible with and suitable for the existing terrain conditions, existing nearby structures and land use at each point along the roadway. And, by so doing, the entire roadway can be constructed and held at the desired elevation and orientation at each of its discreet support points.

And in addition, numerous additional structural-support components, connectors, braces and structural-support-bases; comprising a multitude of additional support methods; additional sizes and shapes; alternative materials; and, alternative methods of assembly could readily be designed, engineered and manufactured; as would be evident to one skilled in the art of mechanical design and fabrication. And, any or all such additions can, and are expected to, be added to the disclosed set of components.

Lighting, Ventilation, Other Utility Service, Optional and Accessory Component Members:

The enclosed, elevated roadway, as described above, may benefit by the availability of additional functionality such as, but not limited to, provisions for interior and exterior lighting, ventilation, electrical and water supplies, misting stations for cooling and refreshing users, radiant heating units to warm users, signage, communication and control systems and entertainment services. Accordingly, a variety of components designed to provide such functions is included in the disclosed master-set of components.

Furthermore, there are other functions which may not directly benefit the enclosed, elevated roadway, but would enable it to provide for additional services so as to benefit the community within which or near to which the roadway passes. Such functions include, but are not limited to, utility wire conduits mounted under the riding surface and inside the base section so as to enable telephone and electric wires to be concealed and allow for the removal of unsightly utility poles, solar panels mounted on the roof to generate electricity, exterior lighting to provide for nearby street lighting, mountings for exterior traffic signage and traffic control signals and grow-lights underneath the roadway to promote and encourage plant growth. Accordingly, a variety of components designed to provide such functions is also included in the disclosed master-set of components.

Whereas the primary intended uses of the disclosed enclosed, elevated roadway are to provide a transportation system for bicycles and other small vehicles and for pedestrians and to provide recreational facilities, such a system can also serve as an emergency alternative transportation network in the event of traditional, existing transportation systems becoming inoperative.

And in addition, numerous additional functions and accessories which may benefit the design, fabrication, construction, operation, maintenance of such an enclosed, elevated roadway will be evident to one skilled in the art of design, fabrication construction and operation of elevated roadways. And, components that provide any or all such additional functions and accessories can, and are expected to, be added to the disclosed master-set of components.

In conclusion, based on the descriptions and information provided, it will be evident to one familiar with the art of elevated roadway design and construction that the disclosed master-set of pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured components is designed and engineered in such a manner and includes members having a sufficient variety of designs and functionalities and a sufficient range of physical properties and an inexhaustible supply of replicates, such that member components will exist and can be selected that can be assembled to form a modular section of an enclosed and elevated roadway. And, that such a modular section can be readily mated and matched with and connected to other modular sections of roadway so as to form a continuous roadway of a desired shape and length and include desired functionalities at each point along the roadway.

And, that each modular section of said roadway will be compatible with, but not limited to; the geographical terrain at its location along the roadway; the pre-existing and planned land use at said location; the desired three-dimensional direction of travel for the roadway at said location; the desired traffic-flow capacity at said location; and, the desired roadway functionality at said location. And, that said master-set of components includes such additional components as may be necessary or desired to improve the function of the roadway, to benefit the users of the roadway and/or to benefit a community near to or through which the roadway passes and/or to provide other valuable functions.

As Relates to a Roadway Designer's Manual:

Another aspect of this invention is a process providing a means for a planner or designer to readily and intuitively consider and select components to configure an appropriate modular section of roadway document. Said process results in a document, hereinafter referred to as a ‘Roadway Designer's Manual’, that presents the disclosed component members in a structured and organized manner. One embodiment of such a document is a printed manual and another is a digitized database.

This document is, in essence, a product catalog and design manual that presents the master-set of components in a manner such that a planner or designer could readily and intuitively consider and select components to configure an appropriate modular section of roadway. Included in said compilation is information about each component member, but not limited to just this information: its size, shape and other relevant physical properties; detailed descriptions of its intended use and functionality it can provide; other components with which it is compatible and can be mated; available options and variations; cost data so as to allow costing estimates to be calculated; and, engineering data and other information so as to provide an effective means for a designer to select appropriate components that can be readily and effectively assembled into a modular roadway section of a desired size, shape and having the desired functionalities.

As Relates to a Roadway Computer Assisted Design (CAD) Software Database:

Another aspect of this invention is a process providing a means for a planner or designer to readily and intuitively consider and select components to configure an appropriate modular section of roadway while using a CAD system. Said means is hereinafter referred to as a ‘Roadway Computer Assisted Design (CAD) Software Database’. This being a database containing records for each of the disclosed component members in a structured and organized manner; and, containing the shape, size, materials and other physical properties or each component and data used by compatible CAD software to properly extract, display and utilize the database records. And, a CAD software program that is capable of accessing this database such that a roadway designer can select components and, as typically done by users of such computer software, arrange and combine components into assemblages. And, with such a CAD system, be able to combine such assemblages into sections of roadway and to display and plot such displays so as to render drawings of the roadway designs.

As Relates to Networks of Roadways:

Another aspect of this invention is a network of enclosed and elevated roadways. By assembling a multitude of modular sections of roadway, each comprising components of the disclosed master-set of components, said modules can be joined together into a roadway system having a desired shape and length. Then, by combining a plurality of such roadway systems and other related facilities a network of enclosed, elevated roadways can be created that has four intended functions, but is not limited to providing only these functions nor required to provide all these functions:

    • To provide a convenient, reliable and safe means for any qualified person to be able to readily and easily access the network from any point in a region and travel to and exit the network at the same or any other point within the region while travelling by foot, bicycle or any other suitable, small-vehicle.
    • To provide a convenient, safe and pleasant recreational facility that allows and encourages people to walk, roller-blade, ride bicycles or use any other suitable small-vehicle for the purpose of exercise, pleasure or recreation.
    • To incorporate means to provide other valuable functions for the benefit of the community at large.
    • To provide an alternative, effective and realistic emergency transportation system. In the event of an emergency it would be possible that its existence could well-serve the community by providing critical functions. These would be to allow citizens to vacate dangerous areas and allow emergency workers to move about the region. Consider that: it is not dependent on power from the electrical grid system supplying most cities, so it would not cease to function in the event of a blackout. It does not have ‘drivers’ or ‘conductors’ and could be operated independently from other public transportation systems and, so, may not be effected by strikes or work stoppages. It is separate and independent from the existing roadway networks serving motor vehicles and rail systems, so it would not be affected by normal traffic congestion or railway stoppage. Since it users are on foot or riding bicycles, to a large extent, it would be relatively immune to internal traffic congestion so as to stop its traffic flow. That is to say, a bicycle rider can, and customarily does, pick up his bike and carry it over or around obstacles. Furthermore, any breakdowns could be easily moved out of traffic lanes by a single person, with no ‘tow-truck’ needed.

Said network would, in most cases, include several roadways and roadway intersections and a plurality of entrance and exit points so as to allow users, travelling by foot, bicycle or any other suitable small-vehicle, to enter and exit the networks and to move freely about from one roadway to others and from points within the region served by the network to other points within the region. In addition to these roadways, intersections, entrances and exits, the network may, and typically does, incorporate additional and related functional components positioned within or nearby the roadways to provide additional functionality and/or increase user benefits of the network. Such additional components include, but would not be limited to, rest stops; toilet facilities; clothes changing facilities; motor vehicle parking facilities; bicycle parking facilities; food concessions; area and decorative lighting; HVAC systems; user and property security systems; user information and entertainment systems.

And, the network may include more than a single roadway at any point. These additional roadways may be for the purpose of increasing traffic-flow capacity or designed specifically for or designated for an alternative usage profile; examples being, for pedestrians only, for highly skilled bicycle riders, for commercial users or for higher speed motorized vehicles. Such additional, segregated roadways may run side-by-side, above, below or in any other positions relative to each other; or, they may be conjoined at various locations and share a common enclosure. Furthermore two or more roadways may share common support structures.

And accordingly, the disclosed master-set of components includes track components and track-enclosure components and alternative support structure hardware to accommodate multi-use roadway sections, one example of which is a two lane pedestrian walkway running above or alongside of, and segregated from, a second roadway intended to serve bicycles and other small vehicles.

As Relates to Multiple Networks:

Another embodiment of this invention is a plurality of interconnected networks such as a network within a military base interconnected with networks serving nearby municipalities which can be, in turn, interconnected with privately owned roadway branches leading to their parking facilities, this being only one example of interconnection of networks of such roadways.

As Relates to a Sports Training Track:

Another embodiment of this invention is a special-purpose enclosed, elevated roadway intended for sports, physical training and/or recreation use. Such a roadway may take the form of an ellipse, circle or other ‘endless’ trajectory, thus having similarities to a conventional sports or training track. Or, such a roadway may take the form of a helix or any other complex, three-dimensional trajectory, typically with a path returning the starting point.

As a Planning Process:

As already disclosed, one embodiment of this invention is an assemblage of the disclosed components into a network of enclosed, elevated roadways suitable for bicycles, other small vehicles and pedestrians. For persons skilled in the fields of structural design and construction and traffic engineering, it is evident that the very existence of the disclosed master-set of components may enable new and novel and improved methods to plan, design, engineer, configure, assemble, construct, implement, operate, maintain and incorporate future upgrades into such networks.

An additional embodiment of this invention, then, is a planning process for designing the routing and configuring the desired functionalities for a network of enclosed, elevated roadways. This disclosed process enables such planning to be done in less time, at a lower cost, with less risk of oversights and while being subjected to a lesser potential penalty in the event of errors and omissions then would be expected if such planning were done without the availability of such a master-set of components and the disclosed methods and process.

As stated, the process now being disclosed relates to planning the routing and functionalities for a network of roadways within a geographical region. Examples of such a geographical region would include, but not be limited to, countries, states, counties, municipalities, towns, cities, university campuses, military bases and industrial or recreational areas. However, in order to simplify the description and enable the reader to more easily visualize the methods and process, the term “city” will be used to describe such a region. It should be kept in mind, however, that the term “city”, as used here, could also mean any of the other examples or any geographical or political region.

The steps constituting the planning process are as follows:

  • 1. Assemble Maps and related information. As would be the case with any similar route-planning task, one begins with detailed maps and related information regarding the region. Such maps would include information relating to and locations of all existing roadways, railways, rivers, parks, trails, walkways, utility rights-of-way, existing structures, restricted or hazardous zones, significant government or privately owned areas within the region and various other relevant data typically indicated on maps.
    • In addition, it would be desirable to have zoning and regional planning maps that indicate current and future planned land uses at each point within the region.
    • Also, so that the planning can incorporate as many resident's individual and special needs as practical, one should have census and other data regarding the numbers of special-use and other types of vehicles currently being used throughout the region and/or vehicles that may be desired by or useful to residents who might be served by the network. Such special-use and other types of vehicles would include, but not be limited to; wheelchairs, particularly those capable of operation at higher, more compatible speeds, motorized scooters, Segways® and other such vehicles.
    • In addition, for the purpose of calculating expected traffic flows at each point along the planned routes, one should have population density data maps, demographic data, existing motor-vehicle traffic-flow data and existing pedestrian and bicycle traffic data for each point within the region.
    • And, in addition, one should have topographical maps indicating existing terrain and elevations at each point throughout the region.
    • And, one should have climate and weather-related information as well as information regarding any significant potential environmental hazards that may exist or be anticipated at each point within the region.
  • 2. Define distinct neighborhoods within the region (city). A typical city is clearly not homogeneous. Accordingly, the next step in this process is to subdivide the city into distinct neighborhoods; that is, to subdivide the city into smaller sub-regions with the realization and expectation that different sub-regions will have different requirements and preferences as relates to the roadways passing through or near to it. FIG. 15 illustrates a map of a hypothetical city for which roadway routing is to be planned.
  • 3. Eliminate any non-applicable neighborhoods. Possibly, some of neighborhoods or sub-regions within the city would not require or desire to be connected to the network of roadways. These may include, as examples only, vacant areas, industrial areas, privately owned areas or areas having extreme geographical restrictions, such as an island.
  • 4. Routing schematic—connect all neighborhoods. FIG. 15 illustrates a hypothetical city for which roadway routing and functionality is being planned. The black circles, ref. A, E, L, F, O, represent, schematically, entrance/exit points for each neighborhood and the straight black lines a section of the roadway network. The cross-hatched area around Ref. S represents a central business district for the city.
    • Based on demographic and existing traffic-flow data, as has been assembled in step 1, a person skilled in the art of traffic engineering and demographic analysis would now be able to estimate traffic-flow for the roadway being planned along each of the schematically illustrated roadway sections. For purposes of explanation only, let us consider a route that originates at point A, then continues through points E, F and O and terminates at point S, which, in this hypothetical city, is in the central business district.
    • It may be reasonable, and for purposes of this example let us assume this is the case, that one could make the following assumptions:
      • Point S, being near the heart of the central business district, is a primary destination for a majority of morning commuters. Conversely, during the evening rush hours the situation would be reversed.
      • There would be more traffic during the ‘rush hours’, than during non-rush hours, evenings, night time, weekends or holidays.
      • And so, the traffic-flow capacity of various sections of the roadway network could be planned based on ‘rush hours’ and there would likely be sufficient capacity to handle non-rush hour traffic as well.
      • A section of roadway will have a certain number of traffic lanes; let us say, for example, a section has four traffic lanes. These four lanes could be designated as three lanes heading ‘into the city’ and one lane heading ‘out of the city’ during morning rush hours and visa-versa during the evening rush hours.
      • The entrances at points A, E, F, L and O each have morning commuters entering the roadway network and the number of people entering at each respective point would be a function of the population and/or population density within each of the respective regions.
      • The exits at each of these points would have some, but a smaller number of, commuters leaving the roadway network, since we are considering the morning rush hour time-period.
      • Points—F and O would each have, respectively, an increasing number of commuters passing through as there would be more commuters entering than exiting. That is, whereas point E would only have commuters from point A passing by on their way to the central business district; point O would have commuters from points A, E, F and L passing through.
      • The exit at point S would be the busiest exit, since commuters exit here and disperse into the central business district during the morning rush hours.
      • Accordingly, the section of roadway between points A and E could be small—perhaps only two traffic lanes may be required. However, the section of roadway between points O and S should be the largest—perhaps six traffic lanes would be required.
    • And so, in this example of a hypothetical city and the schematic route map as shown in FIG. 15, a planner, who should be a person skilled in the art of traffic-flow and demographic analysis, may be able to estimate the size of roadways required, i.e. the width or the number of traffic lanes, for each roadway section and the capacity of each entrance and exit along the roadway.
    • Then, after further study of these interim results and after further analysis of the maps and information gathered as per step 1, above, said planner may be able to make additional refinements and improvements by further sub-division of selected neighborhood regions. That is to say, any of the neighborhood regions may benefit by having additional roadway branches spreading out within the neighborhood and, as would follow, by having additional entrance and exit points.
    • Finally, one benefit of the roadway network is to provide an alternative emergency transportation system. Accordingly, emergency scenarios such as electrical grid blackouts that disrupt rail transportation system and traffic signals, thereby causing traffic congestion; major disruption to motor-vehicle traffic due to widespread panic due to acts of terrorism or natural disasters; or physical damage to the infra-structure should be considered and whether they suggest additions or changes in routing.

The above steps, step 1 through step 4, are well known in prior art of route planning and traffic-flow analysis for transportation systems and are not claimed to be influenced by the existence of the disclosed master-set of components or to apply uniquely to an enclosed, elevated roadway; and so, they do not constitute any obvious new, novel or improved methods or process to plan the routing or functionality of such a network.

  • 5. Translate the schematic routing map into actual route and function specifications. Referring to FIG. 15 and the results obtained in step 4, above, the planner must now translate the schematically illustrated roadway sections into actual detailed specifications, artistic renderings, time and cost estimates and compilations of other supporting data such as would, typically, be required prior to making actual funding requests or moving on to the construction planning phase of the roadway network implementation.
    • Additionally, it would be reasonable, and one embodiment of this process is, to break the schematic routing diagram FIG. 15 into route sections. One purpose of this is to make the task more manageable and a second purpose is to simplify the description of the process here. Therefore, let us consider developing the actual detailed specifications and other planning objectives for just one section of the routing diagram; say the section of roadway between points E and F in FIG. 15.
    • First, let us consider the situation the planner would be facing prior to this disclosure of new, novel and improved methods and process for planning the routing of an enclosed, elevated roadway for bicycles, other small vehicles and pedestrians.
    • Utilizing prior art, the planner would, at this point, be starting with a proverbial ‘blank sheet of paper’. Based on the wealth of literature concerning “Mass Transit”, “Transportation Systems”, “Personal Rapid Transit”, “Automated People Movers” as well as less well publicized concepts such as the Senior U.S. Pat. No. 5,558,023, “Enclosed transportation system for rider propelled vehicles with pneumatic propulsion assistance”; the planner would be confronted with numerous possibilities ranging from a subway-like system to monorail technology to moving beltways to elevated roadway-like structures, either enclosed or open to the elements.
    • Again, referring to prior art, since no extensive enclosed, elevated roadway exists that is intended to serve bicycles, other small vehicles and pedestrians, the planner would have no technically sound basis for selecting any specific design concept. Furthermore, there would be no basis for estimating design and construction time nor costs.
    • Once again, referring to prior art, most elevated-roadway-like concepts that have been disclosed comprise concrete or other relatively heavy roadway surfaces and are supported by massive steel or concrete columns. Such a concept would, undoubtedly, require considerable design and engineering effort to be expended, be very disruptive to the neighborhood during its construction phase, be quite costly and, since it would not have the benefit of being ‘tried-and-proven technology’, it would be subject to unknown risks and outcomes.
    • One design concept, however, has been disclosed that is based on a lightweight, enclosed, elevated roadway suitable for bicycles. Specifically, U.S. Pat. No. 3,859,682; May 2, 1973; “Tubular Transportation Element” by Jan Sulkiewicz. This patent discloses a tubular transportation element comprising a tube having at least one wall of plastic in one continuous piece, at least one deck member for vehicular traffic. It also discloses the tube as being designed to span a distance while being supported at its ends.
    • Whereas this design concept might appear to be less costly and less intrusive during construction, it is no more than a general, overall design concept. Attempting to use such a concept would also require considerable design and engineering effort to be expended prior to being considered a viable option and, since it would not have the benefit of being ‘tried-and-proven technology’, would be subject to unknown risks and outcomes. Furthermore, there is no disclosure of how this design concept should incorporate any of the necessary functionality such as branch-offs, intersections, passing lanes, rest stops, emergency exits, entrances or exits.
    • Accordingly, as regards this step 5 in the routing and functionality planning process, —that is, translating the schematically illustrated roadway sections into actual detailed design specifications, artistic renderings, time and cost estimates and compilations of other supporting data as would, typically, be required prior to submitting such plans for funding requests or moving on to actual construction planning of the roadway network—there are no specific, detailed information or data or methods or processes that have been found in prior art.
    • However, given the disclosed master-set of pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured components, the planner's task is greatly simplified and intuitively obvious. This master-set of component members, as has been disclosed and described above, consists of track components, track-enclosure components, roadway support structure components and support methods and various optional and accessory components. Furthermore, these components have been designed so as to be readily selected, configured and assembled into modular roadway sections. And, in addition, these components have been organized and cataloged in a document, described above and referred to as the ‘Roadway Designer's Manual’.
    • And so, the planner would, while referring to the ‘Roadway Designer's Manual’ and/or making use of the ‘Roadway Computer Assisted Design Software Database’, select appropriate components so as to configure modular sections of roadway that would then be mated and connected together so as to form a roadway of the desired shape, length, capacity and function at each point along the roadway.
    • As would be evident to someone skilled in the art of mechanical systems design, such as someone skilled in the process of designing heating, ventilating and air-condition systems or water supply systems, this step 5 of the disclosed process for designing an enclosed, elevated roadway network bears many similarities to these well-know processes. In each case there is a master-set of pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured components that are available; and, in each case there is reference literature, specifically designer's manuals or handbooks, which present the available components in an organized manner together with technical data and information necessary to select and assemble the components into a system comprised of such components.
  • 6. Select the preferred configurations and refine the routing. As would be evident to someone skilled in the art of enclosed, elevated roadway design and construction and in traffic-flow planning, the results obtained in step 5 could be expected, at least in some cases, to provide several alternative configurations that meet the requirements as schematically specified in step 4.
    • And so, if the planner had no additional information, or no other basis to choose one configuration over another, any of the suitable configurations could be selected and chosen as the preferred configuration for each section of roadway.
    • Accordingly, the planner and the final selected design of the roadway section would benefit if there existed a set of ‘design objectives’ and a definable and measurable basis for comparing and evaluating and rating various alternative configurations, with respect to one another, so as to be able to choose the best or preferred configuration with more confidence.
    • With this goal in mind; that is to establish a set of ‘design objectives’ and a definable and measurable basis for comparing and evaluating and rating various alternative configurations for a section of roadway, with respect to one another; let us consider certain beneficial properties have been pre-designed and pre-engineered into the disclosed master-set of components and the assemblages formed from them. These properties are summarized in Table 2.
    • Two of the beneficial properties are:
    • 1. To be environmentally friendly.
    • 2. To secure public support, minimize implementation times and minimize costs.
    • Clearly, such benefits exist and are available to the planner because the disclosed master-set of components exists and these benefits have been pre-designed and pre-engineered into them. And so, for the next step in this process, the planner will proceed in such a manner as to take advantage of, and to capitalize on, these benefits.

TABLE 2 Design and Engineering Objectives which influenced the design, shape, size and function of the components Functional The resulting network must operate smoothly, safely, reliably and properly. That is, it must meet the intended functions of allowing people to move about the city with ease, comfort and safety; it must provide a convenient, safe and pleasant recreational facility; and, it should offer other valuable benefits to the city. Meet needs In addition, the network should offer additional functions to provide convenience for the users and make the network user friendly. Environmentally Another objective is to construct and operate the network while Friendly having a minimum impact on the land, plant life, wildlife, water flow, roadways, structures and existing or planned use of the areas beneath and nearby the network's roadways and other facilities; and, incorporate other ‘environmentally friendly’ features. Secure public Minimize time delays include the planning, design, engineering, support, manufacturing and construction time. Costs include planning, design minimize and engineering efforts, land acquisition costs, site preparation implementation costs, manufacturing and materials costs and construction costs and times and the cost allocated to risks and uncertainties. minimize costs
    • 1. Environmentally friendly. The enclosed, elevated roadway is intended to be and is designed and engineered to be environmentally friendly to the neighborhoods through which it passes or passes near to. Specifically, it can be constructed and operated while having a minimum impact on the land, plant life, wildlife, water flow, roadways, structures and existing or planned use of the areas beneath and nearby the network's roadways and other facilities and it offers additional environmentally friendly features as described here:
      • First, as illustrated in FIG. 14, because the enclosed roadway is elevated, typically above ground, its impact; on the land, plant life, wildlife, water flow, roadways, structures and existing or planned use of the areas beneath and nearby; is limited to the impact of its supporting structures and, to some extent, its blocking of sunlight due to its shadows and its interference with rainfall.
      • Second, because the roadway sections are structurally strong and lightweight, the number of and size of the supporting structures is quite small, especially compared to the relatively massive and obtrusive steel or concrete columns as typically seen with such elevated roadways. This can be seen in the illustrations in FIGS. 1, 2, 10, 11 and 14 when considered collectively.
      • Third, because there is a plurality of structural support component designs shapes and sizes with which to configure the support assemblage, the best or preferred configuration can be selected for each specific point along the roadway. Considering the variety of structural support options available, some of which are illustrated, collectively in FIGS. 1, 2, 10, 11 and 14, it becomes clear that an arch-like support structure may be best at one point, whereas an alternative support method may offer more benefits at another point.
      • Fourth, because the roadway track component and enclosure components are available in many shapes, sizes and configurations and because the roadway trajectory or path is flexible and intended to be planned within the three-dimensional space at the point being designed, not just in two directions as with conventional roads or trails, the planner has great flexibility to turn the roadway right, left, up or down or even move in a helical direction at any point.
      • Fifth, as is illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, one embodiment of support structure is an arch or horizontal truss design. Such a design, especially when appropriate cross-bracing is incorporated, has minimal or virtually no footings required. That is to say, a system comprised of multiple arches attached to the structurally strong and stiff roadway will not have a tendency to ‘tip-over’ or topple as is the case with a single column or post support. In addition, because of the light weight of the entire structure, and the fact that the bicycles and other small vehicles using the roadway are, themselves, quite light, the weight or load on each arch base support is relatively small. Thus, depending of soil and surface conditions, it may not be necessary to dig into the ground or pour concrete footers or foundations. Also adjustable arch bases include designs with two feet (or more) on each leg which further reduces the need for obtrusive and costly support footings.
      • Sixth, the design of the roadway enclosures incorporate rain gutters and downspouts so rainwater collected from the roof can be discharged below as best suites nearby plant life and or the land use below.
      • Seventh, one optional accessory for the roadway section, is lighting on the base of the enclosure which can be directed downward as best suites the land use below. Such lighting can, if appropriate, be ‘grow-lights’ which could offset the shadowing effect or even enhance plant growth so as to encourage gardening below the roadway.
      • Eighth, another optional accessory is solar panels, which can be included on the roofs of the enclosed, elevated roadways. This environmentally friendly technology converts sunlight into electric power and would not require dedicated land areas.
      • Ninth, another environmentally friendly optional accessory is electrical and fiber optic cable conduits placed inside the roadway track enclosure sections. These provide the possibility of hiding telephone, electrical power and cable TV lines inside these conduits and out-of-sight and eliminating unsightly utility poles thereby improving the neighborhood's aesthetics.
      • Tenth, one embodiment of the roadway network's track components employs natural wood planks for the roadway surface and one embodiment of the track enclosure sections employs natural wood, albeit plywood, sheathing for the side walls and roofs. These natural and environmentally friendly materials are suitable and preferred materials for many of the pre-manufactured components.
    • And so, by taking note of these ten environmentally friendly benefits; benefits that have been pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured into the disclosed master-set of components used to assemble roadway sections; the planner will be select certain design configurations that may have more environmentally beneficial characteristics than others.
    • The specifics of the methods for selecting and applying these available options will be described below; for, there are other beneficial characteristics that considered as well prior to choosing the preferred configurations. Such other benefits include securing public support, minimizing implementation times and minimizing costs.
    • 2. Securing public support, minimizing implementation times and minimizing costs. An enclosed, elevated roadway network assembled from the disclosed master-set of components and planned according to this disclosed process is intended to have the following benefits in addition to being environmentally friendly; and, the disclosed master-set of components is pre-designed, pre-engineered and pre-manufactured so as to realize these benefits. Incur minimum implementation time and delays; including the planning, designing, acquiring rights-of-way, zoning and construction phases. Minimize costs incurred by planning, design and engineering efforts; minimum land acquisition costs; minimum site preparation costs; minimum manufacturing and materials costs; minimum construction costs; and, minimum cost allocations due to risks and uncertainties.
      • First, consider public support from the ‘environmentally friendly’ aspect. It is well known that, in many present day societies, a major construction project that is environmentally friendly will fare better in public opinion than one that is not. Above, ten environmentally friendly aspects were described and discussed.
      • Second, consider public support from the ‘expected and actual implementation time’ aspect and the ‘minimum cost’ aspect. It is well known that, in many present day societies, a short anticipated implementation time and a lower total cost project will fare better in public opinion than one that is lengthy, costly and subject to perceived risks and uncertainties. After implementation has begun, further extending the timeline for milestones and additional delays and/or an upward revision of cost estimates contribute to an unfavorable public response.
      • Third, consider public support from the ‘emergency management’ aspect. The roadway network being discussed could be considered as an alternative, effective and realistic emergency transportation system. In the event of an emergency it would be possible that its existence could well-serve the community by providing critical functions. These would be to allow citizens to vacate dangerous areas and allow emergency workers to move about the region. Consider that: it is not dependent on power from the electrical grid system supplying most cities, so it would not cease to function in the event of a blackout. It does not have ‘drivers’ or ‘conductors’ and could be operated independently from other public transportation systems and, so, may not be effected by strikes or work stoppages. It is separate and independent from the existing roadway networks serving motor vehicles and rail systems, so it would not be affected by normal traffic congestion or railway stoppage. Since it users are on foot or riding bicycles, to a large extent, it would be relatively immune to internal traffic congestion so as to stop its traffic flow. That is to say, a bicycle rider can, and customarily does, pick up his bike and carry it over or around obstacles. Furthermore, any breakdowns could be easily moved out of traffic lanes by a single person, with no ‘tow-truck’ needed.
      • Next, let us consider the anticipated implementation time. Here, though, we shall primarily consider the planning, design and engineering time since the construction and pre-operation phases will be discussed below.
      • As has been described above; as step 5 of this method and process for planning an enclosed, elevated roadway network for bicycles, other small vehicles and pedestrians; the planner refers to the ‘Roadway Designer's Manual’ and/or makes use of the ‘Roadway Computer Assisted Design Software and Database’ to select appropriate components to configure modular sections of roadway. Since the master-set of components that forms the basis for this process has been pre-designed and pre-engineered, his task has been greatly simplified and reduced to selecting appropriate components, from the said manual and/or database, that meet the traffic-flow capacity requirements and basic functionality as was determined in step 4 of this method and process.
      • Methods and processes using prior art, however, have no such master-set of components as the disclosed master-set; and, clearly, there are no reference manuals or databases for designers of an enclosed, elevated roadway networks such as those disclosed above. Furthermore, there were no pre-designed or pre-engineered components intended to be and suitable for assembly into modular roadway sections. And so, when using prior art, the planning process would require extensive original, creative roadway design work, research time and effort, component designing efforts, engineering analysis and testing procedures, to suggest only some of the time consuming obstacles.
      • And so, as would be obvious to one familiar with the art of enclosed, elevated roadway design and engineering, the disclosed method, which makes use of the disclosed master-set of components and the ‘Roadway Designer's Manual’ would greatly speed-up the planning process and considerably reduce these phases of the implementation process.
      • Next, let us consider the costs associated with the implementation. Here, though, we shall primarily consider the planning, design and engineering costs since the construction and pre-operation phases will be discussed below. Significant additional costs would also be incurred should there be a lack of widespread public support and/or adversarial legal actions.
      • As compared to methods and processes using prior art, it has been shown above that a significant reduction in time required for preliminary design would be enjoyed by employing the methods disclosed in step 5, above. This would, clearly, translate into a related reduction in costs. It was further shown that engineering analysis—calculation of wind, snow and other structural loading, truss design and structural strength analyses being some examples—would be significantly reduced or eliminated. And, from the aspect of public support, it has been shown that the project—that is, implementation of a roadway network throughout a city which is environmentally friendly and efficient in terms of time and expenditures—would be less likely to face public opposition and, accordingly, there would be less likelihood of adversarial legal actions, both of which would reduce expected costs.
      • Next, let us consider the cost of land and rights-of-way acquisition costs. The building of a roadway network throughout a city would require purchasing land and purchasing a right-of-way to pass through or over land beneath or near to the roadways and other facilities. Clearly, such costs would be lowered if the routing of the roadways was through or over land currently owned by or controlled by the builder. So, using a ‘city’ as our example region and, as an example only, we consider the ‘city’ as the legal entity building the roadway network; routing the roadways along routes above or alongside of roadways, parks, existing trails, public utility lines, rivers, railroad tracks and other such pathways would result in less time and costs to acquire such rights-of-way. Even though some of the cited examples say utility lines and railroad tracks, may not be owned by the city, negotiations with the owners could well be less costly than negotiating with many individual private landowners.
    • In conclusion, as previously stated, the results obtained in step 5 would, in many cases, provide several alternative configurations that might be selected for each section of roadway. However, we have now disclosed several potentially beneficial factors—be environmentally friendly, gain public support, minimize implementation times and minimizing costs—that should also be considered as a basis for selection of a roadway configuration, these in addition to it merely being a ‘suitable’ configuration.
    • Accordingly, this step 6, of the definition of methods and process for planning the routing and desired functionalities of a network of roadways, will be to establish additional objectives. These objectives will form a basis for the planner to evaluate, compare and rate alternative configurations, as were calculated in step 5, relative to one-another for the purpose of selecting the preferred configurations for roadway sections and to refine the routing as was defined schematically in step 4.
    • The roadway network design objectives: The planner should plan the routing and functionality of each portion of the roadway network and configure the individual modular sections of the roadway so as to best meet the following objectives:
    • a. Objective 1—It must be functional.
      • The network must operate smoothly, safely, reliably and properly. That is, it must meet the intended functions of allowing people to move about the city with ease, comfort and safety; it must provide a convenient, safe and pleasant recreational facility; and, it should offer other valuable benefits to the city.
    • b. Objective 2—It must meet user needs and preferences.
      • The network should offer additional functions to provide convenience for the users and make the network pleasant and user friendly.
    • c. Objective 3—It must be environmentally friendly.
      • Another objective is to construct and operate the network while having a minimum impact on the land, plant life, wildlife, water flow, roadways, structures and existing or planned use of the areas beneath and nearby the network's roadways and other facilities; and, incorporate other ‘environmentally friendly’ features.
    • d. Objective 4—It should obtain public support and avoid public opposition.
    • e. Objective 5—It must minimize implementation times
      • It must minimize time delays include the planning, design, engineering, manufacturing and construction time.
    • f. Objective 6—It must minimize costs
      • Costs include planning, design and engineering efforts, land acquisition costs, site preparation costs, manufacturing and materials costs and construction costs and the cost allocated to risks and uncertainties.
    • g. Objective 7—It should provide an alternative emergency transportation system.
  • 7. Prepare final routing and detailed design.
    • In summary: To this point, step 4 described a method to develop a schematic route map for the region, specifically a city. Step 5 described how the planner can readily and obviously use ‘The Roadway Designer's Manual’ to select components to be assembled into modular roadway sections; and, how these sections can be joined together to form a stretch of roadway corresponding to a portion of the schematically represented route. In so doing, that stretch of roadway was reduced to a detailed design and could be displayed on a computer screen via a suitable CAD software program and plotted as a physical drawing.
    • However, as was pointed out in step 6, there could be numerous feasible choices for a detailed route plan—by this, we mean specifying the specific streets to follow and where to cross over a particular train track, for example—which may not have been specified in the schematic plan of step 4. Also, there could be several, alternative configurations for any of the modular roadway sections; this is because step 4 only determined the traffic-flow capacity required and the general location of each portion of the route.
    • Step 6 developed additional objectives and summarized several objectives the planner may wish to consider. By selecting the applicable objectives and applying a weighting factor to each, the planner would now have a basis for evaluating and comparing and rating each detail option and, so, a basis for choosing the preferred route details and the preferred roadway configurations along said route.
    • The final step in the disclosed methods and process, step 7, would be for the planner to select the preferred route details, map them, select the preferred configurations and describe them to create his final ‘route plan and design specifications’. Other typical inclusions, as would be well-known to a person skilled in the art of developing specifications for a similar construction project, may include artistic renderings, time and cost estimates and compilations of other supporting data such as would be required prior to making actual funding requests or moving on to the construction planning phase of the roadway network implementation.
  • 8. Incorporate desired functionalities. After select the preferred routing and route details as described in step 7, the designer will consider and specify the additional desired functionalities at each point along the roadway network.
    • During the process of selecting components to be assembled into modular roadway sections, as described in steps 4, 5 and 6, the designed primarily considered only the traffic-flow requirements, which determined the width or number of lanes included in each section of roadway, and the preferred pathways through neighborhoods. There are, however, additional functional that can be added.
    • Such functionalities include, but are not limited to:
      • Entrance ramps and merging lanes
      • Exit ramps and exit lanes
      • Roadway intersections
      • Roadway turn-offs
      • Passing lanes
      • Rest stops
      • Emergency pull-offs
      • Turning lanes
      • Wyes, cul-de-sacs and U-turn areas.

FIG. 14 illustrates, conceptually, how such capabilities or functionalities might be incorporated into the roadway designs.

Claims

1-22. (canceled)

23. A master set of components where each member component of said master set is an assemblage specifically designed and assembled for use as a component of a modular roadway, where said modular roadway is for the exclusive use of humans engaging in activities selected from the group of activities which includes walking, running, skating, walking a pet, riding a bicycle, riding a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds and resting from and preparing for such activities, said humans herein referred to as users, and

where said master set comprises three subsets, herein referred to, respectively, as the first track subset, the second barrier-wall subset and the third structural support subset, and
a) where any member selected from the first track subset, herein referred to as member-T, includes at least one substantially flat roadway surface, said roadway surfaces providing at least one predetermined functionality for the users, and a means for said member-T to be attached to selected members of said second barrier-wall subset, and when so attached, form an assemblage, herein referred to as an assemblage-A, and
b) where any member selected from the second barrier-wall subset, includes a means to be attached to selected members of said first track subset, and includes at least one substantially vertical element suitable to guide users of the roadway surfaces in intended directions, when said member and said selected members of the first track subset are attached together in an assemblage-A, and
c) where any member selected from the third structural support subset, includes at least one structural support element, which implements a predetermined structural support method, and a first means to connect said structural support elements to at least one stable platform in a predetermined disposition with respect to nearby points on the earth's surface, and a second means to connect said structural support elements to an assemblage-A, thereby supporting assemblage-A and implementing said structural support method, and wherein each of said three subsets includes a multitude of member components, and includes an inexhaustible supply of replicates of each unique combination of member physical properties, wherefrom a plurality of components can be selected, respectively, from each of said subsets, suitable to assemble a multitude of modular elements, where said modular elements will have a desired size and shape, provide desired functionalities, be disposed in a predetermined, substantially fixed disposition with respect to one another and to nearby points on the earth's surface and be suitable for use as elements of such a modular roadway; whereby, a constructor of a modular roadway, can select a plurality of suitable components from said master set of components and, using said components, assemble a multitude of modular elements, where said modular elements have desired shapes and sizes and provide desired functionalities, and whereby said modular elements can be substantially fixed in desired dispositions relative to the earth's surface, and whereby said modular elements can be connected together, respectively, each being fixed in a predetermined desirable disposition with respect to one another such that the roadway surfaces included in said modular elements are joined together in a contiguous manner, thereby constructing such a modular roadway.

24. A master set of components, according to claim 1, wherein any selected member of said first track subset further includes at least one roadway surface upon which users can travel in predetermined travel paths when said member is disposed in its intended disposition, said travel paths herein referred to as traffic lane configurations, and wherein said first track subset includes members, collectively, having a multitude of sizes and shapes and traffic lane configurations, and wherein said traffic lane configurations include:

a) straight traffic lanes, suitable for users to travel in a substantially straight horizontal direction, and
b) multiple traffic lanes, these having a plurality of traffic lanes, substantially side-by-side, suitable for a plurality of users to travel side-by-side or in opposing directions, and
c) inclined traffic lanes, suitable for users to travel on an incline, these having an ascending or descending component direction relative to horizontal, and
d) curved traffic lanes, suitable for users to travel in an arc having a predetermined radius and a predetermined arc length, and
e) turn-off shaped traffic lanes, suitable for users travelling in one direction to choose an alternative direction for continued travel, and for users travelling in a substantially opposing direction to merge into a single direction for continued travel, and
f) wye shaped traffic lanes, suitable for users travelling in one direction to choose between two or more alternative directions for continued travel, and for users travelling in other directions to merge into a single direction for continued travel, and
g) intersections, these allowing two or more traffic lanes, disposed in different directions, to cross one another on the same horizontal plane, and
h) width transitions, these providing a smooth transition between one multi-lane roadway surface and another roadway surface, where the two roadway surfaces have a different number of lanes travelling in substantially the same horizontal direction, and
i) passing lanes and pull-off areas and rest areas, these including areas adjacent to the traffic lanes so as to provide users the option to temporarily move out of a traffic lane, to travel faster or slower or stop for a period of time, then return to a traffic lane.

25. A master set of components, according to claim 1, wherein said second barrier-wall subset includes members, each of which further include:

a) at least one roof element, and
b) at least one window element disposed between said substantially vertical element and said roof element, and joined together with said roof element and with said substantially vertical element so as to form an assemblage partially enclosing said roadway surface, and
c) a means for structurally joining said roof elements, said window elements and said substantially vertical elements into a substantially rigid assemblage,
whereby, said second barrier-wall subset further includes members providing a means for enclosing and partially protecting said roadway surface from the weather.

26. A master set of components, according to claim 1, wherein said third structural support subset includes members, collectively, having a multitude of sizes and shapes and functions, wherein said member functions include:

a) trusses, columns, beams, arches, towers and cables,
b) support bases,
c) connectors and braces,
d) support footers, and
wherein selected members can be assembled into support configurations implementing a predetermined support method and supporting an assemblage-A at a predetermined elevation and disposition,
wherein said support configurations include:
a) one or more substantially horizontal trusses, each attached to two legs, one leg being disposed at each end of said horizontal trusses, with said legs being further attached to stable platforms, wherein said assemblage-A is partially supported by the support method of hanging from said horizontal trusses, and
b) one or more substantially horizontal trusses, each attached to two legs, one leg being disposed at each end of said horizontal trusses, with said legs being further attached to stable platforms, wherein said assemblage-A is partially supported by the support method of resting on said horizontal trusses, and
c) one or more suspension cables, each passing over two or more towers, said towers resting on stable platforms, and having each end of said cables attached to stable platforms, wherein said assemblage-A is partially supported by the support method of hanging from said suspension cables, and
d) one or more elongated structural support elements, having a horizontal component and being rigidly attached to stable platforms, wherein said assemblage-A is partially supported by the support method of hanging from said support elements, and
e) one or more elongated structural support elements, having a horizontal component and being rigidly attached to stable platforms, wherein said assemblage-A is partially supported by the support method of resting on said support elements, and
f) one or more arch-shaped trusses, each attached to two legs, one leg being disposed at each end of said trusses, with said legs being further attached to stable platforms, wherein said assemblage-A is partially supported by the support method of hanging from said trusses, and
g) one or more columns, one end of which is attached to a stable platform, wherein said assemblage-A is partially supported by resting on said columns.

27. A modular element intended and suitable to serve as a segment of a modular roadway, where said modular roadway is for the exclusive use of humans engaging in activities selected from the group of activities which includes walking, running, skating, walking a pet, riding a bicycle, riding a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds and resting from and preparing for such activities, and

wherein said modular element comprises a plurality of components selected from the master set of components according to claim 1.

28. A modular element intended and suitable to serve as a segment of a modular roadway, where said modular roadway is for the exclusive use of humans engaging in activities selected from the group of activities which includes walking, running, skating, walking a pet, riding a bicycle, riding a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds and resting from and preparing for such activities, and

wherein said modular element comprises a plurality of components selected from the master set of components according to claim 3.

29. A group of modular structures, said structures being for the exclusive use of humans engaging in activities selected from the group of activities which includes walking, running, skating, walking a pet, riding a bicycle, riding a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds and resting from and preparing for such activities and functions carried out in conjunction with such activities, said humans herein referred to as users, wherein any modular structure selected from said group comprises:

a) at least one substantially flat plane, said planes including a roadway surface, herein referred to as roadways-A, and
b) at least one area, herein referred to as a function area, comprising a floor and one or more walls, where said function areas provide predetermined functionality for said users and are disposed so as to be accessible by said users, and
c) at least one roof, covering said roadway surfaces and said function areas, and
d) at least one elongated structural support element, and
e) a means to connect said planes, said roadways-A, said function areas, said roofs and said structural support elements, respectively, together so as to form a substantially rigid assemblage, herein referred to as assemblage-B, and
f) a means to attach said structural support elements to one or more stable platforms, thereby disposing said assemblage-B in a substantially fixed disposition with respect to a nearby point on the earth's surface, and
g) a means to attach said assemblage-B to one or more external roadways, said external roadways being suitable and intended for use by said users, where said roadways-A and said external roadways are disposed in a contiguous manner such that said users can move freely between them,
whereby, a constructor of a modular roadway, where said modular roadway is for the exclusive use of humans engaging in activities selected from the group of activities which includes walking, running, skating, walking a pet, riding a bicycle, riding a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds and resting from and preparing for such activities, can select one or more modular structures from said group of modular structures, each of said selected structures providing predetermined functionalities for the users, and attach them, respectively, to other suitable modular roadway elements so as to incorporate said functionalities into said modular roadway.

30. A group of modular structures according to claim 7, wherein said predetermined functionalities include entrance ramps, exit ramps, rest rooms, concession stands, meeting rooms, locker rooms, vehicle storage rooms and administrative offices.

31. An assemblage comprising a plurality of modular elements, where each of said modular elements is designed and suitable for use as a segment of a modular-roadway for the exclusive use of humans engaging in activities selected from the group of activities which includes walking, running, skating, walking a pet, riding a bicycle, riding a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds and resting from and preparing for such activities, wherein any modular element selected from said assemblage, herein referred to as module-A, comprises:

i. one or more track components, selected from the first set of track components, herein referred to as components-T, where said components-T include one or more roadway surfaces and provide one or more functionalities, and
ii. one or more barrier-wall components, selected from the second set of barrier-wall components, suitable to be mated with and attached to said track components-T, herein referred to as components-W, and
iii. one or more structural support components, selected from the third set of structural support components, herein referred to as components-S, where said components-S include one or more stable platform connection points, and one or more roadway-connection points, and
iv. a first means, to attach components-S to stable platforms in predetermined dispositions relative to one another and said stable platforms, where said stable platforms are in a substantially fixed and predetermined disposition relative to a nearby predetermined point on the earth's surface, and
v. a second means, to respectively attach said track components-T and said barrier-wall components-W together, each in a predetermined disposition relative to one another, forming a substantially rigid assemblage, herein referred to as assemblage-M, and
vi. a third means, to attach said assemblage-M to said structural supports in a predetermined disposition relative to each other and relative to a horizontal plane, and
vii. a fourth means, to attach said module-A, respectively, to the other modular-roadway elements included in said assemblage comprising a plurality of modular elements, whereby, said assemblage, comprising module-A and said other modular elements, will be held in a substantially fixed and predetermined disposition relative to predetermined points on the earth's surface, and said assemblage will provide functionalities by means of the intended travel direction paths of the included roadway surfaces, thereby creating a segment of a modular-roadway;
where:
a) the first set of track components comprises a multitude of members; wherein any member track component selected from said first set, herein referred to as component-T1, has a predetermined size and shape and provides one or more functionalities, and includes a means to be attached together with one or more members selected from the second set of barrier-wall components, herein referred to as components-W1, where said barrier-wall components-W1 have predetermined sizes and shapes suitable for such attachment, and where, said component-T1 comprises: a) a substantially flat roadway surface: a. having a predefined intended traffic direction at each point on said surface, and b. having a width direction at each point on said surface, this being perpendicular to the intended traffic direction, and c. having one or more predefined travel direction paths, these being a path traced by an object travelling across said roadway surface while moving in the intended travel direction at each point along said path, and d. having two or more predefined end-edges, these being edges of said surface intersected by an intended travel direction path, and e. having two or more predefined side-edges, these being edges that are not intersected by an intended travel direction path, and f. having a width value at each point along each travel direction path, this being the distance from a starting point on one side-edge to an ending point on the first encountered opposing side-edge, while travelling in the width direction and passing through said point, where said width value is sufficiently large to accommodate at least one lane of pedestrian, bicycle or other small vehicle traffic travelling on said traffic direction path, and where said intended travel direction paths define one or more functionalities provided by said roadway surface, and b) a first means for structurally stiffening and strengthening said roadway surface, and c) a second means for connecting each end-edge of said component-T1 to an end-edge of another selected suitable track component member of said first set, thereby creating an assemblage having a travel direction path length substantially equal to the sum of a travel direction path lengths of each component so connected, and d) a third means for connecting at least one side-edge of said component-T1 to a side-edge of another selected suitable track component member of said first set, thereby creating an assemblage having a width value substantially equal to the sum of a width values of each component so connected, and e) a fourth means for respectively connecting together said component-T1 and said components-W1, each in their intended dispositions with respect to one another and a horizontal plane, thereby forming a substantially rigid assemblage; and, wherein said first set of track components includes a sufficient quantity and variety of member sizes and shapes and provided functionalities, and includes an inexhaustible supply of replicates of each unique combination, such that there is at least one member that can be selected from said set that has a suitable size and shape and provided functionality for use in a modular element having a desired size and shape and provided functionalities; and,
b) the second set of barrier-wall components is comprised of a multitude of members; wherein any member barrier-wall component selected from said second set, herein referred to as component-W2, has a predetermined size and shape and a means to be attached together with at least one member selected from the first set of track components, herein referred to as components-T2, where said track components-T2 have predetermined sizes and shapes suitable for such attachment, and where said components-T2 include at least one substantially flat roadway surface, where, said component-W2 includes: i. at least one elongated barrier element: i) having predefined lengthwise shapes, these being the paths an elongated edge of said barrier elements project on a horizontal plane when component-W2 and components-T2 are attached in the intended disposition relative to one another and to a horizontal plane, and ii) having predetermined barrier lengths, this being the distances between the endpoints of said lengthwise shapes, and iii) having predetermined barrier heights, these being measured in a vertical direction at each point along said lengthwise shapes, sufficient for directing traffic-flow along said roadway surfaces when component-W2 and components-T2 are attached together, respectively, in their intended dispositions, and ii. at least one elongated structural load-bearing element: i) having predefined lengthwise shapes, these being the paths an elongated edge of said load-bearing elements project on a horizontal plane when component-W2 and components-T2 are attached together in the intended dispositions relative to one another and to a horizontal plane, and ii) having predetermined lengths, these being the distances between the endpoints of said lengthwise shapes, which are substantially equal to said barrier lengths, and iii) having predetermined cross-sectional profiles, at each point along their lengths, suitable to provide adequate structural strength properties, and iii. a first means for structurally joining said elongated barrier elements and said elongated structural load-bearing elements together in predetermined dispositions relative to one another so as to form substantially rigid assemblages, and iv. a second means for connecting said component-W2 to said components-T2 in predetermined dispositions relative to one another, and v. a third means for connecting said component-W2 to other selected components of said second set of barrier-wall components in predetermined dispositions relative to one another, and vi. a fourth means for structurally joining said elongated barrier elements and said elongated structural load-bearing elements, respectively, into a substantially rigid assemblage, where said component-W2 has a predetermined cross-sectional profile and length and shape such that, when suitably mated with and attached to components-T2 in the intended dispositions, said component-W2 will be disposed so as to effectively direct traffic-flow on the roadway surfaces of components-T2, and where said component-W2, when suitably mated with and attached to components-T2 and any additional components selected from said second set as may be required to complete a desired configuration, said components connected together in their respective intended dispositions, will provide suitable structural strength properties to the assemblage comprised of said connected components such that said assemblage can span a predetermined distance and suitably support predetermined loadings while being supported only at its ends, and wherein said second set of barrier-wall components includes a sufficient quantity and sufficient variety of member sizes, shapes and cross-sectional profiles, and includes an inexhaustible supply of replicates of each unique configuration, such that there is at least one member that can be selected from said second set that is compatible with and suitable for attachment to any member selected from the first set of track components suitable for such attachment;
c) the third set of structural support components is comprised of a multitude of members; wherein any member structural support component selected from said third set, herein referred to as component-S3, comprises: i. at least one structural load supporting element, where said structural load supporting elements are suitable for implementing at least one structural support method, and ii. at least one stable platform connection point, these being points on said load supporting elements where said load supporting elements are intended to be attached to one or more stable platforms in predetermined dispositions relative to said stable platforms, and iii. at least one roadway-connection point, these being points on said load supporting elements where said load supporting elements are intended to be attached to one or more assemblages, each of which includes at least one track component, herein referred to as assemblages-M3, in predetermined dispositions relative to one another, and iv. a means for said load supporting elements to be attached to said stable platforms, substantially at one or more of said stable platform connection points, in predetermined dispositions relative to a horizontal plane, and v. a means for said load supporting elements to be attached to said assemblages-M3, substantially at one or more of said roadway-connection points, respectively, in predetermined dispositions relative to each other and to a horizontal plane, thereby implementing at least one structural support method, and wherein said third set of structural support components includes a sufficient quantity and sufficient variety of member sizes, shapes and support methods, and includes an inexhaustible supply of replicates of each unique configuration, such that it contains at least one member structural support component suitable for being attached to a predetermined stable platform, where said stable platform is in a substantially fixed disposition relative to a nearby point on the earth's surface, and also suitable for being attached to a predetermined assemblage, including at least one roadway surface, in a predetermined disposition relative to one another and to a horizontal plane, thereby structurally supporting said assemblage and the included roadway surface in a substantially fixed disposition relative to the earth's surface; wherein, each of said three sets of components includes a sufficient quantity and sufficient variety of members such that one or more components can be selected from each of these three sets and assembled into modular elements, which include at least one roadway surface, and which have a suitable size and shape, and which provide desired functionalities on said roadway surfaces, and which will be held in a substantially fixed disposition relative to predetermined nearby points on the earth's surface, thereby creating a segment of a modular-roadway intended and suitable for the exclusive use of pedestrians, bicycles and other vehicles weighing less than 500 pounds; whereby, a constructor of a modular roadway, can select a plurality of components from said sets of components suitable to assemble modular elements having a desired shape and size, providing desired functionalities and being substantially fixed in a desired disposition relative to the nearby terrain, and whereby said modular elements can be connected to other modular elements, respectively, each being fixed in a predetermined disposition such the roadway surfaces included in each modular section are joined together in a contiguous manner, thereby constructing a segment of a modular-roadway.

32. An assemblage comprising a plurality of modular elements, according to claim 9, where one or more of said barrier-wall components-W further includes:

a) at least one roof element: i. disposed above said roadway surfaces when said components-W and components-T are attached together, respectively, in the intended disposition with respect to one another and said roadway surfaces, and to a horizontal plane, and ii. are disposed sufficiently high, relative to said roadway surfaces, so as to allow users of the roadway surfaces to move freely beneath them, and iii. are suitable to partially protect said roadway surfaces from rain and other forms of precipitation, and
b) at least one window element: i. disposed between said elongated barrier element and said roof element, and ii. joined together with said roof element and with said elongated barrier element so as to form an assemblage partially enclosing said roadway surface, and
c) a means for structurally joining said roof elements, said window elements, said elongated barrier elements and said elongated structural load-bearing elements into a substantially rigid assemblage, whereby, said barrier-wall components further provide a means for enclosing and partially protecting said roadway surface from the weather, and whereby, a constructor of a modular roadway, can select a plurality of components from said sets of components suitable to assemble modular elements having a desired shape and size, including a roadway surface protected from the weather, providing desired functionalities and being substantially fixed in a desired disposition relative to the nearby terrain, and whereby said modular elements can be connected to other modular elements, respectively, each being fixed in a predetermined disposition such the roadway surfaces included in each modular section are joined together in a contiguous manner, thereby constructing a segment of a modular-roadway.

33. A roadway network comprising a multitude of assemblages of modular elements according to claim 10, said roadway network being intended and suitable for the exclusive use of humans while engaging in an activity selected from the group of activities which includes walking, running, skating, riding a bicycle, riding on a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds, resting from or preparing for such activities and functions carried out in conjunction with such activities.

34. A roadway network according to claim 11, further comprising at least one modular structure, selected from the group of modular structures according to claim 7.

35. A roadway network comprising a multitude of modular elements according to claim 5, said roadway network being intended and suitable for the exclusive use of humans while engaging in an activity selected from the group of activities which includes walking, running, skating, riding a bicycle, riding on a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds, resting from or preparing for such activities and functions carried out in conjunction with such activities.

36. A roadway network comprising a multitude of modular elements according to claim 6, said roadway network being intended and suitable for the exclusive use of humans while engaging in an activity selected from the group of activities which includes walking, running, skating, riding a bicycle, riding on a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds, resting from or preparing for such activities and functions carried out in conjunction with such activities.

37. A sports facility track, comprising:

a plurality of modular elements, respectively connected together, thereby forming a modular track, where said modular track is intended and suitable for the exclusive use of humans while engaging in a sports activity selected from the group of activities which includes walking, running, skating, riding a polycycle and resting from or preparing for such activities,
wherein each of said modular elements comprises a plurality of components selected from the master set of components according to claim 1, and includes at least one component selected from each of said three subsets according to claim 1.

38. A method to assist a designer of a modular roadway, said roadway to be designed for the exclusive use of humans engaging in an activity selected from the group of activities including walking, running, skating, riding a bicycle, riding a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds and resting from or preparing for such activities, to select components from a set of available components, where said components are suitable for assembly into modular sections of said modular roadway, where each of said modular sections includes at least one roadway surface, and where each of said modular sections:

a) is to have a desired shape and size, and
b) is to provide desired functionalities, and
c) is to be substantially fixed in a desired disposition relative to a predetermined terrain, and
d) is to be connected together with at least one other of said modular sections, each, respectively, being fixed in a predetermined disposition with respect to one another, such that the roadway surfaces included in said modular sections are joined together in a contiguous manner,
comprising the steps of: a. assembling Illustrations, physical property data and other useful information for each unique component contained in the master set of components according to claim 1, b. assembling Illustrations, physical property data and other useful information for of each unique modular structures according to claim 6, c. tabulating the required and the optional interconnectivity data and assemblage rules for each preferred combination of said components and said structures, and d. converting said illustrations, physical property data and other useful information into digitized files suitable for being accessed and viewed by means of a compatible computer software program, and e. converting said interconnectivity data and assemblage rules into digitized files suitable for being accessed and viewed by means of a suitable computer software program, and f. organizing, cataloging and inserting said digitized files into a indexed and searchable computer data base, g. presenting said illustrations, said physical property data, said other useful information, said interconnectivity data and said assemblage rules, by means of suitable computer software program, into a humanly readable document,
whereby an indexed and searchable document is created suitable for providing designers of such a modular roadway with a method for finding, analyzing and selecting suitable components with which to configure modular sections of such a modular roadway.

39. A method to assist a designer of a modular roadway, according to claim 16, further comprising the steps of:

a. presenting said illustrations, said physical property data, said other useful information, said interconnectivity data and said assemblage rules on a computer monitor, and
b. providing a means to indicate desired components and desired modular structures, contained in said database, herein referred to as selected elements, and
c. providing a computer software program suitable for recognizing said selected elements, for accumulating and tabulating all selected elements into a set of selected elements, for interpreting the interconnectivity data and assemblage rules for each element in the set of selected elements so as to determine the suitability and completeness of said selected set, and
d. providing a means to edit, append and delete selected elements from said set of selected elements, and
e. export said set of selected elements into a CAD software program,
whereby a computer database is created that is compatible with one or more CAD software programs thereby providing planners and designers of enclosed and elevated roadways with a method for finding, analyzing and selecting suitable components with which to configure modular sections of an enclosed and elevated roadway and to combine said selected images into images of roadways and to display and plot said images of said roadways.

40. A process for planning and designing a modular roadway intended for the exclusive use of humans engaging in an activity selected from the group of activities including walking, running, skating, riding a bicycle, riding a vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds and resting from or preparing for such activities, comprising the steps of:

a) assembling maps, demographic data, zoning information, regional planning information and other appropriate information regarding the geographical region within which the enclosed, elevated roadway network shall exist; and
b) subdividing said geographical region into smaller regions or neighborhoods such that said smaller regions or neighborhoods will have somewhat homogeneous preferences and requirements as regards the enclosed, elevated roadway network; and
c) selecting and schematically indicating on said maps the approximate paths for roadway segments so as to interconnect said neighborhoods based on each ones preferences and requirements and so as to provide contiguous roadways between said neighborhoods and expected travel destinations; and
d) determining and schematically indicating on said maps the approximate locations of desired entrance and exit points for each segment of each roadway; and
e) calculating and recording the desired traffic-flow capacity between each entrance and exit point along each segment of each roadway; and
f) defining and recording the desired functionalities at each point along each segment of each roadway; and
g) determining and schematically indicating on said maps the approximate locations of desired roadway intersections, turn-offs, wyes and other conditions or requirements that may affect traffic-flow or require special consideration at each such point along each roadway;
wherein the disclosed improvement includes the following steps:
h) while referring to said maps having said information schematically indicated thereon and said recorded information and while referring to the indexed and searchable document according to claim 13, and
i) selecting and recording appropriate components suitable to configure modular sections of roadway that could be mated and connected together so as to form a roadway segment of the desired shape, length, traffic-flow capacity and functionalities at each point along each roadway segment; and
j) establishing a set of design objectives and a definable and measurable basis for comparing and evaluating and rating the various recorded alternative configurations for each modular section of roadway, with respect to one another; and
k) using said design objectives and basis for comparing and evaluating alternative recorded configurations for each modular section of roadway; evaluating alternative precise paths for each schematically indicated approximate path; and, evaluating alternative precise locations for each schematically indicated approximate location of entrances and exits; and, evaluating alternative precise locations of roadway intersections, turn-offs, wyes and other conditions for each schematically indicated approximate location; so as to determine a preferred configuration for each modular section of roadway for each of said requirements for each point along each segment of each roadway; Whereby a preferred configuration for each modular section of roadway, a preferred precise path for each segment of each roadway, a preferred precise location of entrances and exits for each segment of each roadway, a preferred precise location for each roadway intersection, turn-off, wye and other special condition for each point along each segment of each roadway will be determined and the planning, design and configuration of the enclosed, elevated roadway network for use by pedestrians, bicycles and other vehicles weighing less than 500 pounds will be accomplished.

41. A method for reducing highway traffic congestion within a geographical region, to predetermined levels, at a cost not to exceed a predetermined economically and politically acceptable threshold cost,

a) where said traffic congestion reduction is achieved by converting at least a predetermined success-threshold percentage of current and perspective motor vehicle users on said highways during selected time periods, into users of alternative means of mobility,
b) where said alternative means of mobility are selected from the group of alternative means which includes walking, running, riding a polycycle, skating and using a non-fossil fuel burning vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds,
comprising the steps of:
a) implementing a network of enclosed and elevated roadways serving said converted users within said region,
b) ensuring said network roadways are separate from and do not substantially interfere with traffic on said highways,
c) selecting a planning process, a roadway design and fabrication materials for said roadways such that the resulting implementation cost remains below the predetermined economically and politically acceptable threshold cost level,
d) selecting a roadway design and network roadway routing such that the resulting network enables and encourages current and perspective motor vehicle users to convert into users of alternative means of mobility within said network,
said network roadways further comprising:
e) a means for protecting users from inclement weather,
f) a means for segregating users from the dangers and unpleasant environment found on said highways used by motor vehicles,
g) a means for providing safety and security for users and their property, said means to include controlling access to and monitoring the activity within and nearby said roadways,
h) a means for users, located at any point within said geographical region, to enter said network by travelling no more than a predetermined acceptable distance, therein to travel to a exit point within said network, said exit point being no more than a predetermined acceptable distance from a desired destination, whereby, a geographical region, desiring to reduce traffic congestion within said region by a predetermined amount while remaining within a predetermined economically and politically justifiable cost level, can implement a network of enclosed and elevated roadways; having a design such that implementation costs do not exceed said justifiable cost level; and being segregated from said congested highways; and having characteristics that enable and encourage a sufficiently large percentage of current and perspective motor vehicle drivers to use alternative modes of transportation within said network; thereby reducing traffic congestion in said region by said predetermined amount.

42. A method for reducing the consumption of fossil fuel within a predefined region, to predetermined levels, at a cost not to exceed a predetermined economically and politically acceptable threshold cost,

a) where said reduced consumption is achieved by converting at least a predetermined success-threshold percentage of current and perspective motor vehicle users on said highways during selected time periods, into users of alternative means of mobility,
c) where said alternative means of mobility do not consume fossil fuel and are selected from the group of alternative means which includes walking, running, riding a polycycle, skating and using a non-fossil fuel burning vehicle weighing less than 500 pounds,
comprising the steps of:
a) implementing a network of enclosed and elevated roadways serving said converted users within said region,
b) selecting a planning process, a roadway design and fabrication materials for said roadways such that the resulting implementation cost remains below the predetermined economically and politically acceptable threshold cost level,
c) selecting a roadway design and network roadway routing such that the resulting network enables and encourages current and perspective motor vehicle users to convert into users of alternative means of mobility within said network, said network roadways further comprising:
a) a means for protecting users from inclement weather,
b) a means for segregating users from the dangers and unpleasant environment found on said highways used by motor vehicles,
c) a means for providing safety and security for users and their property, said means to include controlling access to and monitoring the activity within and nearby said roadways,
d) a means for users, located at any point within said geographical region, to enter said network by travelling no more than a predetermined acceptable distance, therein to travel to a exit point within said network, said exit point being no more than a predetermined acceptable distance from a desired destination, whereby, a geographical region, desiring to reduce the consumption of fossil fuel within said region by a predetermined amount while remaining within a predetermined economically and politically justifiable cost level, can implement a network of enclosed and elevated roadways; having a design such that implementation costs do not exceed said justifiable cost level; and having characteristics that enable and encourage a sufficiently large percentage of current and perspective motor vehicle drivers to use alternative modes of transportation within said network; thereby reducing fossil fuel consumption in said region by said predetermined amount.

43. A method for reducing obesity, improving health and reducing healthcare costs for citizens of a predefined region, to predetermined levels, at a cost not to exceed a predetermined economically and politically acceptable threshold cost, comprising the steps of:

a) where said reduced obesity and improved health are achieved by converting at least a predetermined success-threshold percentage of current and perspective motor vehicle users into users of alternative means of mobility incorporating aerobic physical activity and by enabling and encouraging regular aerobic exercise for all citizens over ten years of age,
b) where said reduced healthcare costs are achieved through well-known medical benefits of increased aerobic exercise, reduced obesity and reduced pedestrian and cyclist deaths and injuries caused by being struck by motor vehicles while riding, walking, running or skating on highways used by said motor vehicles,
c) where said alternative means of mobility incorporating aerobic physical activity are selected from the group of alternative means which includes walking, running, riding a polycycle and skating,
a) implementing a network of enclosed and elevated roadways serving said citizens within said region,
b) selecting a planning process, a roadway design and fabrication materials for said roadways such that the resulting implementation cost remains below the predetermined economically and politically acceptable threshold cost level,
c) selecting a roadway design and network roadway routing such that the resulting network enables and encourages current and perspective motor vehicle users to convert into users of alternative means of mobility within said network and enables and encourages all citizens over ten years of age to utilize said network for aerobic exercise,
said network roadways further comprising:
a) a means for protecting users from inclement weather,
b) a means for enabling and encouraging use evenings, weekends as well as daily commuting,
c) a means for segregating users from the dangers and unpleasant environment found on said highways used by motor vehicles,
d) a means for providing safety and security for users and their property, said means to include controlling access to and monitoring the activity within and nearby said roadways,
e) a means for users, located at any point within said geographical region, to enter said network by travelling no more than a predetermined acceptable distance, therein to travel to a exit point within said network, said exit point being no more than a predetermined acceptable distance from a desired destination,
f) a means for users, located at any point within said geographical region, to enter said network by travelling no more than a predetermined acceptable distance, therein to engage in aerobic exercise, then return to said entry point,
whereby, a geographical region, desiring to reduce obesity, improve health and reduce healthcare costs for its citizens by predetermined amounts while remaining within a predetermined economically and politically justifiable cost level, can implement a network of enclosed and elevated roadways; having a design such that implementation costs do not exceed said justifiable cost level; and having characteristics that enable and encourage a sufficiently large percentage of current and perspective motor vehicle drivers to use alternative modes of transportation incorporating aerobic exercise within said network; and encourage a sufficiently large percentage of citizens to utilize said network for aerobic exercising purposes; thereby reducing obesity, improving health and reducing healthcare costs within said region by said predetermined amounts.

44. A method for reducing pedestrian and bicyclist deaths and injuries within predefined region at a cost not to exceed a predetermined economically and politically acceptable threshold cost, comprising the steps of:

a) where said reduction in pedestrian and bicyclist deaths is achieved by providing safe routes to school, safe roadways for bicyclists and safe walkways for citizens of said region,
d) implementing a network of enclosed and elevated roadways serving said citizens within said region,
e) selecting a planning process, a roadway design and fabrication materials for said roadways such that the resulting implementation cost remains below the predetermined economically and politically acceptable threshold cost level,
f) selecting a roadway design and network roadway routing such that the resulting network provides roadways separated from highways used by motor vehicles,
g) selecting a roadway design and network roadway routing such that the resulting network enables and encourages all citizens over ten years of age to utilize said network to go to and from school, to travel within said network while walking, running or riding a bicycle,
said network roadways further comprising:
g) a means for protecting users from inclement weather,
h) a means for enabling and encouraging use evenings, weekends as well as daily commuting,
i) a means for segregating users from the dangers and unpleasant environment found on said highways used by motor vehicles,
j) a means for providing safety and security for users and their property, said means to include controlling access to and monitoring the activity within and nearby said roadways,
k) a means for users, located at any point within said geographical region, to enter said network by travelling no more than a predetermined acceptable distance, therein to travel to a exit point within said network, said exit point being no more than a predetermined acceptable distance from a desired destination,
l) a means for users, located at any point within said geographical region, to enter said network by travelling no more than a predetermined acceptable distance, therein to engage in recreational walking, running and cycling, then return to said entry point,
whereby, a geographical region, desiring to reducing pedestrian and bicyclist deaths and injuries by predetermined amounts while remaining within a predetermined economically and politically justifiable cost level, can implement a network of enclosed and elevated roadways; having a design such that implementation costs do not exceed said justifiable cost level; and having characteristics that enable and encourage a sufficiently large percentage of citizens to utilize said network for walking, going to and from school and cycling; thereby removing said users from highways used by motor vehicles and reducing pedestrian and cyclist deaths and injuries due to being struck by motor vehicles.

Patent History

Publication number: 20090214291
Type: Application
Filed: Oct 31, 2007
Publication Date: Aug 27, 2009
Inventor: Thomas P. Farr (Paoli, PA)
Application Number: 11/931,716

Classifications

Current U.S. Class: Road System (e.g., Elevated, Interchange) (404/1); Tubular Way (104/138.1)
International Classification: E01C 1/00 (20060101); B61B 13/10 (20060101);