CAMBER ADJUSTMENT SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR SNOW-RIDING DEVICES

The system comprises a first elongate blade and a second elongate blade. The second elongate blade is substantially in superposition with reference to the first blade. The first and the second blades are affixed together at one end. The system includes a user-actuated mechanism is connected at least to the second blade. The mechanism is selectively operable by a user of the snow-riding device to longitudinally reposition at least a portion of the second blade with reference to the first blade. This longitudinal repositioning modifies the efficient length ratio between the two blades and thereby the camber of the system. The system is self-contained and once integrated to the snow-riding device, the system permits a selective camber adjustment of at least a portion of the snow-riding device upon modifying the camber of the system.

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Description

TECHNICAL FIELD

The technical field relates generally to systems and methods for adjusting the camber of snow-riding devices.

BACKGROUND

Snow-riding devices, such as skis, snowboards and others, are available in a wide range of brands and models. Users generally select their snow-riding devices based on a plurality of factors, including for instance their riding ability, their weight and their budget. The camber and the stiffness of the snow-riding devices may also be part of the decision factors. For instance, on soft or powder snow, users generally prefer snow-riding devices having a convex undersurface profile (or “reverse camber”) so as to increase uplift and stability. However, a convex undersurface profile is often less desirable for use on hard or packed snow due to the restricted contact of the snow-riding devices with the snow-covered surface and the lack of pressure at the front and rear edges during turns.

Many snow-riding devices intended for the general public are designed with a concave undersurface profile. This profile is more widely used since it generally provides good performances on hard or packed snow surfaces, such as those found most of the time in ski resorts. The concave camber helps redistributing the gravitational and centripetal forces exerted by the user throughout a major portion of the length of the snow-riding device. When the user is turning, the pressure exerted on the snow-covered surface is more evenly distributed, therefore increasing grip and stability.

Although snow-riding devices with a concave undersurface profile can offer a good compromise for most users under various snow conditions, they can be difficult to use on soft or powder snow since the rearward uplift caused by the rear of the concave undersurface profile can amplify the tipping of the front of the snow-riding device. The user can then be constantly thrown forward and may have to lean backwards to counteract the effect. This unnatural position can decrease the front-rear stability and create physical discomfort or premature physical fatigue after only a few minutes.

Some arrangements have been suggested over the years in an attempt to adjust the camber of a snow-riding device. For instance, U.S. Pat. Pub. No. U.S. 2008/0042400 to Smith discloses an arrangement in which a user can vary the tension of a cable and thereby change the camber of a ski. This arrangement, however, can be quite cumbersome. It can also create internal stresses in the ski structure and may change the overall ski flexibility in an undesirable way when the device is engaged.

Other arrangements including a tensioning member located underneath the neutral axis of the ski have been suggested. However, these designs often induce a very large compressive stress inside the ski structure since they are very close to the neutral axis.

Clearly, room for improvement still exists in the area.

SUMMARY

In one aspect, there is provided a camber adjustment system as defined in claim 1.

In another aspect, there is provided a method for adjusting a camber of a snow-riding device as defined in claim 17.

Further details on these aspects as well as other aspects of the proposed concept will be apparent from the following detailed description and the appended figures.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is an exploded isometric view illustrating an example of a camber adjustment system for implementing the proposed concept;

FIG. 2 is an isometric view illustrating the neutral state of the system shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an isometric view illustrating an example of a cambered state of the system shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a semi-schematic view illustrating an example of a ski in which the proposed concept can be implemented;

FIG. 5 is an isometric cut-away view illustrating one of the systems embedded inside the ski structure after the manufacturing of the ski shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an isometric exploded view illustrating another example of a camber adjustment system for implementing the proposed concept;

FIG. 7 is an isometric cut-away view of a portion of the system shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a top view illustrating another example of a camber adjustment system for implementing the proposed concept, the system being shown in a neutral state;

FIG. 9 is a longitudinal side view of the system shown in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a top view of the system shown in FIG. 8 when the system is set in a cambered state;

FIG. 11 is a longitudinal side view of the system shown in FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a bottom view illustrating another example of a camber adjustment system for implementing the proposed concept, the system being shown in a neutral state;

FIG. 13 is a longitudinal side view of the system shown in FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a semi-schematic longitudinal side view illustrating an example of a ski profile when the systems therein are in a neutral state (stippled lines) and when the systems are in a cambered state (solid lines);

FIG. 15 is an isometric view illustrating another example of a camber adjustment system for implementing the proposed concept, the system being shown in a neutral position;

FIG. 16 is a longitudinal side view of the system shown in FIG. 15;

FIG. 17 is a top side view of the system shown in FIG. 15;

FIG. 18 is a longitudinal cross-section side view taken along lines 18-18 in FIG. 17, showing the system in a neutral state;

FIG. 19 is an enlarged longitudinal cross-section side view of the user-actuated mechanism in the system shown in FIG. 18;

FIG. 20 is an enlarged longitudinal cross-section side view taken along line 20-20 in FIG. 17;

FIG. 21 is a view similar to FIG. 18, showing the system in a cambered state; and

FIG. 22 is a view similar to FIG. 19, showing the mechanism when the system is in a cambered state; and

FIG. 23 is an isometric cut-away view illustrating the system of FIG. 15 embedded inside an example of a ski structure after the manufacturing of the ski.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIGS. 1 to 3 illustrate an example of a camber adjustment system 10 for implementing the proposed concept. FIG. 1 is an exploded isometric view thereof. FIGS. 2 and 3 are isometric views of the system 10 shown in FIG. 1, once assembled. This system 10 can be used with various kinds of snow-riding devices, for instance alpine skis, cross-country skis, snowboards, telemark skis, skate ski blades, etc. The user can adjust the camber of at least a portion of the snow-riding device by modifying the camber of the system 10. The system 10 is designed to be self-contained.

The system 10 illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 3 comprises a first elongate blade 12 extending along a first longitudinal axis 14. In this example, the first blade 12 includes a rectangular cross section and has generally flat opposite top and bottom main surfaces. Variants are also possible as well. The first blade 12 has opposite first and second end portions 12a, 12b.

The system 10 also comprises a second elongate blade 16 extending along a second longitudinal axis 18. The second blade 16 is substantially in superposition with reference to the first blade 12, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. In this example, the first longitudinal axis 14 and the second longitudinal axis 18 are substantially parallel to each other. Also, the first blade 12 and the second blade 16 include coextensive longitudinal sides. The second blade 16 has a rectangular cross section and generally flat opposite main faces. Variants are also possible as well. One of the main faces of the second blade 16 is facing a corresponding main face of the first blade 12. The second blade 16 has opposite first and second end portions 16a, 16b.

The second end portion 16b of the second blade 16 is affixed to the second end portion 12b of the first blade 12. This connection can be made using different arrangements and can also depend on the materials used for the blades 12, 16. For instance, the second end portions 12b, 16b can be affixed using a welding joint made around the bottom periphery of a plug hole 20 that is provided across the width of the first blade 12. Another possibility is to use a butt weld joint or a mechanical fastener, for instance a bolt or a rivet. It can also be glued and provided with an intermediate layer of elastic material to redistribute the shear stresses. This last type of connection can also mitigate the tangential pressure exerted on the structure of the snow-riding device towards its base. Still, the first and second blades 12, 16 can be formed from a bended monolithic piece. Many other variants are also possible.

The system 10 comprises a user actuated mechanism 30. In the example illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 3, this mechanism 30 is provided between the first end portion 12a of the first blade 12 and the first end portion 16a of the second blade 16. The mechanism 30 is selectively operable by a user of the snow-riding device to longitudinally reposition at least a portion of the first blade 12 with reference to the second blade 16, thereby changing the effective length ratio of the two blades 12, 16. In the illustrated example, the mechanism 30 can longitudinally reposition the first end portions 12a, 16a with reference to one another. When operating the mechanism 30, the user of the snow-riding device can generate a traction force along the second longitudinal axis 18 of the second blade 16 and an opposite compression force along the first longitudinal axis 14 of the first blade 12. At one point, the forces will move the first end portion 12a of the first blade 12 with reference to the second blade 16 and modify the effective length ratio of the two blades 12, 16, thereby modifying the camber of the system 10.

FIG. 2 illustrates the system 10 in a neutral state, i.e. with the mechanism 30 being inactive. FIG. 3 illustrates the system 10 in an example of a cambered state, i.e. after the mechanism 30 is tightened by the user of the snow-riding device. The straight stippled line 32 in FIGS. 2 and 3 is a reference line showing the modification of the camber of the system 10 from the neutral state (FIG. 2) and a cambered state (FIG. 3).

The mechanism 30 of FIGS. 1 to 3 comprises an end member 34 having a central hole 36 through which is inserted an adjustment screw 38. The end of the screw 38 is designed to engage a corresponding threaded sleeve 40 that is rigidly connected to the first end portion 16a of the second blade 16. The threaded sleeve 40 can be for instance welded to the periphery of a notch 42 provided at the first end portion 16a of the second blade 16. Other kinds of connections are also possible. The screw 38 has a screw head 44 by which the user can rotate the screw 38, for instance using a handheld tool. The screw 38 and the threaded sleeve 40 are oriented generally parallel to the second longitudinal axis 18 of the second blade 16. A notch 46 is provided in the first end portion 12a of the first blade 12 to accommodate the threaded sleeve 40 once the system 10 is assembled. Also, a reinforcing U-shaped member 48 is provided on the first end portion 12a of the first blade 12. This reinforcing member 48 is rigidly connected, for instance by welding, to the top face of the first blade 12. Other kinds of connections and other kinds of arrangements are also possible.

As shown in FIG. 2, the second blade 16 of the illustrated system 10 is made slightly shorter in length than the first blade 12. The end faces 50, 52 of the blades 12, 16 are thus offset relative to one another, leaving a space 54 between the interior face of the end member 34 and the end face 52 (FIG. 1) of the second blade 16. This configuration prevents the end face 52 of the second blade 16 from abutting the interior face of the end member 34 before the system 10 has reached its maximum cambered position. Other configurations are also possible.

The exact length of each system 10 can vary from one specific design to another. It can depend on a plurality of factors, such as the kind of snow-riding device, the length of the snow-riding device, the location of the system 10 therein, the number of systems 10 inside the snow-riding device and the desired range of camber variation. Other factors can also be taken into account. The width of the system 10 can vary from a few millimeters to almost the full width of the snow-riding device, depending on the material used as well as the aforementioned specific requirements.

FIG. 4 is a semi-schematic illustrating an alpine ski 100 as an example of a snow-riding device in which the proposed concept can be implemented. As aforesaid, the system 10 can be used with other kinds of snow-riding devices. Thus, although the snow-riding device is referred to hereafter as a ski, the word “ski” must be interpreted in a non-limiting manner.

FIG. 4 also shows that more than one system 10 can be used at the same time in a same snow-riding device, for instance the illustrated ski 100. In this example, two systems 10 are used. They are designed to be embedded in internal cavities within the structure of the snow-riding device. One can also use one or more systems 10 over the top surface of a snow-riding device. For instance, the system 10 could be positioned in a longitudinal groove made on the top surface of a ski and anchored to the ski using a plate or other arrangement.

With reference to the center of gravity of the ski 100, one of the systems 10 shown in FIGS. 1 to 3 can be located in a front portion 102 of the ski 100 and the other can be located in a rear portion 104 of the ski 100. The two systems 10 are oriented opposite to each other and also spaced from one another. An access port 106 allows the user to reach the screw heads 44 (FIG. 1) of the mechanism 30. It should be noted that it is also possible to use other kinds of camber adjustment systems in a ski or in another kind of snow-riding device. Still, one can use two different systems in the same ski. If desired, the number of camber adjustment systems can also be only one or more than two.

As shown in FIG. 4, a protective box 110 is positioned between the two systems 10. During the manufacturing of the ski, the box 110 is useful for preventing the bonding agent of the ski 100, for instance an epoxy resin, from filling a space provided for accessing the screw heads 44 during the manufacturing of the ski 100. The box 110 can include holes 112 in which the screw heads 44 are inserted when the box 110 is positioned within the ski structure. A tight fit between the short faces of the box 110 and the screw heads 44 can mitigate the bonding agent leaks into the box 110 when the ski is molded.

FIG. 5 is an isometric cut-away view illustrating one of the systems 10 embedded inside the structure of the ski 100 shown in FIG. 4. As shown, the materials provided between both faces of the ski 100 can include a plastic base 130, a wood core 132 reinforced on both sides by layers of composite materials, and a plastic top sheet 134. Variants are also possible. For instance, the wood core 132 can be replaced by a foam core. The construction can be, but not limited to, a cap, a semi-cap or a side wall construction.

Prior to the positioning of the systems 10 into the ski structure, the outer surfaces of the systems 10, the various gaps therein and the movable parts can be hermetically sealed inside a flexible container, for instance a nylon bag, to prevent the bonding agent from directly adhering to them. Air is removed from the bag so as to obtain a very tight fit between the bag and the system 10. The interior of the ski structure is finalized once the systems 10 are in position. The cavity inside which each system 10 is embedded can partially project inside the ski core, which ski core can be made for instance of wood. A longitudinal groove can be machined in the ski core 132 to receive a portion of the thickness of each system 10. This way, the systems 10 will be very close to the neutral axis of the ski 100.

The access port 106 can be created, once the ski 100 is fully assembled and properly cured, by machining the top sheet 134, the top face of the box 110 and any layer between them. If desired, the access port 106 can be closed by a removable protective cover to prevent ice, snow and debris from accumulating therein. The removable protective cover can be for instance a Velcro band.

In use, a skier can change the settings of one or both systems 10 by inserting a handheld tool through the access port 106. The access port 106 is configured and disposed so that the screw heads 44 can be independently rotated using the handheld tool.

FIG. 6 is an isometric exploded view illustrating another example of a camber adjustment system 10 for implementing the proposed concept. FIG. 7 is an isometric cut-away view of a portion of the system 10 shown in FIG. 6. This system 10 can include a first and a second blade 12, 16 made of a non-metallic material, for instance a composite material such as a carbon fiber reinforced polymer. In this example, the two blades 12, 16 were created using a same monolithic piece. The monolithic piece can be made using a plurality of laminating layers of fabric, for instance carbon fiber fabric layers coated with an epoxy resin, and by folding the piece in two to form the two blades 12, 16. The monolithic piece can be compressed and heated during the curing process to improve its mechanical properties. The threaded sleeve 40 can be treated for adhesion and embedded at the first end portion 16a of the second blade 16 between the layers of material prior to curing. A parting agent coated layer can be provided on one half of the piece prior to the folding so as to keep the mating surfaces of the blades 12, 16 separated from one another. A portion of the piece at the second end portions 12b, 16b can be left uncoated so as to create a bonded surface between the two blades 12, 16 and improving the strength of the connection. Still, a fastener such as a bolt or a rivet can be used instead or in addition to the fold or the bonded surface.

FIG. 8 is a top view illustrating another example of a system 10 for implementing the proposed concept. In FIG. 8, the system 10 is illustrated in a neutral state and FIG. 9 is a longitudinal side view thereof. This system 10 is a double-sided model. It comprises two opposite first blades 12 and a single second blade 16. Both first blades 12 have inward ends that are spaced apart from one another and between which is located the user-actuated mechanism 30. This mechanism 30 includes a cam 140 pivotally connected to the center of the second blade 16. The cam 140 pivots around an axle 142 that is generally orthogonal to the surface of the second blade 16. In the illustrated example, the cam 140 presses against inserts 144, made for instance of a hard plastic material, positioned between the periphery of the cam 140 and the ends of the first blades 12. In use, pivoting the cam 140 changes the distance between the opposite ends of the first blades 12, thereby changing their relative position with reference to the center of the second blade 16.

FIG. 10 is a top view of the system 10 shown in FIG. 8 when it is set in a cambered state. FIG. 11 is a longitudinal side view of the system 10 shown in FIG. 10.

FIGS. 12 and 13 are views similar to FIGS. 8 and 9 but show the system 10 in an upside down configuration. FIG. 12 shows the system 10 as viewed from the bottom. The system 10 is somewhat similar to that of FIGS. 8 to 11 but the axle 142 is provided with a connection hole 146 allowing the free end of a handheld tool to reach the adjustment mean of cam 140 and adjust its angular position. This system 10 cambers the opposite way compared to the one shown in FIGS. 8 to 11.

Depending on the design, the structure of the ski 100 can be preformed with a reverse (convex) camber and adjusted by one or more systems 10 to achieve a flat profile or a concave camber.

Alternately, the structure of the ski 100 can be preformed with a relatively flat profile or a slightly concave camber and adjusted by one or more systems 10 to increase its concave camber. In both cases, the systems 10 can also be configured upside-down and used indeed to increase the convex camber. For instance, FIG. 14 is a semi-schematic longitudinal side view illustrating an example of the ski profile when the systems 10 therein are in a neutral state (stippled lines) and when the systems 10 are in a cambered state (solid lines). In this example, the ski 100 has a concave undersurface profile when the systems 10 are in a cambered state.

FIG. 15 is an isometric view illustrating another example of a camber adjustment system 10 for implementing the proposed concept. The system 10 is illustrated in a neutral state. FIG. 16 is a longitudinal side view of the system 10 shown in FIG. 15. FIG. 17 is a top side view of the system 10 shown in FIG. 15. FIG. 18 is a longitudinal cross-section side view taken along lines 18-18 in FIG. 17. The axis N refers to the neutral axis of the snow-riding device.

The system 10 illustrated in FIGS. 15 to 18 comprises a first blade 12 and a second blade 16 having a tapered configuration. They are maintained in this position by an elongate spacer 150, for instance a spacer made of plastic, extending lengthwise over at least a portion of the blades 12, 16. The spacer 150 is not glued to the first blade 12 and to the second blade 16 so that the spacer 150 does not significantly interfere with their relative repositioning. The thickness of the spacer 150 varies along the longitudinal direction and is minimal near the second end portions 12b, 16b. The spaced configuration increases the efficiency of the mechanism 30 in cambering the blades 12, 16. Varying spacing between the blades 12, 16 in the lengthwise direction impacts the rigidity of the system 10 along this direction. The thicker sections of the system 10 will be more rigid therefore creating a greater bending force on the rest of the snow-riding device than thinner sections. The spacer 150 can therefore be made with such a profile as to induce a greater camber variation in a predetermined location of the snow-riding device.

The second end portions 12b, 16b are affixed together using two spaced-apart rivets 160 and the second end portions 12b, 16b are also glued together in this example, as explained later in the text.

The user-actuated mechanism 30 of the system 10 shown in FIGS. 15 to 18 is located at the first end portions 12a, 16a of both blades 12, 16. The mechanism 30 is enclosed in a plastic sealing unit 170. Also, the tips of the first and second blades 12, 16, at the first end portions 12a, 16a, are affixed together in this example. This is done using two spaced-apart rivets 180. The tips are also glued on either side of an elastic membrane provided to redistribute shear stresses within the glued joint and to redistribute tangential forces transferred to the structure, in this case towards the base of the snow-riding device.

As can be seen, the mechanism 30 is operated through a knob 200. The system 10 can be integrated to a snow-riding device in such a way that the knob 200 can transmit torque to a movable part inside the mechanism 30, thereby providing the user with a very convenient way of adjusting the camber of the snow-riding device without using a tool. Nevertheless, one can also operate the system 10 shown in FIGS. 15 to 18 using a tool.

FIG. 19 is an enlarged longitudinal cross-section side view of the user-actuated mechanism 30 shown in FIG. 18. As can be seen, the user-actuated mechanism 30 includes a rigid curved member 210 made of a highly resilient material that prevents the top section of the mechanism 30 from sagging as the mechanism 30 is tightened. With the rigid curved member 210, the first end portion 12a of the first blade 12 has an arcuate shape.

An enlarged base plate 220 is located underneath the second blade 16 and extends to both internal longitudinal walls of the sealing unit 170. A threaded shaft 230 extends inside the mechanism 30. The threaded shaft 230 passes through circular holes provided across the first blade 12 and the rigid curved member 210, and also through a registered hole provided across the second blade 16. Depending on the exact configuration, the threaded shaft 230 can be pre-assembled with the rest of the mechanism 30 prior to the molding of the snow-riding device or added at a later stage. In the illustrated example, the bottom end of the threaded shaft 230 engages a threaded hole 232 provided through the base plate 220. The threaded shaft 230 also includes a radially-projecting shoulder 234 positioned between the top side of the rigid curved member 210 and the bottom side of a captivation plate 240. This way, the threaded shaft 230 can only rotate on itself when the user rotates the knob 200.

It should be noted that alternative configurations are possible. For instance, the enlarged base plate 220 can be rigidly connected to the bottom end of the threaded shaft 230. In that case, the underside of the knob 200 can be provided with threaded hole to receive the top portion of the threaded shaft 230. A vertically-extending keyway 242 is provided on each vertical internal longitudinal side wall of the sealing unit 170 in order to prevent the base plate 20 from rotating.

FIG. 20 is an enlarged longitudinal cross-section side view taken along line 20-20 in FIG. 17. This figure shows that the two blades 12, 16 can be slightly spaced apart from one another at the second end portions 12b, 16b by an elastic membrane 250 glued in-between the mating ends of the blades 12, 16. The elastic membrane 250 helps redistributing the shear forces over a larger area and reduces the shear forces at the rivets 160. The resilient layer 250 also helps redistribute tangential force transferred to the structure, in this case towards the base of the snow-riding device, so as to mitigate potential local deformation that would be induced by a point load.

In use, rotating the knob 200 in one direction pulls the first end portion 16a of the second blade 16 towards the reinforcing plate 210. The traction pulls the second blade 16 to the left in the figures with reference to the first blade 12, thereby changing the camber of the system 10. The oblong shape of the hole in the second blade 16 yields space for this translation. FIG. 21 shows the system 10 in a fully cambered state. FIG. 22 is an enlarged view of the mechanism 30 of FIG. 21.

The system 10 includes a top annular bushing 260 and a bottom annular bushing 262. Both are made of a resilient material. The bushings 260, 262 are coaxially disposed with reference to the threaded shaft 230. They are positioned on the opposite sides of the shoulder 234. Different kinds of bottom bushings can be used so as to vary the dynamic response of the system 10. The bottom bushing 262 can also be useful in case of a sudden overload. For instance, such overload can occur if the snow-riding device is stopped abruptly into a deep hole in the snow. The bottom bushing 262 can mitigate the risks of stressing the blades 12, 16 beyond their elastic limit. The top bushing 260 is useful to prevent the upper part of the shoulder 234 from impacting on the captivation plate 240 as compression is released from the bottom bushing 262. Nevertheless, if desired, the bushings 260, 262 can also be omitted or used separately. The captivation plate 240 is provided atop of the snow-riding device to prevent the knob 200 from being removed accidentally. The knob 200 may be connected to the threaded shaft 230 using of a set screw (not shown). Other arrangements are also possible.

FIG. 23 is an isometric cut-away view illustrating the system 10 of FIG. 15 embedded inside an example of a ski structure. The ski structure includes different layers of materials. The illustrated example has a cap construction. Other types of construction such as a semi-cap and a side wall construction can also be used. In this example, a flexible bag 270, made for instance of plastic, is used to seal the system 10 and to prevent the blades 12, 16 to bind to the internal faces of the cavity. It is often desirable to position the medial plane of the systems 10, when they are in a neutral state, slightly above the neutral axis of the ski 100. The mechanism 30 is inserted into a longitudinal groove performed on top of the structure of the ski and sandwiched between two layers of fiberglass coated with a binding agent. As the two layers of fiberglass meet on each longitudinal side of the mechanism 30, a strong longitudinal bond is created. This provides a solid wrap to prevent separation of the blades 12, 16. An example of the use of the different layers of fiberglass is shown at 280.

As aforesaid, it is also possible to use the system 10 with a snow-riding device within the system 10 being embedded within its structure.

Overall, the proposed concept provided a very efficient way of adjusting the camber of a snow-riding device while minimizing the longitudinal stresses in a snow-riding device.

The present detailed description and the appended figures are meant to be exemplary only, and a skilled person will recognize that variants can be made in light of a review of the present disclosure without departing from the proposed concept.

Claims

1. A camber adjustment system for use with a snow-riding device, the system comprising:

a first elongate blade extending along a first longitudinal axis, the first blade having opposite first and second end portions;
a second elongate blade extending along a second longitudinal axis and being substantially in superposition with reference to the first blade, the second blade having opposite first and second end portions, the second end portion of the second blade being affixed to the second end portion of the first blade; and
a user-actuated mechanism connected to the first and second blades, the mechanism being selectively operable by a user of the snow-riding device to longitudinally reposition at least a portion of the second blade with reference to the first blade, thereby modifying the camber of the system;
whereby the system is self-contained and once integrated to the snow-riding device, the system permits a selective camber adjustment of at least a portion of the snow-riding device upon modifying the camber of the system.

2. (canceled)

3. The system as defined in claim 1, wherein the user-actuated mechanism comprises a screw having one end engaged to a threaded sleeve connected to the first end portion of the second blade, the screw extending substantially parallel to at least a portion of the second longitudinal axis and being coupled to an end member engagable against the first end portion of the first blade.

4. The system as defined in claim 3, wherein the first end portion of the second blade includes an end face spaced apart from the end member when the system is in a neutral state, the end face of the first end portion of the second blade engaging the end member when the system has a maximum camber.

5. (canceled)

6. The system as defined in claim 1, wherein the user-actuated mechanism comprises a pulling member movable along a direction that is substantially perpendicular to the second longitudinal axis, the pulling member engaging the first end portion of the second blade.

7. The system as defined in claim 6, wherein the pulling member is threadably engaged to a threaded shaft extending through the first and the second blade.

8. The system as defined in claim 7, wherein the first blade includes a hole across which the threaded shaft extends, the threaded shaft having a free end projecting above a top side of the first blade and to which is connected a knob, the knob being in a torque-transmitting engagement with the threaded shaft.

9. The system as defined in claim 8, wherein the threaded shaft includes a radially-projecting shoulder located under a captivation plate, the captivation plate including a hole through which project a top portion of the threaded shaft.

10. The system as defined in claim 9, further comprising a resilient annular bushing positioned under a radially-projecting shoulder, the bushing being coaxial with the threaded shaft.

11. The system as defined in claim 6, wherein the mechanism further comprises a rigid curved member positioned between the first end portion of the first blade and the first end portion of the second blade, the curved member creating a space between the first and second blades when the system is in a neutral state.

12. The system as defined in claim 1, wherein the first blade and the second blade have a tapered configuration with reference to the first and second longitudinal axes.

13. The system as defined in claim 1, further comprising an elongate spacer provided between at least a portion of the first and second blades.

14. (canceled)

15. (canceled)

16. The system as defined in claim 1, wherein the snow-riding device is selected from a group consisting of alpine skis, cross-country skis, snowboards, telemark skis and skate ski blades.

17. A method for adjusting a camber of at least one portion of a snow-riding device, the method comprising:

integrating a self-contained camber adjusting system to the snow-riding device, the camber adjusting system including a first and a second elongate blade facing each other and connected at a common end;
selectively repositioning at least a portion of the first blade with reference to the second blade to change a camber of the system; and
during the repositioning, transmitting the change in the camber of the system to the at least one portion of the snow-riding device, thereby adjusting its camber.

18. The method as defined in claim 17, wherein the step of selectively repositioning at least a portion of the first blade with reference to the second blade includes having a user engaging the system with a handheld tool and pivoting the tool to change the camber of the system.

19. The method as defined in claim 18, wherein the handheld tool is inserted in an access port made through the top surface of the snow-riding device.

20. The method as defined in claim 19, wherein the step of selectively repositioning at least a portion of the first blade with reference to the second blade includes removing a protective cover from the access port prior to inserted the handheld tool therein.

21. The method as defined in claim 17, wherein the step of selectively repositioning at least a portion of the first blade with reference to the second blade includes having a user pivoting a knob positioned adjacent to a top surface of the snow-riding device to change the camber of the system.

22. The method as defined in claim 17, wherein the step of integrating the system to the snow-riding device includes permanently embedding the system inside a cavity created within the structure when manufacturing the snow-riding device.

23. The method as defined in claim 22, wherein embedding the system includes preventing the system from directly adhering to the structure.

24. (canceled)

25. The method as defined in claim 22, wherein after embedding the system, a top surface of the snow-riding device is machined to create an access port.

26. (canceled)

Patent History

Publication number: 20110233900
Type: Application
Filed: Nov 27, 2009
Publication Date: Sep 29, 2011
Inventor: Michel-Olivier Huard (Saint-Ferreol-les-Neiges)
Application Number: 13/131,273

Classifications

Current U.S. Class: With Camber Or Flexibility Control (280/602)
International Classification: A63C 5/044 (20060101);