SELF-ADJUSTING SYSTEM FOR JOINT PROTECTION

A self-adjusting system for joint protection comprising a joint protector pad aligned relative to a joint and disposable between an operative orientation and a spaced orientation in relation thereto. A first attachment assembly of at least one elongate strap connects the joint protector to a foot or hand of the wearer, and a second attachment assembly of an elongate strap(s) connecting the joint protector to a point near the torso of the wearer, such as a waistband or belt. In a spaced orientation when the joint is straight, the joint protector is spaced apart from the joint so as not to impede movement. In an operative orientation when the joint is flexed, the joint protector at least partially covers the joint, supporting and protecting it from the underlying surface. The strap(s) ensure the joint protector is automatically properly aligned in moving between the spaced and operative orientation.

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Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to pads, and more specifically, to pads for covering joint(s) such as knee pads or elbow pads, to protect and cushion the same.

2. Description of the Related Art

Pads have been used for decades to cushion the joint of a wearer, such as a knee or elbow on which pressure may be placed during certain activities. For instance, knee pads are commonly used in construction and gardening, and other activities involving kneeling for a prolonged period of time, to reduce pain and alleviate pressure applied to the joint that could otherwise damage the joint. Knee and elbow pads also are employed during sporting activities, such as cycling and skating, to protect the joints from cuts, abrasions, and impact damage that often accompanies sports in which the joints may be scraped, bumped, or take the brunt of a fall. They often protect not just the skin, but the bone, cartilage, and ligaments of the joint as well.

For all their virtues, joint pads still suffer from some major drawbacks. Most joint pads have straps that wrap around the limb of a wearer, such as a leg in the case of a knee pad, to secure the pad in position relative to the protected joint. There are often straps on both sides of the joint, so that the pad does not drift from position during movement. To ensure the pad remains in position, however, these straps are often pulled tightly around the leg or arm of the wearer. This is not only uncomfortable for the wearer, pinching and squeezing the thigh, calf, or arm, but in extreme cases may impede circulation through the limb and affect dexterity. Moreover, straps wrapped around the leg or arm of the wearer will often rub against the skin, irritating and chafing the skin of the wearer the longer the pad is employed. Such irritation occurs whether the pad and straps are applied directly to the skin or over clothing. This irritation is often worse along compressed areas, such as the back of the knee or inner arm, since these areas are subject to increased pressure, higher temperatures, and perspiration during use, such as when the joint is flexed, which only aggravates the irritation. In extreme cases, the irritation and chafing may lead to blistering and even bleeding.

These disadvantages are compounded over time, such that while brief use may be tolerable, longer use such as for hours or even days, can have a debilitating effect and may not be tolerable at all. Indeed, the discomfort from irritation and chafing over prolonged use of a joint pad may eclipse the pain or pressure to the joint without the use of the pad, and some users will forgo use of a joint pad after a time as a result of these debilitating side effects.

Other known joint protection pads clip to clothing to secure the pad in place. These too, however, often wrap around and/or squeeze the attendant limb, thereby suffering the same drawbacks as discussed above. Moreover, the clips are subject to easily disengage when the pad is hit or impacted, and so are not effective in keeping the pad in position to properly cover and protect the joint.

Regardless of how joint protector pads are secured to a wearer, they all shift out of position over time during use, and must be repositioned. This often involves manually moving, shifting, or repositioning the pad and/or straps to return them to their original position. Such repositioning therefore requires the wearer to stop what they are doing to see to the pad and straps, interrupting their activity. Moreover, a shifted pad and/or strap distracts the wearer from their activity until repositioned, which can be significant amount of time until it is convenient to take a break. In some instances, such as in war or on patrol, waiting for a convenient time is not an option, nor is distraction.

It is therefore evident that a better form of joint protector pad is needed to properly protect the joint of a wearer without causing damage or irritation to the wearer. A pad that can be worn for long periods of time would also be beneficial, as would a pad that does not need to be repositioned periodically.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a system for protecting a joint of a wearer, such as a hinge joint of a knee or elbow. The system provides a joint protector pad to protect, cushion, and/or support a joint in an operative orientation, when the joint is flexed or bent. In a spaced orientation, when the joint is straight, the joint protecting pad is spaced apart or free-floating from the joint, not attached or secured to the limb of the wearer. Rather than having straps that wrap around the leg or arm, the present system includes a set of straps that extend outwardly from the joint protector pad in opposite directions and attach to the wearer at the foot or arm, in one direction, and the torso in the opposite direction.

The joint protector pad is therefore always properly aligned so that when the joint is flexed, the protector pad goes directly into contact with the joint automatically. When the joint is straightened, the straps automatically pull the joint protector pad back into spaced aligned relation to the joint, without any need to manually manipulate the pad or straps. Accordingly, the joint protector pad is always ready and in proper alignment for protecting the joint, and yet is not inhibiting to the joint. The present system eliminates the need for strangulating straps to keep the joint in place, freeing the joint for increased movement without sacrificing protection, and saving the surrounding skin and tissue from irritation and damage. It is also self-adjusting, abolishing the need to manually reposition the pad or straps.

Specifically, the system includes a joint protector aligned with a joint to protect the same. The joint protector may be any type of protection or pad, and may include impact resistant material or frictional material on the outer surface, and cushioning material on the inner surface. A first attachment assembly including one or more straps extends from the joint protector to the extremity, such as a foot or hand, and attaches thereto, such as by loop and/or clips or other attachment member(s). A second attachment assembly includes one or more straps extending from an opposite side of the joint protector, securing at the torso of the wearer, such as at the waistband or belt loops. In at least one embodiment, the straps of the attachment assemblies are slightly elastic, such that they are taut even in the spaced orientation, but remain capable of stretching, such as in the operative orientation. Each strap is also adjustable to accommodate any size or height of the wearer.

These and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become clearer when the drawings as well as the detailed description are taken into consideration.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a fuller understanding of the nature of the present invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of one embodiment of the present system, showing the outer face thereof.

FIG. 2 is a schematic representation of another embodiment of the present system, showing the outer face thereof.

FIG. 3 is a schematic representation of the present system as employed on a leg of a wearer, shown in the operative orientation from the side.

FIG. 4 is a schematic representation of the present system as employed on a leg of a wearer, shown in the spaced orientation, shown from the side.

Like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The present invention is directed to a system for protecting a joint of a wearer, such as a hinge joint of a knee or elbow. The system may be employed by a person during any activity in which joint protection is desired, or when potential damage to the joint from impact or pressure may occur. Examples include, but are not limited to: construction such as welding, roofing, and floor work; gardening; sports, such as skateboarding, cycling, and skiing; and military activities including patrols, transport, missions, operations, enemy engagement, and even battle.

The present system aligns a joint protector pad with the joint to be protected in a free-floating, uninhibited manner, such that the wearer has the same freedom of motion he or she would have were they not wearing the joint protector system. The limbs of the wearer are not squeezed, pinched, or constrained in any way. When the need arises to kneel or land on a knee or elbow, for example, the joint is flexed. As the joint flexes, and in the same amount of time it takes to perform this action, the system moves into an operative orientation to automatically position the joint protector to cover and protect the joint, without manual manipulation on the part of the wearer. As soon as the joint is straightened or extended, the joint protector pulls away from the joint and into a spaced orientation, once again not impeding limb movement, and is automatically aligned in spaced apart relation with the joint as before and without manual manipulation. Accordingly, the present system is a “self-adjusting” system.

Specifically, and as shown throughout the Figures, the present invention is a system 100 for protecting the joint of a wearer. Any joint may be protected by the present system, but in at least one embodiment the system is particularly useful in protecting joints, such as the knee or elbow, which flex by bending in one direction. To provide context to the invention, and for illustrative purposes only, FIGS. 3 and 4 show the system 100 used with a knee, although it should be understood that the Figures and description herein should not be construed in a limited manner. Moreover, it should similarly be clearly understood that neither the wearer, nor any body part such as joints, are the subject of this invention or are part of the claimed invention, but rather are discussed and illustrated herein merely to provide context to the system of the present invention.

As shown throughout the Figures, the system 100 includes at least one joint protector 110, structured to accommodate a joint which it is to protect. For instance, the joint protector 110 may be any size or shape appropriate to receive, fit, cover and/or conform to the shape of various joints, such as knee or elbow. In a preferred embodiment, the joint protector 110 is a pad or other similar structure, and may be multi-use or for a dedicated purpose. One embodiment of a joint protector is shown in FIG. 1, and another shown in FIG. 2, illustrating that the joint protector 110 may comprise any form or shape. The joint protector 110 may be made of any suitable material, such as hard plastic, polymer, rubber, or silicone based materials, gels, textiles, etc., or any combination thereof. For example, the joint protector 110 may include a base made of a rigid material and a plurality of additional portions made of a separate material.

In at least one embodiment, the joint protector 110 also includes an impact resistant portion(s) 112 disposed on an outer surface thereof, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. These impact resistant portion(s) 112 serve to reduce the force applied to the joint from a supporting surface 10, as illustrated in FIG. 3 showing the example of a knee joint protected by the system 100 when kneeling on a surface 10 such as the ground or floor. The impact resistant portion(s) 112 protect the joint from damage, such as from impact or contact, from the supporting surface 10 and objects thereon. For instance, if a soldier needs to quickly fall to a knee to take aim and fire while in the field, or assist a fellow soldier, the impact resistant portion 112 of the joint protector 110 protects his/her knee from rocks, glass, debris, and other objects on the ground that could harm the knee joint or distract the wearer. Moreover, there may be one impact resistant portion 112 to each joint protector, as seen in FIG. 2, or there may be multiple impact resistant portions 112 disposed across an outer surface of the joint protector, as shown in FIG. 1, in any pattern or array thereon. The impact resistant portion(s) 112 may be made from any suitable material, such as hard plastic or polymers, but in at least one embodiment is contemplated to be of a harder or sturdier material than the joint protector 110.

In at least one embodiment, the joint protector 110 includes at least one cushioning portion 114 (not shown) disposed on an inner surface of the joint protector 110. The cushioning portion(s) 114 is structured to support the joint in a flexed position and to provide relief from pressure applied to the joint. For example, the cushioning portion(s) 114 can be particularly useful to provide a measure of comfort to the wearer when employing the system 100 over an extended or prolonged period of time, such as when kneeling for hours while gardening or laying down flooring. Accordingly, the cushioning portion(s) 114 is made of any material suitable for absorbing pressure, such as pliable, resilient, and/or conforming material, and may be soft to the touch as well. Non-limiting examples include gels, foams, batting, microbeads, cloth, etc. or combinations thereof.

In some embodiments, the joint protector 110 also includes at least one frictional portion 116 disposed on a surface of the joint protector 110, and are structured to increase friction between the joint protector 110 and a supporting surface 10 or joint of the wearer. For instance, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the frictional portion(s) 114 may be disposed on an outer surface of the joint protector 110, and may be its own separate section or may coincide with another portion of the joint protector 110. The frictional portion(s) 116 are structured to increase friction, and therefore reduce slippage, of the joint protector 110 along a supporting surface 10 when disposed on the outer surface of the joint protector 100, such as in FIG. 3. Accordingly, the frictional portion(s) 116 may assist the wearer in maintaining position once the joint (knee or elbow) has made contact with a support surface 10, such as the ground. Frictional portion(s) 116 may also be disposed on an inner surface (not shown) of the joint protector 110, and be structured to increase friction, thereby reducing or limiting slippage of the joint within the joint protector 110 when they are in contact in an operative orientation, such as depicted in FIG. 3.

The joint protector 110 is disposable in aligned relation to the joint 12. When the joint 12 is fully extended, as in a spaced orientation depicted in FIG. 4, the joint protector 110 is aligned but disposed in spaced apart relation to the joint 12, such that the joint protector 110 is free-floating, meaning not in contact with the joint 12. When the joint 12 flexes, such as in an operative orientation illustrated in FIG. 3, the joint protector 110 is disposed in aligned and at least partially covering relation to the joint 12. Moreover, the joint protector 110 is in contact with the joint and at least partially supporting the joint in an operative orientation.

The system 100 of the present invention also includes a first attachment assembly 120 connected to one side of the joint protector 110, and a second attachment assembly 130 connected to a different, preferably opposite side of the joint protector 110, as shown throughout the Figures. More in particular, the first attachment assembly 120 comprises at least one strap 122 connecting to the joint protector 110 at its proximal end 124. As depicted in the embodiment of FIG. 1, the strap(s) 122 connect to the joint protector 110 by at least one attachment member 128, which may be snaps, hooks, loops, ties, buttons, clips, alligator clips, or other suitable structure for removably but securely fastening one item to another. Moreover, the attachment member(s) 128 may allow for adjustment of the length and/or positioning of the strap(s) 122, such as by a plurality of holes, hooks, or snaps that could be used to effectively lengthen or shorten the strap(s) 122 at the proximal end 124. In other embodiments, such as depicted in FIG. 2, the strap(s) 122 connect to the joint protector 110 in a variety or combination of ways, including by an attachment member 128 as described above, and/or by securely and non-removably fastening to the joint protector 110, such as by being sewn, glued, molded, melded, woven, or other methods of non-removable or permanent attachment thereto. Moreover, each strap 122 may attach in a different way, and in the case of a single strap 122 attaching twice (as in FIG. 2), can even be attached different ways at each attachment point.

As noted previously, the first attachment assembly 120 includes at least one strap 122. In some embodiments, as in FIG. 1, the first attachment assembly 120 includes a plurality of straps 122. In other embodiments, as in FIG. 2, a single strap 122 is used. Regardless of the number of straps 122, they each extend from the proximal end 124 at the joint protector 110 to a distal end 126 which is securable to a limb extremity of the wearer. As should be evident, as used herein “proximal” refers to closer to the joint protector 110 and “distal” means further from the joint protector 110. A limb extremity is a foot or hand, which bears repeating are not intended to be part of the invention but is provided for context.

The first attachment assembly 120 secures at the distal end 126 directly to the body of the wearer, such as feet or hands, or may secure to items of apparel such as clothing, boots, gloves, sleeves, pants, or other item being worn by the wearer at a position that is disposed at, near, or in the close vicinity of the limb extremity of the wearer. For example, in at least one embodiment the distal end 126 of the first attachment assembly 120 is structured and disposable in at least partially surrounding or encircling relation to a limb extremity, such as a foot or hand, or portion thereof. By way of example, FIGS. 3 and 4 show the distal end 126 of the first attachment assembly 120 configured as a harness that wraps around the arch of the foot, although it could just as easily be positioned over the ball or heel of the foot. A shoe can easily be worn over the system 100 with the distal end 126 in place, thereby further ensuring the strap 122 is securely in place and not likely to slip out. Of course, the strap 122 and distal end 126 thereof may be positioned outside the shoe in other embodiments. Similarly, in the case of elbow protectors, the distal end 126 of the strap 122 may be secured around the palm and/or heel of the hand, or a finger(s), and can be placed inside or outside a glove, if worn.

In some embodiments, such as shown in FIG. 1, the distal end 126 of the first attachment assembly 120 may also include at least one attachment member 128 as previously described, such as a clip, alligator clip, snap, button, tie, etc. for securely, yet removably, attaching the distal end 126 at or near the foot or hand of the wearer. For instance, the attachment member 128 may snap, clip, or otherwise securely fasten to a boot, pant leg, sock, hem, glove, sleeve, or other apparel worn at or near the foot or hand. This adds another level of security to ensure the first attachment assembly 120 stays in place was positioned and secured at the distal end 126.

Similarly, the second attachment assembly 130 comprises at least one strap 132 and connects to the joint protector 110 at a proximal end 134. In at least one embodiment, the second attachment assembly 130 includes a plurality of straps 132. For instance, in the embodiment of FIG. 2, the second attachment assembly 130 includes two straps 132. In some embodiments, such as in FIG. 1, the second attachment assembly 130 includes three straps 132, for use in applications where additional sturdiness is needed, such as sports or military applications. As previously discussed, the strap(s) 132 may connect to the joint protector 110 at a number of locations, but are preferably oppositely disposed from the first attachment assembly. The strap(s) 132 may employ the use of an attachment member 128 as previously described and shown in FIG. 1, or may be permanently attached thereto as previously described and shown in FIG. 2, or combinations thereof. Each strap 132 may also be adjustable along its length and/or at the attachment member 128. Moreover, in embodiments such as FIG. 1 in which attachment member(s) 128 secure the strap(s) 132 to the joint protector 110, such attachment may allow for movement, such as rotational movement about the attachment member 128. Accordingly, each of the strap(s) 128 may be independently at least partially moveable, as indicated by the arrows, so as to permit or accommodate various positioning, placement, and to some degree movement of the wearer when secured.

The second attachment assembly 130, and strap(s) 132 thereof, extend from their attachment at the proximal end 134 at the joint protector 110 to a distal end 136 which is securable at or near the torso of the wearer. As used herein, torso refers to the trunk of a subject, which excludes the arms, legs, and head, and is also not part of the claimed invention. Accordingly, in at least one embodiment the second attachment assembly 130 secures to the waist of the wearer, such as depicted in FIG. 4. Of course, this is not the only configuration possible. For instance, the second attachment assembly 130 connects to the wearer at the shoulders or back other embodiments.

The second attachment assembly 130 may also include at least one attachment member 128, as previously described, disposed at a distal end 136 of each strap(s) 132 to secure the strap(s) 132 directly to the body of the wearer, or to items of apparel such as clothing, shirts, pants, waistband, belt loop, belt, jacket or other item being worn by the wearer at a position that is disposed at, near, or in the vicinity the torso of the wearer. By way of example, FIG. 4 shows the attachment members 128 securing the straps 132 to the waistband of the wearer. Belt loops and belts are also useful attachment points.

As is evident from the Figures, the straps 122, 132 are elongate so as to extend from the joint protector 110 to the distal end 126, 136 located at a foot, hand, or torso of the wearer, respectively. Moreover, the straps 122, 132 do not wrap around and tighten down onto a limb of the wearer, such as a leg or arm, as straps in currently known knee and elbow pads do. Accordingly, because the straps 122, 132 follow along one face or side of a limb (as shown in FIG. 4 as one example), rather than wrapping around the limb, they do not inhibit movement of the limbs or the joint.

In addition, in at least one embodiment the straps 122, 132 are made of an at least partially elastic material capable of slight stretching. Accordingly, when the system 100 is disposed in a spaced orientation, as shown in FIG. 4, the straps 122, 132 are slightly taut so as to maintain alignment of the joint protector 110 with the corresponding joint. However, they are loose enough to enable further movement, such as stretching necessary to transition to an operative orientation, as shown in FIG. 3. In this manner, the straps 122, 132 act similarly to tendons. They are also loose enough that, should the joint protector 110 be impacted from the side, such as if caught on a wall, corner, or knocked against an object in passing, the joint protector 110 absorbs the force of the impact, and the straps 122, 132 also absorb some of the impact, allowing the joint protector 110 to move to the side, thereby translating that energy away from the joint.

Moreover, the straps 122, 132 are also sufficiently resilient such that as soon as the impacting force is no longer applied, the straps 122, 132 quickly return to their original position, along with the attached joint protector 110. Similarly, the resilient characteristic of the straps 122, 132 enable them and the connected joint protector 110 to automatically fall back into aligned relation to the joint when moving between an operative and spaced orientation, and vice versa. Accordingly, the straps 122, 132 may be of any material suitable for providing taut, accurate positioning yet flexibility and resiliency. Examples include, but are not limited to, textiles, woven textiles, natural or synthetic materials, blends, elastics, rubber, polymer-based materials, bungee type materials, and combinations thereof, and may be fortified with chemical or material agents such as to increase strength, resiliency, elasticity, resistance to the elements such as water, etc. Due in part to the elasticity and resiliency of the straps 122, 132 and the positioning and connection of the straps 122, 132 with the joint protector 110 and attachment to the wearer, the present system 100 is referred to as a “self-adjusting” system, requiring no manual manipulation or adjustment once it is initially placed and attached to the wearer.

Moreover, each of the straps 122, 132 is adjustable in length independently of the other straps 122, 132 so as to accommodate any of a range of sizes of a wearer. For example, the straps 122, 132 are adjustable so that the system 100 may be used by a person of any height, including short people (such as under five feet tall) and tall people (such as over six feet tall). The system 100 may also be used by children or adults. The length of each strap 122, 132 may be adjusted by sliding, Velcro®, hooks, buttons, snaps, tying, and any other suitable means of lengthening or shortening. The straps 122 are also separately adjustable from the straps 132, to accommodate for varying lengths of limbs in a wearer.

In at least one embodiment, the system 100 also includes a limb protector disposed adjacent to the joint protector 110 and disposable in aligned relation to at least a portion of a limb of the wearer, so as to protect the portion of the limb in a manner similar to the joint protector 110. For example, the limb protector is disposable in covering relation to a portion of a thigh, shin, forearm, upper arm, or other portion of a limb adjacent to the joint being protected by the instant system 100. In one embodiment, the limb protector is an extension of the joint protector 110, and may be considered the same structure. In other embodiments, the limb protector is adjacent but connected to the joint protector 110, and may be hingedly connected thereto so as to allow for movement and flexion of the joint.

The present invention is amenable to various configurations. For instance, in some embodiments multiple systems 100 may be used in tandem, on different joints, such as a separate system 100 on each knee or each elbow. In at least one of these tandem embodiments, such as when one system 100 is employed over one elbow and another system 100′ is employed over the other elbow, the first attachment assembly 120 of each system 100, 100′ secures at or near the respective hand of the wearer, and the distal end 136 of the second attachment assembly 130 of one system 100 secures to the distal end 136′ of the second attachment assembly 130′ of the second system 100′. Accordingly, the distal ends 136, 136′ of the second attachment systems 130, 130′ meet and connect to each other at the back or shoulders of the person, even if they do not also attach to the person. In embodiments covering the knees, the distal ends 126, 126′ of the second attachment assemblies 120, 120′ may meet and connect at the shoulders, chest, or behind the neck. In still other embodiments, a single system 100 includes two joint protectors 110, each having its own first attachment assembly 120 to connect to the foot or hand, but sharing a common second attachment assembly 130, which may stretch over the back, shoulders, neck, or other part of the wearer.

Since many modifications, variations and changes in detail can be made to the described preferred embodiment of the invention, it is intended that all matters in the foregoing description and shown in the accompanying drawings be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense. Thus, the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents.

Now that the invention has been described,

Claims

1. A system for protecting a joint of a wearer, comprising:

at least one joint protector disposable in aligned relation to a joint of the wearer between an operative orientation and a spaced orientation,
a first attachment assembly comprising at least one strap connected to said joint protector at a proximal end and securable at a limb extremity at a distal end, and
a second attachment assembly comprising at least one strap connected to said joint protector at a proximal end and securable at a torso of the wearer at the distal end.

2. The system as recited in claim 1 wherein said operative orientation is defined as at least partially covering the joint of the wearer when the joint is at least partially flexed.

3. The system as recited in claim 1 wherein said spaced orientation is defined as disposed in spaced apart relation to the joint of the wearer when the joint is straightened.

4. The system as recited in claim 1 wherein said first attachment assembly is securable to a foot of the wearer at said distal end.

5. The system as recited in claim 1 wherein said first attachment assembly is securable to apparel of the wearer at said distal end.

6. The system as recited in claim 1 wherein said second attachment assembly is securable at a torso of the wearer at said distal end.

7. The system as recited in claim 1 wherein said second attachment assembly securable to apparel of the wearer at said distal end.

8. The system as recited in claim 1 wherein each of said at least one strap is adjustable.

9. The system as recited in claim 1 wherein each of said at least one strap comprises at least partially elastic qualities.

10. A system for self-adjusting joint protection of a wearer, comprising:

at least one joint protector disposable in aligned relation to a joint of the wearer in aligned relation to a joint of the wearer between an operative orientation and a spaced orientation,
a first attachment assembly comprising at least one elongate strap connected to said at least joint protector at a proximal end and extending distally therefrom,
said at least one elongate strap of said first attachment assembly securable at a limb extremity at a distal end thereof,
a second attachment assembly comprising at least one elongate strap connected to said at least one joint protector at a proximal end and extending distally therefrom,
said at least one elongate strap of said second attachment assembly securable at a torso of the wearer at the distal end thereof,
said joint protector is automatically positionable in relation to the joint of the wearer when moving between said spaced orientation and said operative orientation.

11. The system as recited in claim 10 wherein said at least one elongate strap of said first attachment assembly is disposable in at least partially surrounding relation to a foot of the wearer, or portion thereof.

12. The system as recited in claim 10 wherein said first attachment assembly further comprises at least one attachment member disposed in securing relation of said at least one elongate strap to apparel of the wearer at said distal end.

13. The system as recited in claim 10 wherein second attachment assembly further comprises at least one attachment member disposed in securing relation of said at least one elongate strap to apparel of the wearer at said distal end.

14. The system as recited in claim 10 wherein said second attachment assembly comprises a plurality of elongate straps each attached to said joint protector and extending distally therefrom.

15. The system as recited in claim 10 wherein each of said at least one strap of said first attachment assembly and said at least one strap of said second attachment assembly are adjustable.

16. The system as recited in claim 10 wherein each of said at least one strap of said first attachment assembly and said at least one strap of said second attachment assembly comprise at least partially elastic material.

17. The system as recited in claim 10 wherein said joint protector comprises at least one cushioning portion disposed on an inner surface of said joint protector and structured to provide relief from pressure applied to the joint in a flexed position.

18. The system as recited in claim 10 wherein said joint protector comprises at least one impact resistant portion disposed on an outer surface of said joint protector structured to reduce force applied to the joint from a supporting surface.

19. The system as recited in claim 10 wherein said joint protector comprises at least one frictional portion disposed on an outer surface of said joint protector and structured to increase friction between said joint protector and a supporting surface, or disposed on an inner surface of said joint protector and structured to increase friction between said joint protector and the joint of the wearer.

Patent History

Publication number: 20140208490
Type: Application
Filed: Jan 28, 2013
Publication Date: Jul 31, 2014
Inventor: Oscar Freixas (Miami, FL)
Application Number: 13/751,566

Classifications

Current U.S. Class: Guard Or Protector (2/455)
International Classification: A41D 13/015 (20060101);