GRADING AND SCREEDING DEVICE

Implementations of a grading and screeding device are provided. In some implementations, the grading and screeding device may be used to level and smooth uncured concrete. In some implementations, the grading and screeding device may be used to grade a surface prior to the pouring of uncured concrete. In some implementations, the grading and screeding device may be comprised of a screed having a front side and a back side, one or more stabilizing members extending from the back side of the screed, a frame, a front wheel and two rear wheels attached to the frame, and a plurality of stabilizers configured to receive the stabilizing members therein to stabilize the screed. In some implementations, the screed may be positioned and operably secured to the frame between the front wheel and rear wheels of the grading and screeding device.

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Description

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Patent Application Ser. No. 61/828,386, which was filed on May 29, 2013, and is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

TECHNICAL FIELD

This disclosure relates to implementations of a grading and screeding device.

BACKGROUND

Concrete has been relied upon as building material for many years due to its structural properties, availability, and cost relative to other material options. Uncured concrete is initially leveled through a process known as screeding which creates a generally level top surface. To smooth the top surface of the uncured concrete, workers often use a second process known as “floating” to cause the aggregate within the concrete to settle away from the upper surface leaving it smooth and aesthetically appealing. If performed by hand, screeding and “floating” concrete are very labor intensive processes.

U.S. Pat. Nos. 7,850,396 (“'396 patent”) discloses a wheeled screeding device. The wheeled screeding device is comprised of a support frame having a front end on which a screed is mounted and a back end where two wheels are rotatably mounted. The '396 patent teaches that the screed head may be pilotable and include a vibrating member used to establish a desired grade or level of the uncured concrete.

However, the wheeled screeding device disclosed in the '396 patent has several disadvantages. First, having mounting wheels on only one side of the frame makes the device less stable and more likely to wobble back and forth relative to the direction of travel. This could result in the screed leaving an uneven/non-level top layer of concrete. Second, the frame of the wheeled screeding device does not prevent the unintentional forward-backward movement of the screed if the screed encounters a bump or other impediment within the concrete.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates a side view of the grading and screeding device according to the present disclosure.

FIG. 2 illustrates a top view of the grading and screeding device according to the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Implementations of a grading and screeding device are provided. In some implementations, the grading and screeding device may be used to level and smooth uncured concrete. In some implementations, the grading and screeding device may be used to grade a surface prior to the pouring of uncured concrete.

In some implementations, the grading and screeding device may be comprised of a screed having a front side and a back side, one or more stabilizing members extending from the back side of the screed, a frame, a front wheel and two rear wheels attached to the frame, and a plurality of stabilizers configured to receive the stabilizing members therein to stabilize the screed.

In some implementations, the screed may be positioned and operably secured to the frame between the front wheel and rear wheels of the grading and screeding device. In this way, the screed may be stabilized and the unintentional forward-backward movement thereof reduced or eliminated.

In some implementations, each stabilizer is comprised of two protruding members spaced apart that extend horizontally from the frame to receive the stabilizing members. In some implementations, the protruding members of each stabilizer form a guide groove therebetween configured to receive width-wise and guide a stabilizing member. In some implementations, the distance between the protruding members of a stabilizer is configured to control the back and forth movement of a stabilizing member. In some implementations, the distance between the protruding members of a stabilizer maybe of sufficient width to allow the unimpeded or relatively unimpeded up-down movement of the stabilizing members of the screed during operation but minimize the back and forth movement of a stabilizing members.

FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate an example implementation of a grading and screeding device 100 according to the principles of the present disclosure.

In some implementations, the grading and screeding device 100 may be comprised of a screed 115 having a front side 115a and a back side 115b, one or more stabilizing members (e.g., stabilizing members 112a,b) extending from the back side 115b of the screed 115, a frame 105, a front wheel 109 and two rear wheels 107 attached to the frame, and a plurality of stabilizers 114 configured to receive the stabilizing members 112 therein to stabilize the screed 115. In some implementations, the plurality of stabilizers 114 may extend from the frame 105.

In some implementations, the screed 115 may have secured thereto one or more laser receivers 150 attached the screed 115 via a mast wherein the laser receivers 150 are in communication with a laser control box 152. In this way, the relative height of the screed 115 from the ground may be adjusted based on information received by the laser receiver 150 and processed by the laser control box 152 in a manner well known to those of ordinary skill in the art.

In some implementations, one or more hydraulic cylinders 148 may be operably attached to the frame 105 and the screed 115. In some implementations, the elevation of the screed 115 may be adjusted by the hydraulic cylinder(s) 148 based on input received from the laser receiver(s) 150 and processed by the laser control box 152 as is known to those of ordinary skill in the art. In some implementations, the elevation of the screed 115 may be adjusted by the hydraulic cylinder(s) 148 based on manual controls actuated by an operator of the grading and screeding device 100.

In some implementations, two spaced apart hydraulic cylinders 148 may be operably secured to the frame 105 (see, e.g., FIG. 2). In some implementations, less than two or more than two hydraulic cylinders 148 may be secured to the frame 105.

In some implementations, the hydraulic cylinders 148 may be operably secured on opposite sides of the screed 115, respectively, (see, e.g., FIG. 2) and, in some implementations, are an equidistant from the respective ends of the screed 115. In some implementations, the screed 115 may be removably secured to the hydraulic cylinders 148.

In some implementations, as shown in FIG. 2, the frame 105 may have a front end 101, a back end 103, a first lateral side 102 (left), and a second lateral side 104 (right).

In some implementations, a front wheel 109 may be operably connected to the front end 101 of the frame 105. One of ordinary skill art would know how to operably connect the front wheel 109 to the frame 105. In some implementations, the front wheel 109 may be removably connected to the frame 105. In this way, the front wheel 109 may be removed so that a trailer hitch adaptor 160 (discussed in detail below) may be secured to the frame 105 so that the grading and screeding device 100 may be towed by a tractor or other device equipped with a trailer hitch.

In some implementations, the front wheel 109 may pivot side-to-side (e.g., the front wheel can turn side-to-side). In some implementations, the front wheel 109 may turn about a 360° axis. In some implementations, the front wheel 109 may be positioned on or about a midway point relative to the width of the frame 105 (see, e.g., FIG. 2). In this way, for example, one man on each side of the front wheel 109 may be able to add and/or remove concrete from the travel path of the screed 115 during operation.

In some implementations, a pair of back wheels 107a,b may be operably connected to the back end 103 of the frame 105. One of ordinary skill art would know how to operably connect the back wheels 107a,b to the frame 105. In some implementations, the back wheels 107a,b may be positioned on or near opposing ends of the back end 103 of the frame 105 (see, e.g., FIG. 2). In some implementations, the wheels 107a,b may pivot side-to-side. In some implementations, the wheels 107a,b may not pivot side-to-side.

In some implementations, the screed 115 may be positioned and operably secured to the frame 105 between the front wheel 109 and rear wheels 107 of the grading and screeding device 100. In this way, the screed 115 may be stabilized and the unintentional forward-backward movement thereof reduced or eliminated. In some implementations, the screed 115 may be positioned below the frame 105 on or about a midpoint relative to the length of the frame 105 (e.g., the front end 101 and back end 103 of the frame).

In some implementations, a pair stabilizing members 112a,b extends from the back side 115b of the screed 115. In some implementations, the stabilizing members 112 may extend from the back side of the screed 115 at an angle perpendicular or approximately perpendicular to the back side. In some implementations, the stabilizing members 112 may be located on opposite sides of the screed 115, respectively, (see, e.g., FIG. 2) and, in some implementations, are an equidistant from the respective ends of the screed 115. In some implementations, the stabilizing members 112 may be welded, bolted, or otherwise secured to the screed 115 by any other method known to or future developed by one of ordinary skill in the art. In some implementations, a screed 115 may only include one stabilizing member 112. In some implementations, a screed 115 may include three or more stabilizing members 112.

In some implementations, one or more stabilizers 114 may be located on each side 102, 104 of the frame 105 (see, e.g., FIG. 2) to receive the stabilizing members 112a,b. In some implementations, one or more stabilizers 114 may be operatively connected to the frame 105 to receive the stabilizing members 112a,b.

In some implementations, each stabilizer 114 is comprised of two protruding members 114a, b spaced apart that extend horizontally from the frame 105 to receive the stabilizing members 112a,b. In some implementations, the protruding members of each stabilizer 114 form a guide groove 110 therebetween configured to receive width-wise and guide a stabilizing member 112. In some implementations, the distance between the protruding members of a stabilizer 114 is configured to control the back and forth movement of a stabilizing members 112. In some implementations, the distance between the protruding members of a stabilizer 114 maybe of sufficient width to allow the unimpeded or relatively unimpeded up-down movement of the stabilizing members 112 of the screed 115 during operation but minimize the back and forth movement of a stabilizing members 112.

In this way, the unintentional back and forth movement of the screed 115 may be reduce thereby possibly resulting in more precise screeding. In some implementations, each side of the frame 105 may include two or more stabilizers 114 vertically oriented relative to each other to receive the stabilizing members 112a,b (see, e.g., FIG. 1).

In some implementations, the front end 101 of the frame 105 may include an opening 108 therein. In some implementations, the opening 108 may be configured to receive a trailer hitch adaptor 160 (see, e.g., FIG. 1). In some implementations, an attached trailer hitch adaptor 160 may be configured to secure the grading and screeding device 100 to a tractor or other device equipped with a trailer hitch 162. In this way, the grading and screeding device 100 may be transported around and/or used for grading a surface prior to the pouring of uncured concrete.

In some implementations, the frame 105 may be comprised of individual pieces of material welded together. In some implementations, the frame 105 may be comprised of individual pieces of material secured together by any method known to or future developed by those of ordinary skill in the art. In some implementations, the frame 105 may be manufactured from any material(s) suitable for use as part of a grading and screeding device 100.

In some implementations, the height of the frame 105 relative to the ground may be adjusted. In some implementations, the wheels (the front wheel 109 and back wheels 107a,b) may be configured so that their distance from the frame 105 is adjustable. In this way, the distance between the ground and the frame 105 may be adjusted.

Reference throughout this specification to “an embodiment” or “an implementation” or words of similar import means that a particular described feature, structure, or characteristic is included in at least one embodiment of the present invention. Thus, the phrase “in an embodiment” or “an implementation” or a phrase of similar import in various places throughout this specification does not necessarily refer to the same embodiment.

Many modifications and other embodiments of the inventions set forth herein will come to mind to one skilled in the art to which these inventions pertain having the benefit of the teachings presented in the foregoing descriptions and the associated drawings.

The described features, structures, or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner in one or more embodiments. In the above description, numerous specific details are provided for a thorough understanding of embodiments of the invention. One skilled in the relevant art will recognize, however, that embodiments of the invention can be practiced without one or more of the specific details, or with other methods, components, materials, etc. In other instances, well-known structures, materials, or operations may not be shown or described in detail.

Claims

1. A grading and screeding device comprising:

a frame having a front end and a back end;
at least one wheel operably connected to the front end of the frame;
at least two spaced apart back wheels operably connected to the back end of the frame; and
a screed positioned and operably connected to the frame between the front end and the back end thereof.

2. The grading and screeding device of claim 1 further comprising at least a first stabilizer and a second stabilizer operably connected to the frame, wherein the screed further comprises a first stabilizing member and a second stabilizing member extending from a backside of the screed and wherein the first and second stabilizer are configured to receive the first and second stabilizing member, respectively.

3. The grading and screeding device of claim 2 wherein each stabilizer is comprised of two protruding member extending horizontally from the frame.

4. The grading and screeding device of claim 3 wherein the two protruding members of each stabilizer form a guide groove therebetween configured to receive width-wise and guide a stabilizing member.

5. The grading and screeding device of claim 3 wherein the distance between the two protruding members of a stabilizer is of sufficient width to allow for the unimpeded up-down movement of the stabilizing members of the screed during operation.

6. The grading and screeding device of claim 2 wherein the stabilizing members extend from the back side of the screed at a perpendicular angle relative thereto.

7. The grading and screeding device of claim 1 wherein the at least one wheel operably connected to the front end of the frame is removable, wherein the frame further comprises an opening on the front end, the opening being configured to removably receive a trailer hitch adaptor therein.

8. The grading and screeding device of claim 1 wherein the at least one wheel operably connected to the front end of the frame is positioned about a midway point relative to the width of the frame.

Patent History

Publication number: 20140356065
Type: Application
Filed: May 29, 2014
Publication Date: Dec 4, 2014
Inventor: Armando Munoz (Marietta, GA)
Application Number: 14/290,348

Classifications

Current U.S. Class: Screed Or Drag (404/118)
International Classification: E01C 19/22 (20060101);