METHOD OF FORMING LACROSSE MESH WITH MULTIPLE MESH SIZES

A method of forming a lacrosse mesh with a plurality of mesh sizes dispersed horizontally and vertically within the lacrosse mesh is provided. The chain notation may include control of any number of guide bars. Additionally, the chain notation may account for varying crossover length and leg length of mesh sizes formed utilizing the chain notation, wherein the varying of the crossover length and the leg length results in varying the mesh sizes while still maintaining the same chain length for forming the various mesh sizes in the lacrosse mesh.

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Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION[S]

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application entitled “METHOD OF FORMING LACROSSE MESH WITH MULTIPLE MESH SIZES,” Ser. No. 62/303,045, filed Mar. 3, 2016, and is continuation-in-part of the earlier U.S. Utility patent application entitled “LACROSSE MESH WITH MULTIPLE MESH SIZES,” Ser. No. 15/241,404, filed Aug. 19, 2016, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application entitled “LACROSSE MESH WITH MULTIPLE MESH SIZES,” Ser. No. 62/287,890, filed Jan. 27, 2016, and is a continuation-in-part of the earlier U.S. Utility patent application entitled “BLENDED LACROSSE MESH,” Ser. No. 14/861,260, filed Sep. 22, 2015, and is a continuation-in-part of the earlier U.S. Utility patent application entitled “LACROSSE MESH CONFIGURATION,” Ser. No. 14/324,979, filed Jul. 7, 2014, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application entitled “LACROSSE MESH CONFIGURATION,” Ser. No. 61/843,299, filed Jul. 5, 2013, and claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application entitled “LACROSSE MESH CONFIGURATION,” Ser. No. 61/890,454, filed Oct. 14, 2013, the disclosures of which are hereby incorporated entirely herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Technical Field

This invention relates generally to lacrosse mesh and more particularly to a method of forming lacrosse mesh having multiple mesh sizes.

State of the Art

Knitting machines are utilized to form lacrosse mesh. These knitting machines operate to form lacrosse mesh that has the same mesh sizes through the entire lacrosse mesh. Mesh has been formed this way for years. Current lacrosse mesh uniform holes do not provide ultimate ball feel during play. Optimum ball feel is critical, affecting all aspects of play. These aspects of play include cradling, passing, throwing, and catching. The end result is poor shooting accuracy. The formation of a mesh pocket in the lacrosse mesh utilizing the current mesh size available restricts the player from creating or sculpting an optimum mesh channel.

The need arises in the field of forming lacrosse mesh for a method of forming lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a method of forming knitted lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes. This method of forming knitted lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes includes utilizing improved chain notations for use on a Raschel knitting machine to form the knitted lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes.

An embodiment includes a method of forming a lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes, the method comprising: providing a multi-bar Raschel knitting machine comprising a chain for each bar of the multi-bar Raschel knitting machine used for knitting the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes, each chain have a chain notation establishing the operation of each bar, the chain notation organized to knit the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes; and operating the multi-bar Raschel knitting machine to knit the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes, wherein the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes comprises: a plurality of mesh sizes dispersed horizontally and vertically within the lacrosse mesh, wherein the plurality of mesh sizes comprises: a first mesh size; a second mesh size, wherein the second mesh size is larger than the first mesh size; and a hybrid mesh size, wherein the hybrid mesh size is different from the first mesh size and the second mesh size and operates to transition between the first and second mesh sizes.

The foregoing and other features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following more detailed description of the particular embodiments of the invention, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A more complete understanding of the present invention may be derived by referring to the detailed description and claims when considered in connection with the Figures, wherein like reference numbers refer to similar items throughout the Figures, and:

FIG. 1A is a view of a chain notation for a knitted lacrosse mesh with a small size mesh, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 1B is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the chain notation of FIG. 1A, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 2 is a front view of a knitted lacrosse mesh with a small size mesh formed using the chain notation of FIG. 1, according to an embodiment.

FIGS. 3A is a view of a chain notation for a knitted lacrosse mesh with medium size mesh, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 3B is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the chain notation of FIG. 3A, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 4A is a view of a chain notation for a knitted lacrosse mesh with large size mesh, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 4B is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the chain notation of FIG. 4A, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 5 is a front view of a knitted lacrosse mesh with a plurality of multiple mesh sizes that transition vertically, formed using a combination of the chain notations of FIGS. 1, 3 and 4, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 6A is a view of a chain notation for a knitted lacrosse mesh with a horizontal transition between multiple mesh sizes, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 6B is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the chain notation of FIG. 6A, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 7 is a front view of a knitted lacrosse mesh with a plurality of multiple mesh sizes that transition horizontally, formed using the chain notation of FIG. 6, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 8 is a front view of an example knitted lacrosse mesh with a plurality of multiple mesh sizes that transition horizontally and vertically, formed using any combination of the chain notations similar to FIGS. 1, 3, 4 and 6, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a single fiber yarn end is threaded through a guide spoon of a guide, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 10 is a view of a chain notation for a knitted lacrosse mesh with a horizontal and vertical transition between multiple mesh sizes, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 11A is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the chain notation of FIG. 10, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 11B is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 1 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 11C is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 2 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 11D is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 3 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 11E is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 4 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 11F is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 5 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 11G is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 6 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 12A is a front view of a simulated knitted lacrosse mesh with a plurality of multiple mesh sizes that transition horizontally and vertically, formed using the chain notation of FIG. 10, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 12B is a front view of a knitted lacrosse mesh with a plurality of multiple mesh sizes that transition horizontally and vertically, formed using the chain notation of FIG. 10, according to an embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

Embodiments of the present invention relate to a method of forming knitted lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes. This method of forming knitted lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes includes utilizing improved chain notations for use on a Raschel knitting machine to form the knitted lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes.

In general, a Raschel knitting machine includes a needle bar that performs vertical up and down movements allowing the needles to stitch the yarn provided by the stitching guide bars. The Raschel knitting machine also includes a stitching bar that moves in a forward and backward motion. The machine also includes knockover bar that is stationary and a guide bar with guide spoons, wherein the guide bar moves forwards, backwards and sideways. The yarn is threaded through the guide spoons of the guide bar.

The needles move up and down and the needle bar swings forwards and backwards to swing through the guide bars. The needle bars can do this either alone or combination with the swinging movement of the guide bars. When they swing in combination, the needle bar and the guide bars swing into on another during a reciprocal movement. The coordinated movement of the knitting elements of the Raschel knitting machine result in the formation of stitches using warp knitting.

This warp knitting technology results in the creation of meshes sizes that are hexagonal in shape. However, the mesh sizes are not limited to hexagonal shapes, and any geometric shape may be created as the mesh size, such as, but not limited to diamonds, octagons and the like.

In a machine with an indirect control, a shog lever is used to transmit the shog movement from the pattern drive (such as a pattern chain drive) to the guide bar y use of a push rod and the return spring. This may be done utilizing a single drum. A pattern chain may be used to control a guide bar, and for each guide bar, a single drum is utilized to control the movement of the guide bar. For the formation of one stich course, the drum rotates two or more chain link lengths.

The chain links have varying heights, wherein the change of the varying heights are marked with 0, 1, 2, 3, etc. The height marked as 0 is a base height and for each height 1, 2, 3 etc. the height is increased by a constant change in pitch t or a multiple of pitch t so that chain height marked as 1=base height+1t; the chain height marked as 2=base height+2t; the chain height marked as 3=base height+3t; and the like.

The multi-bar Raschel knitting machine is designed to manufacture knitted mesh netting, including lacrosse mesh. For example, and without limitation, a style Rm6 machine, a style Rm9 machine and similar type of machines as manufactured by Mayer Textile Machine Corp. of Obertshausen, Germany is designed specifically for the purpose of implementing multiple guide bars. The guide bars have two different functions. One function is to perform stitches from yarn or fibers. The second function is to guide the yarn or fibers to be stitched. Knitted mesh netting is created based on the guide bar relationship. The knitting machine performs this function by means of a main pattern drum with individual pattern chain links assembled to create the movement of the individual guide bars to perform their required function. Guide bar movement is on an individual bases, and requires it's own individual chain notation. When combined with all the other guide bars, the knitted mesh netting is created.

In the formation of lacrosse mesh in accordance with embodiments of the invention, the number of bars used may vary, however, the length of the chains for each bar must correlate. For example, the chain length may be the same or multiple repeats of the same chain lengths. For example a chain length for one guide bar may be 18 and the chain length for the other guide bars may be 18, 36, 72 or any multiple repeats of 18. The correlation of lengths of the chains for the stitch-in bars and for the lay-in bars allows for the crossovers of the formed lacrosse mesh to align, allowing for cutting as needed to string the lacrosse mesh onto a head of a lacrosse stick.

Referring to FIGS. 1A-1B, the chain notation shown in FIG. 1A depicts the chain notation for a small mesh size lacrosse mesh corresponds to the lapping diagram shown in FIG. 1B. In the lapping diagram of FIG. 1B, the dots represent needles and the spaces are number starting with 0 and going right to left for the particular ground guide bar that to which the chain notation refers. In other words, the chain notation for ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 corresponds to the stitching pattern depicted in the lapping pattern marked as ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. The lapping diagram represents yarn fiber knitting direction based on the corresponding ground guide bar movement as determined by the pattern chain notation. It will be understood that while it is shown that the chain pattern is for five bars, that any number of bars may be utilized and the present invention is not limited to five bars as shown, but this is only shown for the exemplary purposes of this disclosure and not as a limitation.

The chain notation of FIG. 1A shows section of 4 lapping movements, then 3 lapping movements, then 4 lapping movements, and finally 3 lapping movements. These lapping movements form a single mesh, or in other words, a single mesh is formed of the 14 lapping movements. This number of lapping movements is then repeated in the chain, in order to form chain lengths of 28 links for controlling movement of each of the ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.

FIG. 2 depicts a front view of a lacrosse mesh formed utilizing the chain notation and the lapping diagram depicted in FIGS. 1A and 1B. This lacrosse mesh is formed of small mesh sizes. The mesh sizes can be increased by changing the chain pattern.

Referring to FIGS. 3A-3B, the chain notation shown in FIG. 3A depicts the chain notation for a medium mesh size lacrosse mesh corresponds to the lapping diagram shown in FIG. 3B. In the lapping diagram of FIG. 3B, the dots represent needles and the spaces are number starting with 0 and going right to left for the particular ground guide bar that to which the chain notation refers. In other words, the chain notation for ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 corresponds to the stitching pattern depicted in the lapping pattern marked as ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. The lapping diagram represents yarn fiber knitting direction based on the corresponding ground guide bar movement as determined by the pattern chain notation. It will be understood that while it is shown that the chain pattern is for five bars, that any number of bars may be utilized and the present invention is not limited to five bars as shown, but this is only shown for the exemplary purposes of this disclosure and not as a limitation.

The chain notation of FIG. 3A shows section of 6 lapping movements, then 3 lapping movements, then 6 lapping movements, and finally 3 lapping movements. These lapping movements form a single mesh, or in other words, a single mesh is formed of the 18 lapping movements. This number of lapping movements is then repeated in the chain, in order to form chain lengths of 36 links for controlling movement of each of the ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.

Referring to FIGS. 4A-4B, the chain notation shown in FIG. 4A depicts the chain notation for a large mesh size lacrosse mesh corresponds to the lapping diagram shown in FIG. 4B. In the lapping diagram of FIG. 4B, the dots represent needles and the spaces are number starting with 0 and going right to left for the particular ground guide bar that to which the chain notation refers. In other words, the chain notation for ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 corresponds to the stitching pattern depicted in the lapping pattern marked as ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. The lapping diagram represents yarn fiber knitting direction based on the corresponding ground guide bar movement as determined by the pattern chain notation. It will be understood that while it is shown that the chain pattern is for five bars, that any number of bars may be utilized and the present invention is not limited to five bars as shown, but this is only shown for the exemplary purposes of this disclosure and not as a limitation.

The chain notation of FIG. 4A shows section of 8 lapping movements, then 3 lapping movements, then 8 lapping movements, and finally 3 lapping movements. These lapping movements form a single mesh, or in other words, a single mesh is formed of the 22 lapping movements. This number of lapping movements is then repeated in the chain, in order to form chain lengths of 44 links for controlling movement of each of the ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.

In some embodiment, the mesh sizes may be varied vertically, as depicted in FIG. 5. For example, and not as a limitation, the chain notation of FIGS. 1A, 3A and 4A may be combined to form a lacrosse mesh that transitions from a small mesh size, to a medium mesh size and then to a large mesh size as shown in FIG. 5. It will be understood that the size transitions may occur in any sequence to provide a desired location of mesh sizes vertically along the lacrosse mesh. It will also be understood that while three mesh sizes are depicted, the chain pattern may be adjusted for other various mesh sizes without departing from the scope of the present invention.

Referring to FIGS. 6A-6B, the chain notation shown in FIG. 6A depicts the chain notation for a lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes that transition horizontally across the lacrosse mesh, such as a lacrosse mesh with a first mesh size, a second mesh size and a hybrid mesh size, wherein the first mesh size is smaller than the second mesh size and the hybrid mesh size is different from both the first mesh size and second mesh size. The chain notation of FIG. 6A corresponds to the lapping diagram shown in FIG. 6B. In other words, the chain notation for ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 corresponds to the stitching pattern depicted in the lapping pattern marked as Bar 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. It will be understood that while it is shown that the chain pattern is for six bars, that any number of bars may be utilized and the present invention is not limited to six bars as shown, but this is only shown for the exemplary purposes of this disclosure and not as a limitation.

The chain notation of FIG. 6A shows lapping movements form a single mesh, or in other words, a single mesh is formed of the 18 lapping movements. This number of lapping movements is then repeated in the chain, in order to form chain lengths of 36 links for controlling movement of each of the ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.

FIG. 7 depicts a front view of a lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes formed utilizing the chain notation and the lapping diagram depicted in FIGS. 6A and 6B. This lacrosse mesh is formed of small mesh sizes, larger mesh sizes and hybrid mesh sizes as the mesh sizes transition between small and larger mesh sizes.

Referring further to the drawings, FIGS. 10-12B depict a chain notation, lapping diagram and lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes that transition horizontally and vertically. The chain notation shown in FIG. 10 depicts the chain notation for a lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes that transition horizontally and vertically across the lacrosse mesh, such as a lacrosse mesh with a first mesh size, a second mesh size and a hybrid mesh sizes, wherein the first mesh size is smaller than the second mesh size and the hybrid mesh sizes are different from both the first mesh size and second mesh size. The chain notation of FIG. 10 corresponds to the lapping diagrams shown in FIGS. 11A-11G. In other words, the chain notation for ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 corresponds to the stitching pattern depicted in the lapping pattern marked as Bar 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, as depicted in FIGS. 11A-11G. The lapping diagrams can be recognized based on the color associated with the guide bars indicated as GB1, GB2, GB3, GB4, GB5, and GB6. FIG. 11A depicts the lapping diagram for GB1, GB2, GB3, GB4, GB5, and GB6. FIG. 11B is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 1 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A. FIG. 11C is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 2 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A. FIG. 11D is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 3 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A. FIG. 11E is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 4 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A. FIG. 11F is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 5 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A. FIG. 11G is a view of a lapping diagram corresponding to the guide bar 6 of lapping diagram of FIG. 11A It will be understood that while it is shown that the chain pattern is for six bars, that any number of bars may be utilized and the present invention is not limited to six bars as shown, but this is only shown for the exemplary purposes of this disclosure and not as a limitation.

The chain notation of FIG. 10 shows lapping movements form a single mesh, or in other words, a single mesh is formed of the 14 lapping movements operated by 14 chain links. This number of lapping movements is then repeated in the chain, in order to form chain lengths of 28 links for controlling movement of each of the ground guide bars 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.

FIGS. 12A-12B depict a front view of a lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes formed utilizing the chain notation and the lapping diagrams depicted in FIGS. 10-11G. This lacrosse mesh is formed of small mesh sizes, larger mesh sizes and hybrid mesh sizes as the mesh sizes transition between small and larger mesh sizes both horizontally and vertically. The crossovers knitted in the lacrosse mesh may have a length of 2 stitches and 4 stiches. As can be seen the crossovers are aligned to allow for proper cutting of the lacrosse mesh for stringing to a lacrosse stick head.

It will be understood that the size transitions may occur in any sequence both horizontally and vertically. The size and location of the mesh sizes is determined by the threading of the lay-in bars as the lay-in bars performs its movement. It will also be understood that, the chain pattern may be adjusted for other various mesh sizes without departing from the scope of the present invention.

In embodiments of forming lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes, the chain notation may provide, for example, but without limitation, transition between a small and a large mesh size, having various hybrid mesh sizes that are formed as the locations of transition between the small and the large mesh sizes. The chain notation creates lengths of crossovers and legs of the lacrosse mesh. These vary in length depending of the size of the mesh. For example, a small mesh size may include a crossover length of 6 stitches and a leg of 3 stitches, and the large mesh size may include a crossover length of 4 stitches and a leg length of 5 stitches. Another example, without limitation, may include a small mesh size with a crossover length of 4 stitches and a leg length of 3 stiches, and may include a large mesh size with a crossover length of 2 stitches and a leg length of 5 stitches. It should be understood that forming the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes that transition both horizontally, vertically or horizontally and vertically includes forming crossovers in the mesh sizes that are aligned.

It should also be understood that the length of the crossover formed in the lacrosse mesh determine the mesh size. As the crossover length is varied in accordance with the chain notation, so is the mesh size varied. It also follows that as the crossover length is varied, so is the leg length in order to vary the mesh size. Accordingly, the multiple mesh sizes may be formed by utilizing chain notations that vary the formation of the crossover within the formed lacrosse mesh.

The characteristic of the mesh sizes that is common is that the number of stitches used to form the small and the large mesh size are the same number of stiches. However, the amount of stiches to form the mesh sizes may vary and the may vary between odd and even number of stitches to form the crossover and the leg. For example and without limitation, in lacrosse mesh that transitions between a two different mesh sizes, where one mesh size is smaller than the other mesh size the following Table 1 depicts the crossover and leg lengths of the smaller and the larger mesh sizes in a lacrosse mesh.

TABLE 1 Lacrosse Smaller mesh Smaller Larger mesh Larger Mesh crossover mesh leg crossover mesh leg configuration stitches stitches stiches stitches 1 Even Odd Even Odd 2 Odd Even Odd Even 3 Even Even Even Even 4 Odd Odd Odd Odd

It will be understood that the any type and gauge yarn may be utilized to form the lacrosse mesh. For example, and without limitation, the yarn may include nylon, polyester, polyether, ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, polypropylene, elastomeric yarns, such as spandex and lycra, fiberglass yarn, graphene, graphite yarn, carbon fiber yarn, high-tenacity yarn, such as, but not limited to high-tenacity polyesther, and any combinations thereof. Accordingly, embodiments of the present invention include forming lacrosse mesh of any of these materials, including forming conventional lacrosse mesh and lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes.

Additionally, any gauge of yarn may be utilized and combination of gauges may be used in the same lacrosse mesh. For example, and without limitation, a larger gauge yarn may be utilized on the left and right sides of the lacrosse mesh, with a smaller gauge yarn utilized in the middle portion of the lacrosse mesh in order to more easily form a pocket. The gauge of yarn to be manufactured is determined by the fiber yarn end count to be threaded through the thread guide. As shown in FIG. 9 a single fiber yarn end is threaded through the needle of the thread guide, however, to adjust the gauge of the yarn, two, three, four or any number of fiber yarn ends may be threaded through the same needle in order to increase the gauge. Further, the gauge may be adjusted throughout the formed lacrosse mesh. The gauge of the knitted mesh may be determined by the amount of yarn threaded through the knitting guide bars and the lay-in guide bars. As a general rule, but not as a limitation, the stitching bars require 2 ½ times the amount of yarn as opposed to the corresponding lay-in bars while constructing the desired pattern of mesh. The types of yarn may also be blended in the thread guide, wherein the types of yarn may include, without limitation, the types of yarn described above.

In other embodiments, variations of yarn type may be used including variation of type in a the lacrosse mesh, such as, but not limited to a nylon yarn used on the left and right sides of lacrosse mesh and an elastomeric yarn used in a middle portion of the lacrosse mesh. The yarn to form lacrosse mesh may be a multifilament yarn in some embodiments and may be a monofilament yarn in other embodiments. Embodiments of the present invention include forming lacrosse mesh of any gauge yarn, including forming conventional lacrosse mesh if varying gauge yarn and forming lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes using a single gauge yarn or using multiple gauge yarns. When multiple gauge yarns are utilized, it is understood that the gauge size may be used for a particular mesh size.

While the formation of certain configurations of lacrosse mesh having multiple mesh sizes has been shown and described, it is understood that the inverse of any configuration is easily achieved by reversing a chain pattern used by the machine to create the lacrosse mesh. Further, any style of lacrosse mesh may be created with any type of transition, hybrid mesh sizes in order to create a mesh with predetermined desired functionality and capability. It should be appreciated that the chain pattern required in order to form a knitted lacrosse mesh, such as lacrosse mesh having multiple mesh sizes utilizes chains that are the same length. The chain pattern may be established in a particular configuration to produce multiple mesh sizes and locate those multiple mesh sizes automatically during knitting or stitching of the lacrosse mesh. This will form a certain pattern of regular sized mesh sizes and hybrid mesh sizes in transition between the varying sized regular mesh sizes. That certain pattern may then be reversed by reversing the chains on the machine.

While the present invention is useful in the formation of lacrosse mesh, it is necessary for a wide variety of uses. When an object impacts or displaces the netting (such as a lacrosse ball contacting the lacrosse mesh stung onto a head of a lacrosse stick), the desired location of the different mesh sizes makes the impact or displacement more favorable. This has applicability in sports netting, safety netting and the like. It improves function and longevity of the mesh life.

Different chain notations shown in the figures are provided as examples of some of the almost infinite chain notations that can be used to create multiple mesh sizes in the lacrosse mesh. This provides the ability to form lacrosse mesh in ways to more easily form a pocket and a mesh channel that has the desired characteristics for the player's preferences.

The embodiments and examples set forth herein were presented in order to best explain the present invention and its practical application and to thereby enable those of ordinary skill in the art to make and use the invention. However, those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the foregoing description and examples have been presented for the purposes of illustration and example only. The description as set forth is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. Many modifications and variations are possible in light of the teachings above without departing from the spirit and scope of the forthcoming claims.

Claims

1. A method of forming a lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes, the method comprising:

providing a multi-bar Raschel knitting machine comprising a chain for each bar of the multi-bar Raschel knitting machine used for knitting the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes, each chain have a chain notation establishing the operation of each bar, the chain notation organized to knit the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes; and
operating the multi-bar Raschel knitting machine to knit the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes, wherein the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes comprises: a plurality of mesh sizes dispersed horizontally and vertically within the lacrosse mesh, wherein the plurality of mesh sizes comprises: a first mesh size; a second mesh size, wherein the second mesh size is larger than the first mesh size; and a hybrid mesh size, wherein the hybrid mesh size is different from the first mesh size and the second mesh size and operates to transition between the first and second mesh sizes.

2. The method of claim 1, further comprising using six bars of the multi-bar Raschel knitting machine to knit the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes.

3. The method of claim 2, wherein the chain notation of each bar differs from the other five bars.

4. The method of claim 3, further comprising providing chains for each of the six bars, wherein each chain length corresponds to the chain lengths of the other chains.

5. The method of claim 4, further wherein correlation of lengths of the chains for six bars correlates the chain lengths for bars of the six bars operating as stitch-in bars and for bars of the six bars operating as lay-in bars to form the lacrosse mesh with multiple mesh sizes with aligned crossovers.

6. The method of claim 1, further comprising:

a first yarn type; and
a second yarn type, wherein: the first yarn type is used in a first predetermined location or locations; and the second yarn type is used in a second predetermined location or locations to form the lacrosse mesh, and wherein a number ends of the first yarn type and a number of ends of the second yarn type are adjustable to adjust a gauge of the lacrosse mesh to optimize predetermined performance characteristics of the lacrosse mesh.

7. The method of claim 6, wherein the first yarn type and the second yarn type are a same type of yarn.

8. The method of claim 6, wherein the first yarn type and the second yarn type are different types of yarn.

Patent History
Publication number: 20170175309
Type: Application
Filed: Mar 3, 2017
Publication Date: Jun 22, 2017
Inventor: James C. Van Loon III (Chandler, AZ)
Application Number: 15/449,684
Classifications
International Classification: D04B 1/22 (20060101); D04B 21/12 (20060101); A63B 59/20 (20060101);