Patents Assigned to Stanford Research Institute
  • Patent number: 5978108
    Abstract: Ferroelectric materials are disclosed as reversible holographic recording media (25) for use in two-photon recording systems. The ferroelectric materials disclosed herein provide long-lived electronic states intermediate the ferroelectric material's valence and conduction bands. These intermediate states have a sufficiently long life (on the order of 1 to 100 milliseconds) that low-power continuous wave ("cw") lasers (1) can be used to record interference patterns on them. Thus, two-photon holographic recording systems are also disclosed which do not require high-power, short pulse length, mode-locked or Q-switched lasers. The disclosed two-photon holographic recording systems provide for absorption of a first photon which excites electrons of holographic recording media to an intermediate state. Thereafter, upon absorption of a second photon, the electrons are promoted to the media's conduction band where they are arranged according to the interference pattern provided by the recording system.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 2, 1997
    Date of Patent: November 2, 1999
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Yu Sheng Bai, Ravinder Kachru
  • Patent number: 4344135
    Abstract: In order to verify the authenticity of the signature of an individual, first a sample signature is written with a pen which can generate electrical signals representative of the forces exerted in the plane of the paper in the process of writing. These signals are sampled and then scaled so that the signature when displayed, can be fitted within a predetermined display area. The scaled signals generated from the sample signature are then stored. When it is desired to compare the sample signature with a signature which is subsequently written, called a specimen signature, the specimen signature is written and is processed for display in the same manner as was the sample signature. The scaled sample signature signals are then called out of storage and displayed, as are the scaled signals generated in the course of writing the specimen signature. Any deviations between the signatures are very readily detectable by observing the display.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 7, 1978
    Date of Patent: August 10, 1982
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Hewitt D. Crane, Daniel E. Wolf
  • Patent number: 4190820
    Abstract: When trains of signals, derived from a written template signature, are to be compared directly with trains of signals, derived from a written specimen signature, because no two written signatures are identical, there is a requirement for providing a certain degree of "rubberiness" between the specimen and template signals. Previously, such rubberiness was achieved by breaking up the trains of signals into fixed portions and then conducting translation, stretch and contraction between these fixed portions in the course of the comparison. In this invention, advantage is taken of the existence of prominent landmarks in the trains of signals of the template and specimen signatures. The trains of signals are broken into segments by these landmarks. Segments of the specimen are stretched or contracted and translated to match corresponding segments of the template, to greatly simplify and enhance correlation process.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: April 21, 1978
    Date of Patent: February 26, 1980
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute International
    Inventors: Hewitt D. Crane, Daniel E. Wolf
  • Patent number: 4189783
    Abstract: A mass data storage arrangement such as for books, is provided, by recording the data in the form of one micron pits in radial rows within spiral grooves of a disc. A reading element comprises a CRT providing a light beam output, which is focused down to one micron in size. The spot output of the CRT is scanned across each row having the presence or absence of pits. The light reflected from the disc is modulated by the presence or absence of pits and is reflected to a photomultiplier. The output of the photomultiplier is decoded and then displayed in human language form.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 8, 1978
    Date of Patent: February 19, 1980
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Ivor Brodie, John Kelly
  • Patent number: 4156911
    Abstract: In order to verify the authenticity of the signature of an individual, first a sample signature is written with a pen which can generate electrical signals representative of the forces exerted in the plane of the paper in the process of writing. These signals are sampled and then scaled so that the signature when displayed, can be fitted within a predetermined display area. The scaled signals generated from the sample signature are then stored. When it is desired to compare the sample signature with a signature which is subsequently written, called a specimen signature, the specimen signature is written and is processed for display in the same manner as was the sample signature. The scaled sample signature signals are then called out of storage and displayed, as are the scaled signals generated in the course of writing the specimen signature. Any deviations between the signatures are very readily detectable by observing the display.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: November 18, 1975
    Date of Patent: May 29, 1979
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Hewitt D. Crane, Daniel E. Wolf
  • Patent number: 4097869
    Abstract: An antenna comprises the combination of a biconical-horn and a circular waveguide. The major symmetry plane of the horn is horizontal and the horn describes a figure of revolution about the major axis of the circular waveguide. Coupled to the one wall of the horn with its axis perpendicular to the horizontal symmetry plane of the horn is the circular waveguide. A TEM coaxial port on the vertical axis of the horn is provided at the vertex of the cone forming the surface of the biconical-horn. Two orthogonal-ports are provided in the circular waveguide with two respective TEM transmission lines extending from within the circular waveguide outside of these ports to provide at their outputs the TE.sub.11 modes.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: March 14, 1977
    Date of Patent: June 27, 1978
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventor: Lloyd A. Robinson
  • Patent number: 4087765
    Abstract: Organic transfer laser method and means are disclosed employing a gas mixture which includes an acceptor gas comprising an organic molecular vapor, and a donor gas comprising a noble gas or a group II B transition metal, such as mercury, in the vapor state. The donor gas atoms are excited to high energy metastable and/or excimer states by electron beam excitation or electron beam initiated-sustainer discharge type exciting means. Collisional transfer of electronic excitation from the excited donor gas to the lasing organic molecules takes place for excitation of organic molecules to excited singlet states in sufficient number to establish a population inversion in the electronic energy levels thereof for lasing. Depending upon the mixture employed, the laser is tunable over the visible and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Operation at high peak power levels with high efficiency is possible.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: June 8, 1976
    Date of Patent: May 2, 1978
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Stephen A. Edelstein, Donald C. Lorents, Michael V. McCusker, Thomas F. Gallagher
  • Patent number: 4086416
    Abstract: Septacidin analogs, useful as antitumor agents, having the structure ##STR1## where R is a branched or straight chain alkanoyl group of from 12 to 16 carbon atoms. A preferred compound is 6-[4,6-dideoxy-4-(isopalmitoylglycyl)-amino-.beta.-L-glucopyranosylamino]- 9H-purine.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: May 17, 1977
    Date of Patent: April 25, 1978
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Edward M. Acton, Kenneth J. Ryan
  • Patent number: 4086567
    Abstract: When signals derived from a template signature are to be compared directly with signals derived from a specimen signature, because no two signatures are alike, there is a requirement for providing a certain degree of "rubberiness" between the specimen and template signals. Previously such rubberiness was achieved by breaking the signal up into fixed portions and then conducting translation, stretch and contraction between these fixed portions in the course of the comparison. In this invention, advantage is taken of the existence of prominent landmarks in the template and specimen signatures, and the signatures are broken up between these landmarks for the purpose of achieving rubberiness and/or translation. The landmarks in the signals derived from the signatures to be compared are exactly aligned before the correlation process is undertaken.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: August 20, 1976
    Date of Patent: April 25, 1978
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Hewitt David Crane, Daniel Errol Wolf
  • Patent number: 4081328
    Abstract: A thermostable cellulase preparation exhibiting C.sub.1 and C.sub.x cellulytic activities at a temperature from about 60.degree. to about 70.degree. C at a moderately acid pH from about 5.0 to about 5.6 is obtained by culturing the thermophilic fungus Thielavia terrestris (NRRL 8126) in a suitable cellulose-containing medium and recovering the cellulases thus produced.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 8, 1976
    Date of Patent: March 28, 1978
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Wilfred A. Skinner, Fumitake Tokuyama
  • Patent number: 4077541
    Abstract: Method and apparatus are shown for feeding particulate material into a pressurized container. A rotor is located within the pressurized container, and the rotor hub is connected to a combination drive and material supply tube which extends through a wall of the container in fluid-tight engagement therewith. Particulate material from an unpressurized supply source outside the container is fed to the rotor through the supply tube, and is discharged through radially extending flow passages formed in the rotor. Means are provided for restricting the flow of particulate material at the discharge end of the flow passages such that material flowing therein is compacted by centrifugal acceleration to substantially prevent flow of fluid from the pressurized container through the supply pipe while continuously supplying particulate material to the container.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: June 4, 1976
    Date of Patent: March 7, 1978
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventor: Robert G. Murray
  • Patent number: 4071298
    Abstract: A laser Raman/fluorescent electro-optical device is described for counting, sizing, weighing and assaying airborne particles, whereby the physical state of the atmosphere may be monitored.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: May 17, 1976
    Date of Patent: January 31, 1978
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventor: David G. Falconer
  • Patent number: 4070580
    Abstract: Isotope separation method and means are shown wherein an atomic beam containing two or more isotopes is exposed to radiation at a predetermined first wavelength to excite atoms of only one said isotope to a first intermediate excited state without substantially exciting atoms of other isotopes. These excited atoms are excited by a second radiation source at a second predetermined wavelength to a state of high principal quantum number, a Rydberg state, beneath the ionization continuum, again substantially without exciting atoms of said other isotopes to such high energy levels since substantially none of the other isotopes are in the intermediate excited state. From this bound atomic level only slightly below the ionization limit, the highly excited atoms are field ionized by electron tunneling and thence removed from the nonionized atoms by use of a moderate electric field.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: February 17, 1976
    Date of Patent: January 24, 1978
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Thomas F. Gallagher, Robert M. Hill, Stephen A. Edelstein
  • Patent number: 4066988
    Abstract: In a waveguide resonator, either coaxial or noncoaxial, there are inserted spaced slots which establish inductances in series with the waveguide structure at the location of each slot. These slots tune the resonance of the waveguide cavity, which would generally be used in a bandpass filter. Switch means are provided for each slot for discretely altering the value of the inductance established, whereby the resonator or filter may be tuned to a large number of different frequencies.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 7, 1976
    Date of Patent: January 3, 1978
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventor: Arthur Karp
  • Patent number: 4065976
    Abstract: Mechanical scanning apparatus is shown which includes a parallelogram linkage comprising a pair of parallel arms and parallel first and second connecting links adjacent opposite ends of the arms pivotally connected thereto. Transducer means, such as an ultrasonic transducer or transducer array, included in the ultrasonic imaging system, or the like, are attached to said first connecting link for movement therewith. First supporting means, adjacent the arm ends opposite the transducer means, support the parallelogram linkage thereat for movement along an arcuate path which closely approximates a portion of an ellipse adjacent a focus thereof. Constraining means, intermediate the first supporting means and transducer means, limit an intermediate portion of the parallelogram linkage to generally straight line movement along a path which extends substantially along a portion of the major axis of the ellipse.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: September 20, 1976
    Date of Patent: January 3, 1978
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Jon C. Taenzer, Steven H. Johnson
  • Patent number: 4059098
    Abstract: Essentially nonreflective coupling for ultrasonic waves is provided between a fluid medium confined in a rigid container and a biological specimen, such as a human body, through a container closing bellows system which incorporates a thin, flexible closing membrane that contacts and conforms to the contours of the specimen. A supportive bellows system between rigid parts of the fluid container and the membrane gives the membrane the essential properties of conforming to the contours of a specimen having variations in curvature (concavities and convexities) while having the ability to contain the fluid medium without rupture or undue distension when it is not supported externally, as by contact with the specimen. The supportive bellows system utilizes a pair of flexible toroidal members, one tubular and one U-shaped in cross section, attached to one another in series and having internal venting so that pressure within the toroids is governed by the pressure of the fluid inside the coupling bellows system.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: July 21, 1975
    Date of Patent: November 22, 1977
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventor: David M. Murdock
  • Patent number: 4056535
    Abstract: The compounds 3-(N-diethylcarbamyl)amino-1-methyl pyrrolidine, 3-(N-carbethoxy-N-methyl)amino-1-methyl pyrrolidine, 1-diethylcarbamyl-3-(N-methyl)amino pyrrolidine and 1-diethylcarbamyl-3-dimethylamino pyrrolidine, said compounds having utility as antifilarial agents.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: April 23, 1976
    Date of Patent: November 1, 1977
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: David W. Henry, Priscilla A. Sturm
  • Patent number: 4040011
    Abstract: An individual, who is to be subsequently identified, first signs his signature, hereinafter called a template signature, with a special pen, attached to circuits, which produce digital sample signals from which a set of parameters of his signature are derived. This set of template signature parameters is stored in a memory along with sets of parameters derived from template signatures of other individuals. Subsequently, when an individual signs his name with a special pen, the circuits will produce a set of parameters, corresponding to those produced for a template signature. Parameters are selected which can provide strong distinction between signatures. The selected parameters are then used to derive from memory only those sets of template parameters which include the selected parameters which have values falling within a predetermined acceptable range of values.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: August 20, 1976
    Date of Patent: August 2, 1977
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Hewitt D. Crane, Earle D. Jones
  • Patent number: 4040012
    Abstract: Identification of a specimen signature is provided by comparing the specimen with a previously recorded template signature. The comparison is performed by recording, for both specimen and template signatures, signals representing forces in three directions while generating these signatures. For handwritten signatures these forces are called pressure, for the force perpendicular to the plane of the paper, X for the left-right force in the plane of the paper, and Y for the near-far force in the plane of the paper.The recorded specimen signals are divided into equal parts, for example halves, and successive comparisons are made of the equal parts, first without any displacement, then with relative displacements, then by expanding the length of parts relative to one another, then by reducing the length of parts relative to one another, to find the highest correlation values for all of these comparisons. These are combined and compared with a reference.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: April 28, 1976
    Date of Patent: August 2, 1977
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventors: Hewitt David Crane, Daniel Errol Wolf, Samuel Lindenberg
  • Patent number: 4039941
    Abstract: A gas sensor is provided here comprising a semi-conductor support coated with a material which reacts with a specific gas as a result of which it exchanges electrons with the support. By measuring the resulting change in conductivity of the support, one can detect the presence of the particular gas as well as its concentration.
    Type: Grant
    Filed: May 9, 1975
    Date of Patent: August 2, 1977
    Assignee: Stanford Research Institute
    Inventor: Stanley R. Morrison