BEDDING FOR BED BUG PROTECTION

A bedding arrangement includes a mattress and a bed covering. The bed covering includes a top component adapted to cover a top surface of the mattress and a drape coupled to a perimeter portion of the top component and arranged to extend downwardly along a side wall of the mattress.

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Description

PRIORITY CLAIM

This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/831,538, filed Jun. 5, 2013, which is expressly incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND

The present disclosure relates to a device for controlling migration of pests, and particularly bed bugs. More particularly, the present disclosure relates to a sheet configured to block interaction between bed bugs and an occupant resting on a mattress.

SUMMARY

According to the present disclosure, a bedding arrangement includes a mattress foundation, a mattress, and a bed covering. The mattress foundation is arranged to underlie and support the mattress in spaced-apart relation above ground. The bed covering is coupled to the mattress and the mattress foundation and arranged to cover a top surface of the mattress.

In illustrative embodiments, a bed covering includes a top component and a drape. The top component is arranged to cover a top surface of a mattress. The drape is coupled to a perimeter edge of the top component and arranged to hang downwardly from the top component. The drape includes an exterior vertical surface arranged to face away from the mattress and have a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches. The surface roughness of the exterior surface is configured to provide means for blocking upward traversal of bed bugs along the exterior surface to reach the top component so that a person resting on the bed covering is not bitten by bed bugs crawling up to the top component.

In illustrative embodiments, the drape includes a panel anchor and a lower panel. The panel anchor is arranged to interconnect the lower panel and the top component and to extend into a space formed between the mattress and the mattress foundation. The lower panel is coupled to the panel anchor and arranged to extend downwardly along a portion of a side wall included in the mattress foundation. The lower panel includes the exterior surface.

In illustrative embodiments, the lower panel includes a bridge panel and a barrier panel. The bridge panel is appended to the panel anchor and arranged to extend downwardly along a portion of the side wall of the mattress foundation. The barrier panel is bonded to the bridge panel and arranged to extend downwardly along a second portion of the side wall of the mattress foundation and include the exterior surface.

In illustrative embodiments, the upper panel, panel anchor, and bridge panel cooperate to establish a monolithic sheet. The monolithic sheet includes an insect-barrier layer and a comfort layer.

Additional features of the present disclosure will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon consideration of illustrative embodiments exemplifying the best mode of carrying out the disclosure as presently perceived.

BRIEF DESCRIPTIONS OF THE DRAWINGS

The detailed description particularly refers to the accompanying figures in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a bedding arrangement in accordance with the present disclosure, with portions broken away, showing a person resting on the bedding arrangement that includes a bed covering formed to include a mattress-receiving space, a mattress located in the mattress-receiving space, and a mattress foundation lying below and supporting the mattress in an elevated position above the ground and suggesting that bed bugs infesting the mattress and mattress foundation are blocked from climbing up a vertical exterior surface of the bed covering to reach the person resting on top of the bed covering;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged partial perspective view of the bedding arrangement taken from a circled region of FIG. 1 showing that the bed covering includes a top component and a drape depending from a perimeter edge of the top component and showing that the drape includes an upper panel arranged to extend downwardly from the perimeter edge of the top component toward the ground, a panel anchor arranged to extend inwardly between the mattress and the mattress foundation, and a lower panel coupled to the panel anchor and arranged to extend downwardly and along a portion of a vertical side wall of the mattress foundation and suggesting that, in illustrative embodiments, an exterior surface of the lower panel has a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches to impede or otherwise block migration of bed bugs from the mattress foundation to the upper panel along the exterior surface of the lower panel;

FIG. 3 is an exploded assembly view of the of the bedding arrangement of FIG. 1 showing that the bedding arrangement includes, from top to bottom, the bed covering, the mattress, and the mattress foundation;

FIG. 4 is an exploded assembly view of the bed covering of FIGS. 1 and 3 showing side-by-side diagrammatic and illustrative views of a bed covering in accordance with the present disclosure suggesting that the bed covering includes, from top to bottom, a top component, a drape including an upper panel, an unfolded panel anchor comprising a top band bounded by upper and middle fold lines and a bottom band bounded by middle and lower fold lines, and a lower panel comprising a bridge band appended to the lower panel of the panel anchor along the lower fold line and a barrier band coupled to the bridge band to hang downwardly from the bridge band as suggested in FIGS. 2 and 6;

FIG. 5 is a series of perspective views showing how the bedding arrangement of FIG. 1 is established as a result of placing the top component over a top surface of the mattress so that the upper panel, the panel anchor, and the lower panel hang downwardly followed by tucking the panel anchor into a horizontal space provided between the mattress and mattress foundation so that the exterior surface of the lower panel is arranged in a substantially vertical orientation along an exterior portion of the side wall of the mattress foundation as shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 3 showing that the top component is formed from an outer comfort layer, an insect-barrier layer, and an inner comfort layer, the upper panel of the drape includes an inner insect-barrier layer bonded to the outer comfort layer of the top component and an outer comfort layer, the top band of the panel anchor includes an upper insect-barrier layer and an upper comfort layer, the bottom band of the panel anchor includes a lower comfort layer and a lower insect-barrier layer, the bridge band of the lower panel includes an outer comfort layer and an inner insect-barrier layer, and the barrier band of the lower panel is formed from an outer insect barrier-layer having the exterior surface and is bonded to the inner insect-barrier layer of the bridge band and an inner comfort layer;

FIG. 6A is an enlarged partial view similar to FIG. 6 of another embodiment a bed covering in accordance with the present disclosure showing that an upper panel included in the bed covering is arranged to bond with a top component included in the bed covering to cause an outer comfort layer of the upper panel to bond with an outer comfort layer of the top component;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 4 showing a vertical bond formed as a result of bonding a first end of a strip of material to an opposite second end of the strip of material to create a material loop comprising the upper panel, the panel anchor, and the bridge band that is ready to be coupled to a top edge of the barrier band to form the drape;

FIGS. 8-12 show sectional views of other illustrative embodiments of bed coverings in accordance with the present disclosure;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view (similar to FIG. 6) of another embodiment of a bed covering in accordance with the present disclosure showing that the bed covering includes a top component and a drape including an upper panel including an outer comfort layer and an inner insect-barrier layer, a top band included in a panel anchor including an upper comfort layer and an upper insect-barrier layer, a bottom band included in the panel anchor including a lower insect-barrier layer and a lower comfort layer, and a lower panel including an outer insect-barrier layer having an exterior surface characterized by a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches and an inner comfort layer;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view of another embodiment of a bed covering in accordance with the present disclosure showing that the bed covering includes a top component and a drape including an upper panel including an outer comfort layer and an inner insect-barrier layer, a top band included in a panel anchor including an upper comfort layer and an upper insect-barrier layer, a bottom band included in the panel anchor including a lower insect-barrier layer and a lower comfort layer, and a lower panel defined by an insect-barrier layer having an exterior surface characterized by a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view of another embodiment of a bed covering in accordance with the present disclosure showing that the bed covering includes a top component and a drape including an upper panel including an outer comfort layer and an inner insect-barrier layer, a panel anchor including a barrier layer and a comfort layer, and a lower panel defined by an insect barrier-layer having an exterior surface characterized by a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches;

FIG. 11 is a sectional view of another embodiment of a bed covering in accordance with the present disclosure showing that the bed covering includes the top component and a drape including an upper panel defined by a comfort layer, a panel anchor defined by a comfort layer, and a lower panel defined by an insect barrier-layer having an exterior surface characterized by a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches and the comfort layer of the panel anchor and the comfort layer of the top panel are monolithic; and

FIG. 12 is a diagrammatic view of another embodiment of a bed covering in accordance with the present showing that the bed covering includes the top component and a drape including an upper panel defined by an insect-barrier layer, a panel anchor defined by an insect-barrier layer, and a lower panel defined by an insect barrier-layer having the exterior surface and the insect-barrier layer of the panel anchor and the insect-barrier layer of the bottom panel are monolithic.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A bedding arrangement 10 in accordance with the present disclosure is shown for example, in FIGS. 1, 2, 3, and 5. Bedding arrangement 10 comprises, for example, a first embodiment of a bed covering 12 in accordance with the present disclosure, a mattress 14, and a mattress foundation 16 as shown in FIGS. 1-3. One illustrative method for installing bed covering 12 on mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 is shown in FIG. 5. Other embodiments of bed coverings 212, 312, 412, 512, and 612 are shown, for example, in FIGS. 8-12.

Bed covering 12 is coupled to mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 and includes a vertical exterior surface 20 configured to provide means for blocking climbing of bed bugs 22 infesting mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 to reach a person 24 resting on bed covering 12 as shown in FIG. 1. As a result, person 24 may rest on or use mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 during an infestation of bed bugs 22 without being bitten by bed bugs 22.

Bedding arrangement 10 comprises, for example, bed covering 12, mattress 14, and mattress foundation 16 as shown in FIGS. 1-3. Mattress foundation 16 is arranged to rest on ground 18 and support mattress 14 in spaced-apart relation above ground 18. Bed covering 12 includes a top component 26 and a drape 28 as shown in FIGS. 1, 3, and 4. Top component 26 is arranged to contact and cover a top mattress surface 30 as suggested in FIGS. 3 and 5. Drape 28 is coupled to a perimeter edge 26P of top component 26 and arranged to depend in a downward direction 32 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4. As shown in FIG. 2, drape 28 provides vertical exterior surface 20 which has a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches. As a result of the surface roughness being less than about 0.000005 inches, bed bugs 22 are blocked from climbing up vertical exterior surface 20 as suggested in FIG. 2.

Drape 28 includes an upper panel 34, a panel anchor 36, and a lower panel 38 as shown, for example, in FIG. 4. Upper panel 34 is bonded to top component 26 and arranged to extend downwardly toward ground 18. Panel anchor 36 is appended to upper panel 34 and arranged to extend into a space 40 formed between mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16. Lower panel 38 is bonded to panel anchor 36 and arranged to extend downwardly along a portion of a vertical side wall 42 included in mattress foundation 16. As shown in FIG. 2, lower panel 38 is configured to provide vertical exterior surface 20 which has the surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches which impedes or otherwise blocks migration of bed bugs 22 from mattress foundation 16 to upper panel 34 and top component 26.

As shown, for example in FIGS. 4 and 6, lower panel 38 includes a bridge band 44 and a barrier band 46. Bridge band 44 is appended to panel anchor 36 and is arranged to extend downwardly toward ground 18 as shown in FIG. 2. Barrier band 46 is bonded to bridge band 44 and arranged to hang downwardly along the portion of vertical side wall 42 of mattress foundation 16. Barrier band 46 provides exterior surface 20 which blocks scaling of bed bugs 22 up to upper panel 34 and top component 26 as suggested in FIGS. 1 and 2.

Barrier band 46 comprises an outer insect-barrier layer 46B and an inner comfort layer 46C as shown in FIG. 6. In one example, outer insect-barrier layer 46B is bonded to inner comfort layer 46C through an extrusion coating process. However, any other suitable alternative method of bonding outer insect-barrier layer 46B to inner comfort layer 46C may be used. Outer insect-barrier layer 46B provides exterior surface 20 has the surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches which impedes upward crawling of bed bugs 22 as shown in FIG. 2. Exterior surface 20 of outer insect-barrier layer 46B is arranged to face away from mattress foundation 16. Inner comfort layer 46C is arranged to lie between exterior surface 20 and mattress foundation 16.

Outer insect-barrier layer 46B is further configured to provide means for blocking biting of bed bugs 22 located between outer insect-barrier layer 46B and mattress foundation 16 as a result of outer insect-barrier layer 46B being substantially continuous and imperforate. In one example, outer insect-barrier layer 46B is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012.

Outer insect-barrier layer 46B provides exterior surface 20 having a surface, for example, of less than 0.000005 inches. The surface roughness was measured in a vertical direction 48 as suggested in FIG. 2. Vertical direction 48, for example is transverse to a machine direction MD as shown in FIG. 4. Machine direction MD is the direction of travel of the material during application of outer insect-barrier layer 46B to inner comfort layer 46C. In another illustrative embodiment, outer insect-barrier layer 46B may also have a surface roughness of less than 0.000004 inches. In yet another illustrative embodiment, outer insect-barrier layer 46B may have a surface roughness of less than 0.000003 inches. In yet another illustrative embodiment, outer insect-barrier layer 46B may have a surface roughness of about 0.00000122 inches. In another illustrative embodiment, outer insect-barrier layer 0.00000118 inches.

Inner comfort layer 46C of barrier band 46 is illustratively a breathable nonwoven material. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In another example, inner comfort layer 46C of barrier band 46 is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene. Inner comfort layer 46C may also be provided with or without a pattern of apertures formed in the layer. These apertures have a diameter smaller than a diameter of a mouth part of a bed bug.

In another illustrative example, the nonwoven material of inner comfort layer 46C may be a biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material wherein each fiber is a polyethylene sheath surrounding a polypropylene core. In another example, inner comfort layer 46C of barrier band 46 is a SOFTEX® brand material having a basis weight of 28 grams per square meter. The SOFTEX® brand material is available from Fitesa Washougal, Washougal, Wash.

As described previously, bed covering 12 includes top component 26 and drape 28 as shown in FIG. 4. Top component 26 is arranged to cover and overlie top mattress surface 30 as shown in FIG. 1. Top component 26 is further configured to provide means for transporting moisture provided by person 24 resting on top component 26 in an inbound direction 50 from person 24 into a mattress-receiving space 52 formed in bed covering 12 when person 24 is resting on top component 26 and in an outward direction 54 from mattress-receiving space 52 to atmosphere 56 surrounding bedding arrangement 10 when person 24 is not resting on bedding arrangement 10 without allowing passage of needle-like mouth parts of bed bugs 22 through top component 26 so that person 24 is not bitten by bed bugs 22 located in mattress-receiving space 52 and the comfort of person 24 resting on bedding arrangement 10 is maximized as a result of moisture being transported away from person 24 and bed bugs 22 being blocked from biting person 24 as suggested in FIG. 1. Reference is hereby made to U.S. application Ser. No. 13/735,749 filed Jul. 11, 2013 and titled BEDDING for disclosure relating to sheets used to form a top component in accordance with the present disclosure, which application is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

Top component 26 includes, for example, from outside to inside, an outer comfort layer 26O, an insect-barrier layer 26B, and an inner comfort layer 26I as shown in FIG. 6. Outer comfort layer 26O is configured to provide an outer surface 26O1 arranged to face away from mattress 14. Inner comfort layer 26I is configured to provide an inner surface 26I1 which is arranged to face toward mattress 14. Insect-barrier layer 26B is arranged to lie between and interconnect inner and outer comfort layers 26I, 26O. Insect-barrier layer 26B provides means for blocking biting of bed bugs 22 as a result of insect-barrier layer 26B being substantially continuous and imperforate while still having the ability to transport moisture from zones of higher concentration to zones of relatively lower concentration.

Outer comfort layer 26O of top component 26 is illustratively a breathable nonwoven material which has the ability to transfer moisture in the form of water vapor through the material at a rate of at least about 50 grams per square meter per 24 hours. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In one example, outer comfort layer 26O of top component 26 is a made from a biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material wherein each fiber is a polyethylene sheath surrounding a polypropylene core. In an example, the nonwoven material may be a SOFTEX® brand material having a basis weight of 28 grams per square meter. In yet another example, outer comfort layer 26O of top component 26 is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene. Outer comfort layer 26O of top component 26 may also be provided with or without a pattern of apertures formed in the layer.

Insect-barrier layer 26B of top component 26 is illustratively a blend of about 30% breathable copolyamide resin and about 70% nonbreathable resin. The breathable copolyamide resin may be PEBAX® 1074 and the nonbreathable resin may be LOTRYL® 28MA07. In another example, insect-barrier layer 26B of top component 26 is made of a blend of 70% PEBAX® 1074 and 30% LOTRYL® 28MA07. In yet another illustrative example, insect-barrier layer 26B of top component 26 may be a coextrusion of 7% ARNITEL® EM400 inner skin, 86% ANRITEL® VT3108, and 7% ARNITEL® EM400 outer skin.

Inner comfort layer 26I of top component 26 is illustratively a breathable nonwoven material which has the ability to transfer moisture in the form of water vapor through the material at a rate of at least about 50 grams per square meter per 24 hours. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In one example, inner comfort layer 26I of top component 26 is a made from a biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material wherein each fiber is a polyethylene sheath surrounding a polypropylene core. In another embodiment, the nonwoven material may be a SOFTEX® material having a basis weight of 28 grams per square meter. In yet another example, inner comfort layer 26I of top component 26 is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene. Inner comfort layer 26I of top component 26 may also be provided with or without a pattern of apertures formed in the layer.

Together, outer comfort layer 26O, insect-barrier layer 26B, and inner comfort layer 26I may be formed through an extrusion lamination process. In this example, outer comfort layer 26O is unwound along with inner comfort layer 26I. Inner and outer comfort layers 26I, 26O are then laminated together by insect-barrier layer 26B which is applied via extrusion of the molten material between inner and outer comfort layers 26I, 26O. As a result, top component 26 is formed and wound for further processing.

Top component 26 of drape 28 is coupled to upper panel 34 to cause upper panel to extend downwardly along a portion of a mattress side wall 58 as shown in FIG. 2. Upper panel 34 includes an outer comfort layer 34C and an inner insect-barrier layer 34B as shown in FIG. 6. Inner insect-barrier layer 34B is arranged to bond outer comfort layer 34C to outer comfort layer 26O of top component 26 as shown in FIG. 6. Outer comfort layer 34C is arranged in spaced-apart relation to mattress side wall 58 to locate inner insect-barrier layer 34B therebetween.

Outer comfort layer 34C of upper panel 34 illustratively is a breathable nonwoven material which has the ability to transfer moisture in the form of water vapor through the material at a rate of at least about 50 grams per square meter per 24 hours. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In another example, outer comfort layer 34C is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene.

Inner insect-barrier layer 34B of upper panel 34 is further configured to provide means for blocking biting of bed bugs 22 located between outer comfort layer 34C and mattress 14 as a result of inner insect-barrier layer 34B being substantially continuous and imperforate. In one example, inner insect-barrier layer 34B is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a LDPE resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012. In one example, inner insect-barrier layer 34B has a thickness 60 about 1 mil. In another example, inner insect-barrier layer 34B has thickness 60 of about 0.5 mil.

As shown in FIG. 4, for example, panel anchor 36 includes a top band 36T and a bottom band 36B. Top band 36T is appended to a lower end of upper panel 34 and arranged to extend away from upper panel 34 and into a space 40 formed between mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 when bed covering 12 is unfolded and applied to mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. Bottom band 36B is appended to top band 36T and is arranged to extend between and interconnect top band 36T and bridge band 44 of lower panel 38. As shown in FIG. 2, Top band 36T is located between bottom band 36B and mattress 14. Bottom band 36B is located between top band 36T and mattress foundation 16 as shown in FIG. 2.

Top band 36T includes an upper comfort layer 36TC and an upper insect-barrier layer 36TB as shown in FIG. 6. Upper comfort layer 36TC is appended to outer comfort layer 34C of upper panel 34. Upper insect-barrier layer 36TB is appended to inner insect-barrier layer 34B of upper panel 34 as shown in FIG. 6. Upper insect-barrier layer 36TB is located between mattress 14 and upper comfort layer 36TC as suggested in FIG. 6. Upper comfort layer 36TC is located between upper insect-barrier layer 36TB and bottom band 36B.

Upper insect-barrier layer 36TB of top band 36T is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a LDPE resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012. In one example, upper insect-barrier layer 36TB has thickness 60.

Upper comfort layer 36TC is illustratively a breathable nonwoven material. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In another example, upper comfort layer 36TC is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene. In yet another example, upper comfort layer 36TC is made from a biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material wherein each fiber is a polyethylene sheath surrounding a polypropylene core. The biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material may be a SOFTEX® brand material having a basis weight of 28 grams per square meter.

Bottom band 36B includes a lower comfort layer 36BC and a lower insect-barrier layer 36BB as shown in FIG. 6. Lower comfort layer 36BC is appended to upper comfort layer 36TC of top band 36T. Lower insect-barrier layer 36BB is appended to upper insect-barrier layer 36TB of top band 36T as shown in FIG. 6. Lower insect-barrier layer 36BB is located between mattress foundation 16 and lower comfort layer 36BC as suggested in FIG. 6. Lower comfort layer 36BC is located between upper comfort layer 36TC and lower insect-barrier layer 36BB.

Lower comfort layer 36BC of bottom band 36B is illustratively a breathable nonwoven material. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In another example, lower comfort layer 36BC is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene. In yet another example, lower comfort layer 36BC is made from a biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material wherein each fiber is a polyethylene sheath surrounding a polypropylene core. The bicomponent spunbond nonwoven material may be a SOFTEX® brand material having a basis weight of 28 grams per square meter.

Lower insect-barrier layer 36BB of bottom band 36B is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a LDPE resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012. In one example, lower insect-barrier layer 36BB has thickness 60.

Bridge band 44 of lower panel 38 includes, for example, an outer comfort layer 44C and an inner insect-barrier layer 44B as shown in FIG. 6. Inner insect-barrier layer 44B is appended to lower insect-barrier 36BB of bottom band 36 as shown in FIG. 6. Outer comfort layer 44C is appended to lower comfort layer 36BC as shown in FIG. 6. Outer comfort layer 44C is arranged in spaced-apart relation to mattress vertical side wall 42 of mattress foundation 16 to locate inner insect-barrier layer 44B therebetween.

Outer comfort layer 44C of bridge band 44 is illustratively a breathable nonwoven material which has the ability to transfer moisture in the form of water vapor through the material at a rate of at least about 50 grams per square meter per 24 hours. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In another example, outer comfort layer 44C is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene.

Inner insect-barrier layer 44B of bridge band 44 is further configured to provide means for blocking biting of bed bugs 22 located between outer comfort layer 44C and mattress foundation 16 as a result of inner insect-barrier layer 44B being substantially continuous and imperforate. In one example, inner insect-barrier layer 44B is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a LDPE resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012. In one example, inner insect-barrier layer 44B has a thickness 59 greater than 2 mil. In another example, inner insect-barrier layer 44B has thickness 59 of greater than 3 mil.

As shown in FIG. 6, outer comfort layer 34C, upper comfort layer 36TC, lower comfort layer 36BC, and outer comfort layer 38C cooperate to establish a first monolithic sheet 61. Inner insect-barrier layer 34B, upper insect-barrier layer 36TB, lower insect-barrier layer 36BB, and inner insect-barrier layer 44B cooperate to establish a second monolithic sheet 62.

During a bed-covering production process, a strip 70 of material 72 is formed. In one illustrative example, strip 70 includes an insect-barrier layer and a comfort layer. Upper panel 34 is formed as a result of bonding a first end 70A of strip 70 to an opposite second end 70B of strip 70 to create a material loop 74 as shown in FIG. 4. Material loop 74 is used during the bed-covering production process to establish upper panel 34, panel anchor 36, and bridge band 44 as shown in FIG. 4. During installation of bed covering 12 on mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16, panel anchor 36 is folded inwardly into space 40 along an upper fold line 75, a middle fold line 76, and a lower fold line 77 as suggested in FIG. 4 and shown in FIG. 5. In one example, bonds may be formed using heat, adhesive, ultrasonic molding, or any other suitable alternative.

Top band 36T of panel anchor 36 is appended to upper panel 34 along upper fold line 75. Bottom band 36B of panel anchor 36 is appended to top band 36T along middle fold line 76. Bridge band 44 is appended to bottom band 36B along lower fold line 77 as shown in FIG. 4. After installation of bed covering 10 on mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16, bridge band 44 hangs downwardly way from panel anchor 36 along lower fold line 77 as shown in FIG. 5.

After bed covering 10 is installed on mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16, bed clothes may be applied to bedding arrangement 10. In one example, a fitted sheet may be placed around upper panel 34 and top component 26 of bed covering 12. The fitted sheet may include an elastic lower portion which causes a perimeter edge of the fitted sheet to be drawn into space 40 between top band 36T and bottom band 36B of panel anchor 36. Once the fitted sheet is applied, a flat sheet may be tucked between top and bottom bands 36T, 36B along a bottom edge of bedding arrangement 10 so that person 24 may sleep between the fitted sheet and the flat sheet. As a result of the sheets being coupled to the bedding arrangement by trapping portions of the sheets between the top and bottom bands 36T, 36B, exterior surface 20 with a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches is maintained so that bed bugs cannot climb up to person 24.

Surface roughness is measured, for example, using a HOMMEL-ETAMIC W5 roughness measuring system. The HOMMEL-ETAMIC W5 is available from JENOPTIC Industrial Metrology German GmbH of Germany. The surface roughness measured was the Roughness Average (RA).

In another illustrative embodiment, a barrier band included in a lower panel of a drape in accordance with the present disclosure may be made from a multi-layer plastics material. The multi-layer material includes a first layer, a second layer, and a third layer. In one example, the first layer is about 20% of the multi-layer material by weight and is defined by about 100% BRASKEM PP H110.02N. The second layer is about 60% of the multi-layer material by weight and includes 70% DOW™ 2056G, about 25% CHEVRON 5754, and about 5% AMPACET 111017P. The third layer is about 20% of the multi-layer material by weight and is defined by about 100% BRASKEM PP H110.02N. The multi-layer material provides an exterior surface having a surface roughness of less than 0.0000003 inches. The multi-layer material may have thickness 60 of greater than 2 mil.

In another example of the multi-layer material, the first layer is about 20% of the multi-layer material by weight and is defined by about 100% TOTAL 8473. The second layer is about 60% of the multi-layer material by weight and includes 70% DOW™ 2056G, about 25% CHEVRON 5754, and about 5% AMPACET 111017P. The third layer is about 20% of the multi-layer material by weight and is defined by about 100% TOTAL 8473. The multi-layer material provides an exterior surface having a surface roughness of less than 0.0000003 inches. The multi-layer material may have thickness 60 of greater than 2 mil.

In still yet another example of the multi-layer material, the first layer is about 20% of the multi-layer material by weight and includes about 96% TOTAL 8473 and about 4% AMPACET 10090. The second layer is about 60% of the multi-layer material by weight and includes 70% DOW™ 2056G, about 25% CHEVRON 5754, and about 5% AMPACET 111017P. The third layer is about 20% of the multi-layer material by weight and includes about 96% TOTAL 8473 and about 4% AMPACET 10090. The multi-layer material provides an exterior surface having a surface roughness of less than 0.0000005 inches. The multi-layer material may have an exterior surface roughness of less than 0.00000043 inches. The multi-layer material may have thickness 60 of greater than about 3 mil.

Another embodiment of a bed covering 112 in accordance with the present disclosure is suggested in FIG. 6A. Bed covering 112 includes top component 26 and a drape 128 as shown in FIG. 6A. Drape 228 includes an upper panel 134, panel anchor 36, and lower panel 38.

Upper panel 134 of drape 128 is appended to perimeter edge 26P of top component 26 as shown in FIG. 6A. Upper panel 134 includes an outer comfort layer 134C and an inner insect-barrier layer 34B as shown in FIG. 6A. Outer comfort layer 134C is arranged to bond inner insect-barrier layer 34B with outer comfort layer 26O of top component 26 as shown in FIG. 6A. Outer comfort layer 134C is arranged in spaced-apart relation to mattress side wall 58 to locate inner insect-barrier layer 34B therebetween.

Outer comfort layer 134C of upper panel 34 is illustratively made from a biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material wherein each fiber is a polyethylene sheath surrounding a polypropylene core. The bicomponent spunbond nonwoven material may be a SOFTEX® material having a basis weight of 28 grams per square meter.

Another embodiment of a bed covering 212 in accordance with the present disclosure is shown, for example, in FIG. 8. Bed covering 212 includes top component 26 and drape 228 as shown in FIG. 8. Drape 228 includes an exterior surface 220 configured to provide means for blocking climbing of bed bugs 22 infesting mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 to reach a person 24 resting on bed covering 212. As a result, person 24 may rest on or use mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 during an infestation of bed bugs 22 without being bitten by bed bugs 22. Vertical exterior surface 220 which has a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches. As a result of the surface roughness being less than about 0.000005 inches, bed bugs 22 are blocked from climbing up vertical exterior surface 220

Drape 228 includes upper panel 34, panel anchor 36, and a lower panel 238. Lower panel 238 is bonded to panel anchor 36 and is arranged to extend downwardly toward ground 18. Lower panel 238 provides exterior surface 220 which blocks scaling of bed bugs 22 up to upper panel 34 and top component 26.

Lower panel 238 comprises an outer insect-barrier layer 238B and an inner comfort layer 238C as shown in FIG. 8. In one example, outer insect-barrier layer 238B is bonded to lower insect-barrier layer 36BB of panel anchor 36. Outer insect-barrier layer 238B provides exterior surface 220 which has the surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches which impedes upward crawling of bed bugs 22. Exterior surface 220 of outer insect-barrier layer 238B is arranged to face away from mattress foundation 16. Inner comfort layer 238C is arranged to lie between exterior surface 220 and mattress foundation 16.

Outer insect-barrier layer 238B is further configured to provide means for blocking biting of bed bugs 22 located between outer insect-barrier layer 238B and mattress foundation 16 as a result of outer insect-barrier layer 238B being substantially continuous and imperforate. In one example, outer insect-barrier layer 238B is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012.

Inner comfort layer 238C of lower panel 238 is illustratively a breathable nonwoven material. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In another example, inner comfort layer 238C of barrier band 46 is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene. Inner comfort layer 238C may also be provided with or without a pattern of apertures formed in the layer. These apertures should have a diameter smaller than a diameter of a mouth part of a bed bug.

In another illustrative example, the nonwoven material of inner comfort layer 238C may be a biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material wherein each fiber is a polyethylene sheath surrounding a polypropylene core. In another example, inner comfort layer 238C of lower panel 238 is a SOFTEX® brand material having a basis weight of 28 grams per square meter.

Another embodiment of a bed covering 312 in accordance with the present disclosure is shown, for example, in FIG. 9. Bed covering 312 includes top component 26 and drape 328 as shown in FIG. 9. Drape 328 includes an exterior surface 320 configured to provide means for blocking climbing of bed bugs 22 infesting mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 to reach a person 24 resting on bed covering 312. As a result, person 24 may rest on or use mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 during an infestation of bed bugs 22 without being bitten by bed bugs 22. Vertical exterior surface 320 which has a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches. As a result of the surface roughness being less than about 0.000005 inches, bed bugs 22 are blocked from climbing up vertical exterior surface 320

Drape 328 includes upper panel 34, panel anchor 36, and a lower panel 338. Lower panel 338 is bonded to panel anchor 36 and is arranged to extend downwardly toward ground 18. Lower panel 338 provides exterior surface 320 which blocks scaling of bed bugs 22 up to upper panel 34 and top component 26.

Lower panel 338 is defined by an insect-barrier layer 338B as shown in FIG. 9. In one example, insect-barrier layer 338B is bonded to lower insect-barrier layer 36BB of panel anchor 36. Insect-barrier layer 338B provides exterior surface 320 which has the surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches which impedes upward crawling of bed bugs 22. Exterior surface 320 of outer insect-barrier layer 238B is arranged to face away from mattress foundation 16.

Insect-barrier layer 338B is further configured to provide means for blocking biting of bed bugs 22 located between insect-barrier layer 338B and mattress foundation 16 as a result of insect-barrier layer 338B being substantially continuous and imperforate. In one example, insect-barrier layer 338B is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012.

Another embodiment of a bed covering 412 in accordance with the present disclosure is shown, for example, in FIG. 10. Bed covering 412 includes top component 26 and drape 428 as shown in FIG. 10. Drape 428 includes an exterior surface 420 configured to provide means for blocking climbing of bed bugs 22 infesting mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 to reach a person 24 resting on bed covering 412. As a result, person 24 may rest on or use mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 during an infestation of bed bugs 22 without being bitten by bed bugs 22. Vertical exterior surface 420 which has a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches. As a result of the surface roughness being less than about 0.000005 inches, bed bugs 22 are blocked from climbing up vertical exterior surface 420.

Drape 428 includes upper panel 34, anchor panel 436, and a lower panel 438. Lower panel 438 is bonded to panel anchor 436 and upper panel 34 and is arranged to extend downwardly toward ground 18. Lower panel 438 provides exterior surface 420 which blocks scaling of bed bugs 22 up to upper panel 34 and top component 26.

Lower panel 438 is defined by an insect-barrier layer 438B as shown in FIG. 10. In one example, insect-barrier layer 438B is bonded to outer comfort layer 34C of upper panel 34 and to a lower comfort layer 436C of panel anchor 436 as shown in FIG. 10. Insect-barrier layer 438B provides exterior surface 420 which has the surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches which impedes upward crawling of bed bugs 22. Exterior surface 420 of insect-barrier layer 438B is arranged to face away from mattress foundation 16.

Insect-barrier layer 438B is further configured to provide means for blocking biting of bed bugs 22 located between insect-barrier layer 438B and mattress foundation 16 as a result of insect-barrier layer 438B being substantially continuous and imperforate. In one example, insect-barrier layer 438B is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012.

As shown, for example, in FIG. 10, panel anchor 436 includes an upper insect-barrier layer 436B and a lower comfort layer 436C. Upper insect-barrier layer 436B is appended to inner insect-barrier layer 34B of upper panel 34 and arranged to extend inwardly into space 40 between mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16. Lower comfort layer 436C is appended to outer comfort layer 34C of upper panel 34 and arranged to extend into space 40 between mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16.

Upper insect-barrier layer 436B of panel anchor 436 is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a LDPE resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012. In one example, upper insect-barrier layer 36TB has thickness 60.

Lower comfort layer 436C of panel anchor 436 is illustratively a breathable nonwoven material. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In another example, lower comfort layer 436C is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene. In yet another example, lower comfort layer 436C is made from a biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material wherein each fiber is a polyethylene sheath surrounding a polypropylene core. The bicomponent spunbond nonwoven material may be a SOFTEX® brand material having a basis weight of 28 grams per square meter.

Another embodiment of a bed covering 512 in accordance with the present disclosure is shown, for example, in FIG. 11. Bed covering 512 includes top component 26 and drape 528 as shown in FIG. 11. Drape 528 includes an exterior surface 520 configured to provide means for blocking climbing of bed bugs 22 infesting mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 to reach a person 24 resting on bed covering 512. As a result, person 24 may rest on or use mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 during an infestation of bed bugs 22 without being bitten by bed bugs 22. Vertical exterior surface 520 which has a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches. As a result of the surface roughness being less than about 0.00005 inches, bed bugs 22 are blocked from climbing up vertical exterior surface 520

Drape 528 includes an upper panel 534, anchor panel 536, and a lower panel 538. Lower panel 538 is bonded to panel anchor 536 and upper panel 534 and is arranged to extend downwardly toward ground 18. Lower panel 538 provides exterior surface 520 which blocks scaling of bed bugs 22 up to upper panel 534 and top component 26.

Upper panel 534 is defined by a comfort layer 534C as shown in FIG. 11. Comfort layer 534C is arranged to bond outer comfort layer 34C of top component 26 as shown in FIG. 11. Comfort layer 534C of upper panel 534 is illustratively a breathable nonwoven material. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In another example, comfort layer 534C is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene. In yet another example, comfort layer 534C is made from a biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material wherein each fiber is a polyethylene sheath surrounding a polypropylene core. The bicomponent spunbond nonwoven material may be a SOFTEX® brand material having a basis weight of 28 grams per square meter.

As shown in FIG. 11, for example, panel anchor 536 is defined by comfort layer 536C. Comfort layer 536C is appended to comfort layer 534C of upper panel 534 and arranged to extend inwardly into space 40 between mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16. Comfort layer 536C of panel anchor 536 is illustratively a breathable nonwoven material. The nonwoven material is a material having a structure of individual fibers, filaments, or threads which are interlaid in an unidentifiable pattern. In another example, comfort layer 536C is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene. In yet another example, comfort layer 536C is made from a biocomponent spunbond nonwoven material wherein each fiber is a polyethylene sheath surrounding a polypropylene core. The bicomponent spunbond nonwoven material may be a SOFTEX® brand material having a basis weight of 28 grams per square meter.

Lower panel 538 is defined by an insect-barrier layer 538B as shown in FIG. 11. In one example, insect-barrier layer 538B is bonded to comfort layer 534C of upper panel 34 and to comfort layer 536C of panel anchor 536 as shown in FIG. 11. Insect-barrier layer 538B provides exterior surface 520 which has the surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches which impedes upward crawling of bed bugs 22. Exterior surface 520 of insect-barrier layer 538B is arranged to face away from mattress foundation 16.

Insect-barrier layer 538B is further configured to provide means for blocking biting of bed bugs 22 located between insect-barrier layer 538B and mattress foundation 16 as a result of insect-barrier layer 538B being substantially continuous and imperforate. In one example, insect-barrier layer 538B is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012.

Another embodiment of a bed covering 612 in accordance with the present disclosure is shown, for example, in FIG. 12. Bed covering 612 includes top component 26 and a drape 628 as shown in FIG. 12. Drape 628 includes an exterior surface 620 configured to provide means for blocking climbing of bed bugs 22 infesting mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 to reach a person 24 resting on bed covering 612. As a result, person 24 may rest on or use mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16 during an infestation of bed bugs 22 without being bitten by bed bugs 22. Vertical exterior surface 620 has a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches. As a result of the surface roughness being less than about 0.000005 inches, bed bugs 22 are blocked from climbing up vertical exterior surface 620

Drape 628 includes an upper panel 634, panel anchor 636, and a lower panel 638. Lower panel 638 is bonded to panel anchor 636 and upper panel 634 and is arranged to extend downwardly toward ground 18. Lower panel 638 provides exterior surface 620 which blocks scaling of bed bugs 22 up to upper panel 634 and top component 26.

Upper panel 634 is defined by an insect-barrier layer 634B as shown in FIG. 12. Insect-barrier layer 634B is arranged to bond to outer comfort layer 34C of top component 26 as shown in FIG. 12. Insect-barrier layer 634B of upper panel 634 is illustratively from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012.

As shown, for example, in FIG. 12, panel anchor 636 is defined by an insect-barrier layer 636B. Insect-barrier layer 636B is appended to insect-barrier layer 534B of upper panel 534 and arranged to extend inwardly into space 40 between mattress 14 and mattress foundation 16. Insect-barrier layer 636B of panel anchor 636 is illustratively made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012.

Lower panel 638 is defined by an insect-barrier layer 638B as shown in FIG. 12. In one example, insect-barrier layer 638B is appended to insect-barrier layer 636B of panel anchor 636 and bonded to insect-barrier layer 634B of upper panel 634 as shown in FIG. 12. Insect-barrier layer 638B provides exterior surface 620 which has the surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches which impedes upward crawling of bed bugs 22. Exterior surface 620 of insect-barrier layer 538B is arranged to face away from mattress foundation 16.

Insect-barrier layer 638B is further configured to provide means for blocking biting of bed bugs 22 located between insect-barrier layer 638B and mattress foundation 16 as a result of insect-barrier layer 638B being substantially continuous and imperforate. In one example, insect-barrier layer 638B is made from a plastics material. For example, the plastics material is a Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) resin. The LDPE resin may be DOW™ LDPE 4012.

Reference is hereby made to U.S. application Ser. No. 13/305,030 filed Jun. 7, 2013 and titled BED BUG PROTECTION DEVICE and to U.S. Application No. 61/420,114 filed Dec. 6, 2010 and titled BED BUG PROTECTION DEVICE for disclosure relating to bed bug protection devices, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein in their entirety.

Claims

1. A bed covering comprising

a top component adapted to cover a top surface of a mattress and
a drape coupled to a perimeter edge of the top component and arranged to extend downwardly away from the top component, the drape including a panel anchor adapted to extend into a space defined between a mattress and a mattress foundation and a lower panel arranged to extend downwardly from the panel anchor and provide an exterior surface adapted to face away from a mattress and having a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches.

2. The bed covering of claim 1, wherein the drape further includes an upper panel coupled to the perimeter edge of the top component and arranged to extend downwardly toward the panel anchor and interconnect the top component and the panel anchor.

3. The bed covering of claim 2, wherein the panel anchor is located between the upper panel and the lower panel.

4. The bed covering of claim 2, wherein the upper panel includes an outer comfort layer adapted to lie in spaced-apart relation to a mattress and an inner barrier layer adapted to lie between the outer comfort layer and a mattress.

5. The bed covering of claim 2, wherein the lower panel includes an outer barrier layer adapted to lie in spaced-apart relation to a mattress foundation and an inner comfort layer adapted to lie between and the outer barrier layer and a mattress foundation and the outer barrier layer provides the exterior surface.

6. The bed covering of claim 2, wherein the panel anchor includes an upper barrier layer appended to the upper panel and adapted to lie between the mattress and the mattress foundation, an upper comfort layer appended to the upper panel and adapted to lie between the upper barrier layer and the mattress foundation, a lower comfort layer appended to the lower panel and adapted to lie between the upper comfort layer and the mattress foundation, and a lower barrier layer appended to the lower panel and adapted to lie between the lower comfort layer and the mattress foundation.

7. The bed covering of claim 6, wherein the upper panel includes an outer comfort layer adapted to lie in spaced-apart relation to a mattress and an inner barrier layer adapted to lie between the outer comfort layer and a mattress and the outer comfort layer of the upper panel, the upper comfort layer of the panel anchor, and the lower comfort layer of the panel anchor cooperate to provide a first monolithic sheet.

8. The bed covering of claim 7, wherein the inner barrier layer of the upper panel, the upper barrier layer of the panel anchor, and the lower barrier layer of the panel anchor cooperate to provide a second monolithic sheet.

9. The bed covering of claim 6, wherein the lower panel includes an outer barrier layer including the exterior surface and an interior surface arranged to face opposite the exterior surface and an inner comfort layer adapted to face away from a mattress and an inner comfort layer including an inner surface adapted to face toward a mattress and an outer surface arranged to face toward and abut the interior surface of the outer barrier layer.

10. The bed covering of claim 9, wherein the outer barrier layer of the lower panel is bonded to the lower barrier layer of the panel anchor and the outer barrier layer of the lower panel is spaced apart from the lower comfort layer of the panel anchor.

11. The bed covering of claim 1, wherein the lower panel includes a barrier band providing the exterior surface and a bridge band arranged to extend between and interconnect the panel anchor and the barrier band.

12. The bed covering of claim 11, wherein the barrier band includes an outer barrier layer including the exterior surface and an interior surface arranged to face opposite the exterior surface and an inner comfort layer adapted to face away from a mattress and an inner comfort layer including an inner surface adapted to face toward a mattress and an outer surface arranged to face toward and abut the interior surface of the outer barrier layer.

13. The bed covering of claim 12, wherein the bridge band includes an outer comfort layer adapted to lie in spaced-apart relation to a mattress foundation and an inner barrier layer adapted to lie between the outer comfort layer and the mattress foundation.

14. The bed covering of claim 13, wherein the outer barrier layer of the barrier band is bonded to the inner barrier layer of the bridge band.

15. The bed covering of claim 2, wherein the top component is configured to provide means for transporting moisture provided by a person resting on the bed covering in an inbound direction from a person resting on the top component into a mattress-receiving space formed in the bed covering when a person is resting on the top component and in an outward direction from the mattress-receiving space to atmosphere surrounding the bed covering when a person is not resting on the top component without allowing passage of needle-like mouth parts of bed bugs through the top component so that a person resting on the top component is not bitten by bed bugs located in the mattress-receiving space and comfort of a person resting on the top component is maximized as a result of moisture being transported away from the person and bed bugs being blocked from biting the person.

16. The bed covering of claim 15, wherein the top component includes an inner comfort layer having an inner surface adapted to face toward a mattress, an outer comfort layer spaced apart from the inner comfort layer and having an outer surface arranged to face away from the inner surface, and an insect-barrier layer positioned to lie between the inner and outer comfort layers and configured to provide means for blocking passage of needle-like mouth parts of bed bugs through the top component so that a person resting on the outer comfort layer of the top component is not bitten by bed bugs located in the mattress-receiving space.

17. The bed covering of claim 16, wherein the upper panel includes an outer comfort layer adapted to lie in spaced-apart relation to a mattress located in the mattress-receiving space and an inner barrier layer adapted to lie between the outer comfort layer and a mattress.

18. The bed covering of claim 17, wherein the outer comfort layer of the upper panel is bonded to the outer comfort layer of the top component and the inner barrier layer of the upper panel is spaced apart from the outer comfort layer of the top component.

19. The bed covering of claim 17, wherein the inner barrier layer of the upper panel is arranged to lie between and interconnect the outer comfort layer of the upper panel and the outer comfort layer of the top component.

20. The bed covering of claim 1, wherein the drape further includes an upper panel and the upper panel includes an outer comfort layer adapted to lie in spaced-apart relation to a mattress and an inner barrier layer adapted to lie between the outer comfort layer and a mattress, the panel anchor includes an upper barrier layer appended to the upper panel and adapted to lie between a mattress and a mattress foundation, an upper comfort layer appended to the upper panel and adapted to lie between the upper barrier layer and a mattress foundation, a lower comfort layer appended to the lower panel and adapted to lie between the upper comfort layer and a mattress foundation, and a lower barrier layer appended to the lower panel and adapted to lie between the lower comfort layer and a mattress foundation and the lower panel defined by a barrier layer including the exterior surface and an interior surface arranged to face opposite the exterior surface.

21. The bed covering of claim 20, wherein the barrier layer is bonded to the lower barrier layer of the panel anchor.

22. The bed covering of claim 1, wherein the drape further includes an upper panel and the panel anchor includes a barrier layer appended to the upper panel and adapted to lie between a mattress and a mattress foundation and a comfort layer appended to the upper panel and adapted to lie between the barrier layer and a mattress foundation.

23. The bed covering of claim 22, wherein the lower panel is defined by a barrier layer including the exterior surface and an interior surface arranged to face opposite the exterior surface.

24. The bed covering of claim 23, wherein the barrier layer of the lower panel is bonded to the comfort layer of the panel anchor.

25. The bed covering of claim 22, wherein the upper panel includes an outer comfort layer and an inner barrier layer adapted to lie between a mattress and the outer comfort layer, the barrier layer of the panel anchor is monolithic with the inner barrier layer of the upper panel, and the comfort layer of the panel anchor is monolithic with the outer comfort layer of the upper panel.

26. The bed covering of claim 1, wherein the drape further includes an upper panel arranged to extend between and interconnect the top component and the panel anchor and the panel anchor is defined by a comfort layer adapted to lie between a mattress and a mattress foundation.

27. The bed covering of claim 26, wherein the lower panel is defined by a barrier layer and the barrier layer includes the exterior surface and an interior surface arranged to face opposite the exterior surface.

28. The bed covering of claim 27, wherein the barrier layer of the lower panel is bonded to the upper panel and the panel anchor is located in spaced-apart relation to the barrier layer of the lower panel.

29. The bed covering of claim 26, wherein the upper panel includes a comfort layer having an outer surface adapted to face away from a mattress and an inner surface adapted to face toward a mattress, the comfort layer of the panel anchor is monolithic with the comfort layer of the upper panel.

30. The bed covering of claim 1, wherein the panel anchor is defined by a barrier layer adapted to lie between a mattress and a mattress foundation.

31. The bed covering of claim 30, wherein the lower panel is defined by a barrier layer including the exterior surface and an interior surface arranged to face opposite the exterior surface.

32. The bed covering of claim 31, wherein the drape further includes an upper panel arranged to extend between and interconnect the panel anchor and the top component and the upper panel is defined by a barrier layer having an outer surface adapted to face away from a mattress and an inner surface adapted to face toward a mattress and the barrier layer of the lower panel is bonded to the inner surface of the barrier layer of the upper panel.

33. The bed covering of claim 32, wherein the barrier layer of the panel anchor and the barrier layer of the lower panel cooperate to form a monolithic sheet.

34. The bed covering of claim 1, wherein the surface roughness is measured along a vertical direction of the exterior surface of the lower panel.

35. The bed covering of claim 34, wherein the vertical direction is a direction transverse to a machine direction defined during manufacturing of the lower panel.

36. The bed covering of claim 35, wherein the surface roughness is less than 0.000003 inches.

37. The bed covering of claim 36, wherein the surface roughness is less than 0.000002 inches.

38. The bed covering of claim 1, wherein the drape further includes an upper panel arranged to extend downwardly toward the panel anchor and interconnect the top component and the panel anchor and the upper panel includes an outer comfort layer and an inner barrier layer adapted to lie between the outer comfort layer of the upper panel and a mattress, the lower panel includes an outer barrier layer including the exterior surface and an inner comfort layer adapted to lie between the outer barrier layer of the lower panel and a mattress foundation, the inner barrier layer of the upper panel has a first thickness, and the outer barrier layer of the lower panel has a relatively greater second thickness.

39. The bed covering of claim 38, wherein the relatively second thickness is greater than 2 mil.

40. The bed covering of claim 39, wherein the relatively second thickness is greater than 3 mil.

41. The bed covering of claim 35, wherein the relatively second thickness is about 3 mil.

42. The bed covering of claim 38, wherein the first thickness is less than 2 mil.

43. The bed covering of claim 42, wherein the first thickness is less than 1 mil.

44. The bed covering of claim 42, wherein the first thickness is less than 0.5 mil.

45. The bed covering of claim 42, wherein the first thickness is about 1 mil.

46. The bed covering of claim 45, wherein the relatively second thickness is about 3 mil.

47. A bedding arrangement comprising

a mattress including a top mattress surface and a mattress side wall arranged to extend downwardly from the top mattress surface,
a mattress foundation including a top foundation surface arranged to face toward the mattress and a foundation side wall arranged to extend downwardly from the top foundation surface, and
a bed covering including a top component arranged to contact and cover the top mattress surface, an upper panel coupled to a perimeter edge of the top component and arranged to extend downwardly along the mattress side wall, a panel anchor coupled to the upper panel to extend into a space formed between the mattress and the mattress foundation, and a lower panel coupled to panel anchor to extend downwardly from the panel anchor and to locate the panel anchor between the lower panel and the upper panel,
wherein the lower panel includes an exterior surface arranged to away from the foundation side wall and the exterior surface of the lower panel and is configured to provide means for blocking upward traversal of bed bugs along the exterior surface to reach the top component so that so that a person resting on the bed covering is not bitten by bed bugs crawling up to the top component.

48. The bedding arrangement of claim 47, wherein the exterior surface has a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches.

49. The bedding arrangement of claim 48, wherein the exterior surface has a surface roughness of less than 0.000003 inches.

50. The bedding arrangement of claim 47, wherein the top component is configured to provide means for transporting moisture provided by a person resting on the bed covering in an inbound direction from a person resting on the bed covering into a mattress-receiving space formed in the bed covering when a person is resting on the bed covering and in an outward direction from the mattress-receiving space to atmosphere surrounding the bed covering when a person is not resting on the bed covering without allowing passage of needle-like mouth parts of bed bugs through the top component so that a person resting on the bed covering is not bitten by the bed bugs located in the mattress-receiving space and comfort of a person resting on the bed covering is maximized as a result of moisture being transported away from the person and the bed bugs being blocked from biting the person.

51. The bedding arrangement of claim 50, wherein the mattress-receiving space is defined between the panel anchor and the upper panel.

52. The bedding arrangement of claim 50, wherein the top component includes an inner comfort layer configured to provide an inner surface that faces toward the mattress, an outer comfort layer spaced apart from the inner comfort layer and configured to provide an outer surface arranged to face away from the inner surface, and an insect-barrier layer positioned to lie between the inner and outer comfort layers and configured to provide means for blocking passage of needle-like mouth parts of bed bugs through the top component so that a person resting on the outer comfort layer of the top component is not bitten by the bed bugs located in the mattress-receiving space formed in the bed covering.

53. The bedding arrangement of claim 47, wherein the exterior surface has a surface roughness of less than 0.000005 inches, the top component includes an inner comfort layer configured to provide an inner surface that faces toward the mattress, an outer comfort layer spaced apart from the inner comfort layer and configured to provide an outer surface arranged to face away from the inner surface, and an insect-barrier layer positioned to lie between the inner and outer comfort layers and configured to provide means for blocking passage of needle-like mouth parts of bed bugs through the top component so that a person resting on the outer comfort layer of the top component is not bitten by the bed bugs located in the mattress-receiving space formed in the bed covering, and the top component is made from a breathable nonwoven material.

54. The bedding arrangement of claim 53, wherein the breathable nonwoven material has a moisture transfer rate of at least about 50 grams per square meter per 24 hours.

55. The bedding arrangement of claim 54, wherein the breathable nonwoven material is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of polyester and polypropylene.

56. The bedding arrangement of claim 55, wherein the insect-barrier layer is made from the same material as the outer comfort layer.

57. The bedding arrangement of claim 56, wherein the insect-barrier layer is made from a blend of about 30% breathable copolyamide resin and about 70% nonbreathable resin.

58. The bedding arrangement of claim 52, wherein the insect-barrier layer is made from a blend of about 30% breathable copolyamide resin and about 70% nonbreathable resin.

59. The bedding arrangement of claim 47, wherein the lower panel includes an outer insect-barrier layer including the exterior surface and an inner comfort layer coupled to the outer insect-barrier layer and arranged to lie between the outer insect-barrier layer and the mattress foundation.

60. The bedding arrangement of claim 59, wherein the outer comfort layer is made from a breathable nonwoven material.

61. The bedding arrangement of claim 60, wherein the breathable nonwoven material is a 30 grams per square meter spunlace blend of about 50% polypropylene fibers and about 50% polyethylene terephthalate.

62. The bedding arrangement of claim 59, wherein the insect-barrier layer is made from low density polyethylene.

Patent History

Publication number: 20140359948
Type: Application
Filed: Jun 7, 2013
Publication Date: Dec 11, 2014
Inventors: Jeffrey Alan Middlesworth (Wauconda, IL), Eric Snell (Meansville, GA), Carrie Snell (Meansville, GA)
Application Number: 13/913,122

Classifications

Current U.S. Class: Mattress (for Whole Body) (5/690); Adapted To Contact Mattress (5/499)
International Classification: A47G 9/02 (20060101); A47C 31/00 (20060101);