MULTIFUNCTION STRUCTURAL FURRING SYSTEM

Structural furring systems having enhanced drainage functionality are described. Furring strips can include a substantially planar face, substantially planar webs extending from edges of the face, and substantially planar legs extending from opposite edges of the legs. The face and/or legs include a row or array of protrusions configured to accommodate drainage and ventilation between the furring strip and an attached exterior cladding and/or building substrate. Furring strips can be manufactured by rolling a sheet metal such as steel. Additional embodiments include a furring tape configured to be affixed to a substantially flat face of a commercially available furring strip to provide similar drainage features.

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Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of priority under 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 62/478,980, filed Mar. 30, 2017, entitled “MULTIFUNCTION STRUCTURAL FURRING SYSTEM,” which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

BACKGROUND Field

The present disclosure generally relates to building construction materials and methods, and more particularly relates to cladding systems including furring.

Description of the Related Art

Cladding panels such as those made of fiber cement are frequently attached to the structural frame of a building to form a non-structural facade of the building. Furring strips are often disposed between the cladding panels and the building structure to form an air gap therebetween. The air gap creates a capillary break which allows for drainage and evaporation of moisture.

Conventional furring strips can present a number of disadvantages. They typically must be installed in a vertical orientation so as to provide adequate drainage, as horizontally oriented furring strips can limit the drainage and drying capacity of a wall cavity behind a cladding. Lateral spacing and alignment of vertically oriented furring is generally relatively inflexible, being determined by the location and spacing of studs or other vertically oriented building substrate materials. In addition, the wind load rating on cladding panels fastened to conventional furring strips may be less than desirable. Nail withdrawal or pull through are common causes of cladding system failure.

SUMMARY

The systems, methods, and devices described herein address one or more problems as described above and associated with current furring systems. The systems, methods and devices described herein have innovative aspects, no single one of which is indispensable or solely responsible for their desirable attributes. Without limiting the scope of the claims, the summary below describes some of the advantageous features.

According to the present disclosure there is provided a furring strip as set out in appended claims 1 to 9. There is also provided a wall cladding system comprising a furring strip and at least one wall cladding panel as set out in appended claims 10 and 11.

In one embodiment, a furring strip for mounting a wall cladding article to a building substrate is described. The furring strip comprises a substantially planar face defined generally by a length and a width, the substantially planar face comprising a first edge and a second edge opposite the first edge along the width, a plurality of substantially planar webs, each substantially planar web extending from the first edge or the second edge of the substantially planar face, and a plurality of substantially planar legs parallel to the substantially planar face, each substantially planar leg extending from one of the plurality of substantially planar webs at an end opposite the substantially planar face. The substantially planar face comprising a plurality of protrusions configured to produce one or more drainage channels between the substantially planar face and a cladding article secured to the substantially planar face, said drainage channels defining at least one gravity-assisted fluid flow path when the furring strip is mounted in a horizontal or vertical orientation.

In some embodiments, each of the plurality of substantially planar legs comprises a plurality of protrusions configured to produce one or more drainage channels between the substantially planar legs and a building substrate secured to the substantially planar legs.

In some embodiments, the protrusions comprise an array of dimples extending from an outer side of the face. In some embodiments, the dimples are arranged in a rectangular array on the substantially planar face with a spacing of at least 0.25 inches (6.35mm) and not greater than approximately 1 inch (2.54cm) between adjacent dimples. In some embodiments, the dimples extend to a height of between approximately 0.03125 inches (0.7938mm) and approximately 0.25 inches (6.35mm) relative to the outer side of the substantially planar face. In some embodiments, the dimples extend to a height of between approximately 0.0625 inches (1.5875 mm) and approximately 0.125 inches (3.175mm) relative to the outer side of the substantially planar face.

In some embodiments, each of the substantially planar webs comprises a plurality of openings extending through the substantially planar web to accommodate water or air flow through the web. In some embodiments, each of the openings has a width between approximately 0.1 inches (2.54mm) and approximately 0.3 inches (7.62mm), and a length between approximately 0.5 inches (1.27cm) and 1.5 inches (3.81cm).

In some embodiments, the furring strip comprises a rolled sheet metal. In some embodiments, the metal comprises steel having a thickness of at least 20 gauge and not greater than 16 gauge. In some embodiments, a wind load of approximately 44.4 lbf (195.7 N)at two or more fastening points along the face produces a deflection between 0 and l/240 inches, where l is the span distance, expressed in inches (l/609.6 cm when expressed in cm), between the fastening points.

In one embodiment, a wall cladding system having a multifunction structural furring is described. The wall cladding system comprises the furring strip as described above and at least one wall cladding panel.

In one particular embodiment, the furring strip of the wall cladding strip comprises a substantially planar face defined generally by a length and a width, the substantially planar face comprising a first edge and a second edge opposite the first edge along the width, the face comprising an array of convex dimples extending from an outer side of the substantially planar face; a plurality of substantially planar webs, each substantially planar web extending from the first edge or the second edge of the substantially planar face in a direction opposite the outer side, each substantially planar web comprising a plurality of openings extending through the substantially planar web to accommodate water or air flow through the substantially planar web; and a plurality of substantially planar legs parallel to the substantially planar face, each substantially planar leg extending from one of the plurality of substantially planar webs at an end opposite the substantially planar face, each substantially planar leg comprising a row of convex dimples extending from an inner side of the substantially planar leg opposite the substantially planar webs and substantially planar face, wherein the furring strip is mounted to the exterior of a building substrate by a plurality of mechanical fasteners such that the convex dimples of the substantially planar legs abut the building substrate and the length of the substantially planar face is in a horizontal orientation relative to the building substrate. The at least one wall cladding panel is mounted to the furring strip by one or more mechanical fasteners such that the convex dimples of the substantially planar face abut the wall cladding panel. An inner surface of the wall cladding panel, the outer side of the substantially planar face, and two or more of the dimples of the substantially planar face define a first gravity-assisted drainage flow path. The building substrate, the inner sides of the legs, and two or more of the dimples of the substantially planar legs define a second gravity-assisted drainage flow path.

In one embodiment the furring strip of the wall cladding strip is made of a rolled sheet metal. In some embodiments, the rolled sheet metal comprises steel having a thickness of at least 20 gauge and not greater than 16 gauge. In some embodiments, the dimples are arranged in a rectangular array on the face with a spacing of at least 0.25 inches (6.35 mm) and not greater than approximately 1 inch (2.54cm) between adjacent dimples. In some embodiments, the dimples extend to a height of between 0.03125 inches (0.7938mm) and approximately 0.25 inches (6.35mm) relative to the outer side of the face. In some embodiments, the dimples extend to a height of between approximately 0.0625 inches (1.5875 mm) and approximately 0.125 inches (3.175mm) relative to the outer side of the face. In some embodiments, a wind load producing a force of 44.4 lbf (195.7 N)at two or more adjacent mechanical fasteners mounting the wall cladding panel to the furring strip induces a deflection in the face between 0 and //240 inches, where / is the span distance, expressed in inches (//609.6 cm when expressed in cm), between the two adjacent mechanical fasteners.

In another embodiment, an adhesive drainage tape for a furring strip is described. The adhesive tape comprises a substantially planar tape defined generally by a length, a width, an inner surface, and an outer surface, the inner surface at least partially coated with a chemical adhesive, and an array of protrusions extending from the outer surface, the protrusions generally defined by a height relative to the outer surface and a spacing between adjacent protrusions. The adhesive tape is configured to be fixed by the chemical adhesive to a substantially flat face surface of a structural furring strip before an exterior cladding article is coupled to the furring strip such that, when the exterior cladding article is coupled to the furring strip, a gravity-assisted drainage flow path is defined by an inner surface of the wall cladding panel, the outer surface of the tape, and two or more of the protrusions.

In some embodiments, the protrusions are arranged in a rectangular array on the outer surface with a spacing of at least 0.25 inches (6.35mm) and not greater than approximately 1 inch (2.54cm) between adjacent protrusions. In some embodiments, the protrusions extend to a height of between approximately 0.03125 inches (0.7938mm) and approximately 0.25 inches (6.35mm) relative to the outer surface. In some embodiments, the protrusions extend to a height of between approximately 0.0625 inches (1.5875 mm) and approximately 0.125 inches (3.175mm) relative to the outer surface. In some embodiments, the protrusions comprise dimples having a circular cross-section. In some embodiments, the width of the adhesive tape is selected to fit against a face of a hat channel furring strip.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Certain embodiments of the present disclosure will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings. From figure to figure, the same or similar reference numerals are used to designate similar components of an illustrated embodiment.

FIG. 1A is a perspective view of a furring strip with drainage features in accordance with a first example embodiment.

FIG. 1B is a cross-sectional profile view taken about the line 1B-1B of FIG. 1A, illustrating an example configuration of drainage features incorporated therein.

FIG. 1C is a side elevation view of the furring strip of FIGS. 1A and 1B.

FIG. 1D is a top plan view of the furring strip of FIGS. 1A-1C.

FIG. 2A is a perspective view of a furring strip with drainage features in accordance with a second example embodiment.

FIG. 2B is an end profile view of the furring strip of FIG. 2A, illustrating an example configuration of drainage features incorporated therein.

FIG. 2C is a side elevation view of the furring strip of FIGS. 2A and 2B.

FIG. 2D is a top plan view of the furring strip of FIGS. 2A-2C.

FIG. 3A is a perspective view of a furring strip with drainage features in accordance with a third example embodiment.

FIG. 3B is an end profile view of the furring strip of FIG. 3A, illustrating an example configuration of drainage features incorporated therein.

FIG. 3C is a side elevation view of the furring strip of FIGS. 3A and 3B.

FIG. 3D is a top plan view of the furring strip of FIGS. 3A-3C.

FIG. 4A is a perspective view of a furring strip with drainage features in accordance with a fourth example embodiment.

FIG. 4B is an end profile view of the furring strip of FIG. 4A, illustrating an example configuration of drainage features incorporated therein.

FIG. 4C is a side elevation view of the furring strip of FIGS. 4A and 4B.

FIG. 4D is a top plan view of the furring strip of FIGS. 4A-4C.

FIG. 5A is a perspective view of a furring strip with drainage features in accordance with a fifth example embodiment.

FIG. 5B is an end profile view of the furring strip of FIG. 5A, illustrating an example configuration of drainage features incorporated therein.

FIG. 5C is a side elevation view of the furring strip of FIGS. 5A and 5B.

FIG. 5D is a top plan view of the furring strip of FIGS. 5A-5C.

FIG. 6A is a perspective view of a furring strip with drainage functionality in accordance with a sixth example embodiment.

FIG. 6B is an end profile view of the furring strip of FIG. 6A, illustrating an example configuration of drainage features incorporated therein.

FIG. 6C is a side elevation view of the furring strip of FIGS. 6A and 6B.

FIG. 6D is a top plan view of the furring strip of FIGS. 6A-6C.

FIG. 7A is a front elevation view of a structural furring system including a plurality of furring strips installed on a building substrate.

FIG. 7B is a side profile view of the system of FIG. 7A.

FIG. 8A is a front elevation view of a rain screen system including cladding articles secured to the furring strips of FIG. 7A.

FIG. 8B is a side profile view of the system of FIG. 8A.

FIG. 9A is a perspective view of a furring strip and a textured adhesive tape configured to provide rain screen drainage functionality when applied to the furring strip.

FIGS. 9B-9G depict alternative surface texture configurations of the adhesive tape depicted in FIG. 9A.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Although the present disclosure is described with reference to specific examples, it will be appreciated that the present disclosure may be embodied in many other forms.

The embodiments discussed herein are merely illustrative and do not limit the scope of the present disclosure.

In the description which follows, like parts may be marked throughout the specification and drawings with the same reference numerals. The drawing figures are not necessarily to scale and certain features may be shown exaggerated in scale or in somewhat generalized or schematic form in the interest of clarity and conciseness.

To assist in the description of various components of the furring systems described herein, the following coordinate terms are used (see, e.g., FIGS. 1A-1B). A “length” of a furring strip generally refers to the longest dimension of the furring strip embodiments depicted. A “width” is the dimension normal to the length and parallel to the plane of the faces and legs of a furring strip. A “height” is the dimension normal to the length and width. For example, the perspective view of FIG. 1A depicts a furring strip having a length along the direction of the z axis, a width along the direction of the x axis, and a height along the direction of the y axis. An “inner” surface or component is generally configured to be disposed proximal to and/or oriented toward a building substrate, and an “outer” surface or component is generally configured to be disposed distal to and/or oriented away from a building substrate. For example, the view of FIG. 7B depicts several furring strips having legs 710 disposed at the inner end of webs 730, and a face 720 disposed at the outer end of webs 730. Although certain dimensions will be provided for various components described and depicted herein, each of the furring strips and components thereof may be implemented with different dimensions in other embodiments, for example, by scaling the dimensions isotropically and/or by independently altering individual dimensions.

Furring has traditionally been installed vertically. Horizontal furring may be desirable in building construction for various reasons, such as to enable a flexible or customizable layout for vertical panel joints, and/or to provide a regular and/or symmetrical layout of cladding fasteners independent of the location of vertical framing members. However, existing furring products typically cannot be installed horizontally because a horizontal configuration tends to cause water to collect above the furring strips, rather than draining downward. Existing furring products thus typically are installed vertically, at locations determined by the location and availability of vertical framing studs, resulting in relatively few options for the location of vertical panel joints.

Generally described, various embodiments of the present disclosure provide a furring system comprising multifunctional furring strips that can be installed in a horizontal orientation, a vertical orientation, or an orientation between horizontal and vertical, while providing desirable drainage, ventilation, and wind load resistance attributes in any such orientation. Furring strips described herein can be installed horizontally to a building substrate, and exterior cladding articles of various weights, such as fiber cement siding or the like, can be secured to the furring strips to create a rain screen system including an air gap between the exterior cladding and the building substrate. When the furring strips described herein are installed as part of a rain screen system, surface dimples can provide a capillary break, drainage channel, or ventilation space at one or more interfaces between the furring strips and the building substrate or exterior cladding. Certain embodiments of the furring strips disclosed herein have dimples with a combination of dimple height and dimple spacing configured to provide desirable drainage in a horizontal configuration, while also providing reliable wind load resistance and prevention of blowout or nail pull-through. For example, certain embodiments of the furring strips disclosed herein may provide up to three gravity-assisted fluid flow paths (e.g., between the legs and a building substrate, between the face and a cladding, and/or through web openings).

Some embodiments of the present disclosure provide drained furring tape that can be applied to existing furring strips that lack sufficient drainage when installed horizontally. Drained furring tapes can be adhesive tapes having an outer surface with an array of raised drainage features. Thus, a length of furring tape can be applied to an outward-facing surface of a commercially available flat furring strip, such as a metal hat channel or wood furring strip, to produce a drained furring strip that can be installed in a horizontal configuration in a rainscreen system.

FIGS. 1A-1D depict a first embodiment of a furring strip 100 incorporating drainage functionality. The furring strip 100 is a lineal structural member having a profile defined generally by legs 110, a face 120, and webs 130 disposed between and contiguous with the legs 110 and the face 120. The legs 110 are substantially planar and include leg dimples 115 spaced along the length of each leg 110. Similarly, the face 120 is substantially planar and parallel to the legs 110, with face dimples 125 spaced in an array along the length and width of the face 120. Webs 130 extend between the lateral ends of the face 120 and the medial ends of the legs 110, with web openings 135 spaced along the length of the webs 130. The dimples 115, 125, and web openings 135 provide enhanced drainage and ventilation, as will be described in greater detail below.

The furring strip 100 is configured to be installed adjacent to a building substrate to secure a cladding article, such as a fiber cement panel or the like, to the building substrate in a spaced configuration to form an air gap. The furring strip 100 is generally configured for installation such that the legs 110 and/or leg dimples 115 are adjacent to the building substrate along the length of the furring strip 100 and/or at various locations along the furring strip 100 (e.g., if the furring strip 100 is mounted to a plurality of discrete structural members such as studs, rather than to a sheathing or other continuous substrate), and the face 120 and/or face dimples 125 are adjacent to the cladding article, so as to form an air gap having a width determined by the height 132 of the furring strip 100 (as shown in FIG. 1B). Mechanical fastening means can be used to secure the legs 110 to the building substrate and to secure the cladding article to the face 120. Installation of strips such as furring strip 100 with cladding and building substrates is discussed in greater detail below with reference to FIGS. 7A-8B.

All or a portion of the furring strip 100 can be made from any suitable material, for example, a metal such as steel, aluminum, or the like. In some embodiments, the furring strip 100 comprises a single piece of steel of a suitable thickness to retain dimensional stability when coupled to a building substrate and a cladding article. For example, the furring strip 100 can be manufactured from sheet steel, for example, bare metal sheet steel or corrosion-treated sheet steel, having a thickness between 20 gauge (0.0329 inches or 0.836 mm) and 16 gauge (0.0538 inches or 1.367 mm). In embodiments comprising sheet steel, the furring strip 100 can be manufactured by rolling, extruding, pressing, or the like. In some embodiments, the furring strip 100 is manufactured by producing the dimples 115, 125 and punching, laser cutting, or otherwise creating the web openings 135 into a strip of sheet steel, and then forming the pre-textured strip with web openings 135 into the final channel shape using a roll form or the like. In some embodiments, the metal material may further have a fine profile, or surface texture, on the outer surfaces 110a, 120a of the legs 110 and face 120, for example, to assist in the orientation of mechanical fasteners being driven through the furring strip 100 and prevent unintended lateral movement (e.g., “walking” or “wandering”) of mechanical fastener tips when being driven through the furring strip 100.

As shown in greater detail in FIG. 1B, several features of the profile of the furring strip 100 are configured to provide enhanced drainage functionality. Each leg 110 has an outer leg surface 110a and an inner leg surface 110b. Each leg dimple 115 includes a recess 115a of the outer leg surface 110a, and a corresponding protrusion 115b of the inner leg surface 110b. Similarly, the face 120 has an outer face surface 120a and an inner face surface 120b. Each face dimple 125 includes a protrusion 125a of the outer face surface 120a, and a corresponding recess 125b of the inner face surface 120b.

Dimples are generally characterized by a dimple spacing 126 and a dimple height 127. As used herein, the dimple spacing 126 is the lateral displacement (e.g., in the x or z direction of FIGS. 1A-1D) between the centers of adjacent dimples 115, 125. Dimple spacing may refer to the spacing of face dimples 125 along the width of the face 120, and/or the spacing of leg dimples 115 or face dimples 125 along the length of the leg 110 or face 120. The dimple height 127 is the vertical displacement (e.g., in the y direction of FIGS. 1A-1D) between the outer face surface 120a and the center of the protrusion 125a. For a leg dimple 115, the dimple height 127 can similarly be measured as the vertical displacement between the inner leg surface 110b and the center of the protrusion 115b.

The webs 130 are disposed between the legs 110 and the face 120 and extend from the legs 110 and face 120 at an intersection defined by a web angle φ between the web 130 and either the outer leg surface 110a or the inner face surface 120b. The web angle φ can be acute, right, or obtuse, however, an obtuse web angle web angle φ greater than 90° may advantageously facilitate drainage when the furring strip 100 is installed against a vertical building substrate, such that the direction of gravity is substantially along the x axis. Thus, the height 132 of the furring strip 100, as generally defined by the vertical displacement between the center of the protrusions 115b of the inner leg surface 110b and the center of the protrusions 125a of the outer face surface 120a, is at least partially dependent on the length of the webs 130 and on the web angle φ. In the example embodiment shown in FIGS. 1A-1D, the angle φ is approximately 95°.

The example furring strip 100 shown in FIGS. 1A-1D has a height 132 of 0.75 inches (19.05 mm). The dimples of the furring strip 100 have a diameter of 0.3125 inches (7.938 mm) and a dimple height of 127 of 0.0626 inches (1.5875 mm). The face dimples 125 are arranged in a regular grid pattern with a dimple spacing 126 of 0.5625 inches (14.288 mm) along both the length and the width of the face 120. Thus, the face dimples 125 may cover 20%-28% of the face 120. The leg dimples 115 are similarly spaced at 0.5625 inches (14.288 mm) along the length of the legs 110. The web openings 135 are oval, elliptical, or obround, having a total length (e.g., a dimension along the length of the furring strip 100) of 1.125 inches (28.575 mm) and a height (e.g., a dimension normal to the length and in the plane of the web 130) of 0.275 inches (6.985 mm), with adjacent web openings 135 being spaced 1 inch (25.4 mm) apart along the length of the web 130. The web openings 135 of each web 130 may be positioned and/or sized to correspond to the web openings 135 of the opposing web 130 so as to facilitate drainage of water through both webs 130 when the furring strip 100 is installed horizontally. These dimensions represent a single example configuration.

Referring now to FIGS. 2A-2D, a second embodiment of a furring strip 200 similarly comprises two legs 210, a face 220, and two webs 230 connecting the legs 210 and the face 220. The furring strip 200 is substantially similar in structure and function to the furring strip 100 depicted in FIGS. 1A-1D, including spaced leg dimples 215 and face dimples 225 arranged in an array of four rows. Unlike the furring strip 100 of FIGS. 1A-1D, the face dimples 225 of the furring strip 200 are arranged in a plurality of offset rows, wherein each row is displaced along the length of the furring strip 200, relative to each adjacent row, e.g., by 0.140625 inches (3.57 mm). As the lengthwise dimple spacing 226 of the face dimples 225 is 0.5625 inches (14.288 mm), the offset between adjacent rows results in a configuration in which no two face dimples 225 are centered on a line along the width of the furring strip 200.

Similar to the furring strip 100 of FIGS. 1A-1D, the furring strip 200 can comprise a metal such as steel. For example, the furring strip 200 can be made of a sheet steel having a width between 20 gauge and 16 gauge, and can be manufactured by rolling, extruding, pressing, or the like. In some embodiments, the furring strip 200 is manufactured by producing the dimples 215, 225 and punching the web openings 235 into a strip of sheet steel, and then forming the pre-textured and pre-punched strip into the final channel shape using a roll form or the like.

FIGS. 3A-3D depict a third embodiment of a furring strip 300 incorporating drainage functionality similar to the furring strips 100, 200 described above. The furring strip 300 includes legs 310, a face 320, and webs 330 connecting the legs 310 and the face 320. The face 320 includes face dimples 325 in a regular array configuration. Similar to the furring strip 100 of FIGS. 1A-1D, the face dimples 325 have a diameter of 0.3125 inches (7.938 mm) and are spaced along the length and width of the face 320 at 0.5625 inches (14.288 mm).

The furring strip 300 has a total height (as measured from the inner surface 310b of the legs 310 to the center of the protrusion 325a of the face dimples 325) of 0.375 inches (9.525 mm). The face dimples 325 have a height of 0.125 inches (3.175 mm). Due to the relatively shorter height of the webs 330 relative to the webs 130, 230 of FIGS. 1A-2D, web openings 335 of the furring strip 300 have a length of 1.125 inches (28.575 mm) and a height of 0.071 inches (1.8034 mm).

In some embodiments, such as the furring strip 300 shown in FIGS. 3A-3D, the legs 310 of the furring strip 300 are substantially flat and do not include leg dimples as shown in

FIGS. 1A-2D. In such embodiments, the inner surface 310b of the legs 310 is positioned directly against a building substrate when installed, and drainage occurs primarily through the web openings 335 and face dimples 325.

FIGS. 4A-4D depict a fourth embodiment of a furring strip 400. The furring strip 400 includes legs 410, a face 420, and webs 430 disposed between the legs 410 and the face 420.

Similar to the furring strip 100 depicted in FIGS. 1A-1D, the furring strip 400 has a height of 0.75 inches (19.05 mm) with a dimple diameter of 0.3125 inches (7.938 mm) and a dimple height of 0.0626 inches (1.5875 mm). As compared to the furring strip 100 of FIGS. 1A-1D, the furring strip 400 has a relatively larger dimple spacing, with face dimples 425 spaced 0.84 inches (21.336 mm) apart along the width of the face 420, and 1 inch (25.4 mm) apart along the length of the face 420.

Accordingly, each row of face dimples 425 (e.g., along the width of the face 420) is a row of 3 dimples, rather than 4 dimples as in the furring strip 100 of FIGS. 1A-1D. Accordingly, the face dimples 425 may cover 16%-20% of the face 420. The spacing of leg dimples 415 can be independent of the face dimple 425 spacing, and may be the same or different from the leg dimple 415 spacing of FIGS. 1A-1D.

In some embodiments, such as the example furring strip 400, apertures 413, 423 can be provided in the legs 410 and face 420 respectively, to accommodate mechanical fasteners for securing the furring strip 400 to a building substrate or cladding article. Apertures 413, 423 may be desirable, for example, where relatively thick materials are used in the construction of the furring strip 400.

FIGS. 5A-5D depict a fifth embodiment of a furring strip 500. The furring strip 500 includes legs 510 including apertures 413 for mechanical fasteners, a face 520 including face dimples 525 and apertures 523 for mechanical fasteners, and webs 530 disposed between the legs 510 and the face 520, the webs 530 including web openings 535. Similar to the furring strip 400 depicted in FIGS. 4A-4D, the furring strip 500 has a height of 0.75 inches (19.05 mm) with a dimple diameter of 0.3125 inches (7.938 mm) and a dimple height 127 of 0.0626 inches (1.5875 mm). Similar to the furring strip 300 depicted in FIGS. 3A-3D, the legs 510 of the furring strip 500 are substantially flat and do not include leg dimples. Thus, to achieve the same height as the furring strip 400 of FIGS. 4A-4D, the webs 530 may be longer relative to those of the furring strip 400.

In some embodiments, as shown for example in FIGS. 6A-6D, a furring strip 600 can have substantially flat legs 610 and a substantially flat face 620 without dimples. In such embodiments, drainage can occur primarily through web openings 635 in webs 630. In the example of FIGS. 6A-6D, the furring strip 600 has a height of 0.875 inches (22.225 mm). In some aspects, additional features of the profile of the furring strip 600 can include ridges 622 at lateral edges of the face 620 of the furring strip 600. The example furring strip 600 may optionally include apertures 613 and 623 to accommodate mechanical fasteners, as described with reference to previous examples above.

Referring now to FIGS. 7A-8B, example furring strip installation methods and configurations will be described. Although the furring strips 700, 800 depicted in FIGS. 7A-8B are consistent with the furring strip 400 depicted and described with reference to FIGS. 4A-4D, it will be appreciated that the configurations and methods of FIGS. 7A-8B can equally be implemented with any of the other furring strip embodiments depicted and described herein, for example, with reference to FIGS. 1A-3D and 5A-6D.

As shown in FIGS. 7A and 7B, an example structural furring system 750 includes one or more furring strips 700 attached in a horizontal orientation to a building substrate 760. In various embodiments, the building substrate can include one or more of studs or other horizontal or vertical framing members, a planar exterior sheathing such as plywood or oriented strand board (OSB), a housewrap or other weather-resistant material, or any other building material to which an interior or exterior cladding is to be applied. In the example structural furring system 750, the building substrate comprises vertically oriented studs in a laterally spaced configuration, for example, along an exterior wall of a building.

Conveniently, and in contrast to existing vertically oriented furring, the furring strips 700 can be mounted in a horizontal configuration as shown in FIGS. 7A-7B. In a horizontal configuration, the furring strips 700 can be mounted at any desired spacing, and can be fastened equally to the building substrate 760 by mechanical fasteners 765 for any stud spacing. As shown in FIGS. 7A-7B, each furring strip 700 includes legs 710 which are fastened to the building substrate 760 such that a face 720 of the furring strip 700 is spaced outward from the building substrate 760.

With reference to FIGS. 8A-8B, a rain screen system 850 can further include one or more exterior cladding articles 870 secured to a building substrate 860 by furring strips 800. As in the structural furring system 750 of FIGS. 7A-7B, the furring strips 800 are fastened to the building substrate 860 by mechanical fasteners 865, such as screws, nails, or the like. Exterior cladding articles 870, for example, fiber cement cladding panels, vinyl cladding panels, or the like, can then be fastened to the furring strips 800 by mechanical fasteners 875 such as nails, screws, or the like, to create an air gap 855 as part of the rain screen system 850. Because mechanical fasteners 875 are configured to secure an exterior cladding article 870 to a furring strip 800, while mechanical fasteners 865 are configured to secure a furring strip 800 to a building substrate 860, it will be appreciated that mechanical fasteners 875 can be similar or different from mechanical fasteners 865, based at least in part on the materials comprising the building substrate 860, the furring strips 800, and the cladding articles 870.

With continued reference to FIGS. 8A-8B, an example method of installing a cladding will now be described. The method begins by placing a first furring strip 800 in a desired position for installation with the legs 810 and/or leg dimples 815 adjacent to the building substrate 860. The first furring strip 800 can then be secured to the building substrate 860, for example, by a plurality of mechanical fasteners 865 such as nails or screws, which may be driven through the legs 810 between the leg dimples 815 and/or through apertures within the legs 810. Further furring strips 800 may then be installed at a desired spacing to yield a configuration similar to the system 750 depicted in FIGS. 7A and 7B. When a plurality of furring strips 800 have been installed, one or more exterior cladding articles 870 are obtained. A first one of the exterior cladding articles 870 is placed into a desired position for installation, with an inner surface of the first exterior cladding article 870 adjacent to the face 820 and/or face dimples 825 of the furring strips 800. The first exterior cladding article 870 can then be secured to the furring strips 800, for example, by one or more mechanical fasteners 875 such as nails or screws, with may be driven through the face 820 and/or through apertures 823 within the face 820. Further exterior cladding articles 870 may then be installed at a desired spacing and/or adjacent to the first exterior cladding article 870 to yield a completed rain screen system 850.

Referring now to FIG. 9A, in some embodiments, drainage functionality can be achieved by the application of a drainage layer 980a, such as an adhesive tape, to a furring strip 900 that has a substantially flat face 920 and substantially flat legs 910. In various embodiments, the furring strip 900 can be a lineal metallic strip, for example, a commercially profile such as a hat channel, furring channel, u channel, or the like. In other embodiments, the furring strip 900 can be a wooden furring strip having a generally rectangular cross-sectional profile. Similar to the furring strip 600 of FIGS. 6A-6D, the example furring strip 900 of FIG. 9A includes ridges 922 at lateral edges of the face 920 adjacent to webs 930. Accordingly, the drainage layer 980a can advantageously allow existing vertical furring materials to be mounted in a horizontal configuration, thereby providing more flexible installation configurations.

The example drainage layer 980a depicted in FIG. 9A comprises an adhesive tape including an inner surface 985 at least partially coated with a chemical adhesive, such as a glue, and a substantially planar outer surface 990 having one or more drainage features included thereon. For example, in FIG. 9A, the drainage features are generally round dimples 995a configured to provide a capillary break similar to the dimples depicted previously in FIGS. 1A-8B. A removable backing 987 can be coupled to the inner surface 985 to protect the chemical adhesive on the inner surface 985, and removed before attachment to the furring strip 900. Thus, when the drainage layer 980a is coupled to the face 920 of the furring strip 900, the resulting combination is a furring strip 900 with integrated drainage functionality similar to other furring strip embodiments described herein.

Referring now to FIGS. 9B-9G, a variety of shapes and configurations of drainage features can be implemented with the adhesive drainage layers described herein. For example, the outer surface 990 of a drainage layer 980b as shown in FIG. 9B includes drainage features 995b in the form of square or diamond-shaped protrusions from the outer surface 990.

In a further example, as shown in FIG. 9C, a drainage layer 980c includes drainage features 995c comprising oval, elliptical, or obround protrusions from the upper surface 990. The drainage features 995c are oriented along the width of the outer surface 990, such that a vertical drainage channel is created when the furring strip 900 (FIG. 9A) is installed in a horizontal configuration between a building substrate and a cladding article.

Referring now to FIG. 9D, a drainage layer 980d includes oval, elliptical, or obround drainage features 995d similar to the drainage features 995c depicted in FIG. 9C. In the drainage layer 980d, the drainage features 995d are oriented diagonally on the outer surface 990.

Thus, a furring strip 900 (FIG. 9A) with the drainage layer 980d can be installed in either a horizontal or vertical configuration while still creating a diagonally downward drainage channel adjacent to an installed cladding article.

FIG. 9E depicts an alternative embodiment of a drainage layer 980e including drainage features 995e in the form of alternating thicker and thinner portions of the drainage layer 980. The drainage features 995e are oriented along the width of the outer surface 990, such that a vertical drainage channel is created when the furring strip 900 (FIG. 9A) is installed in a horizontal configuration between a building substrate and a cladding article.

Referring jointly to FIGS. 9F and 9G, drainage layers 980f, 980g for application with furring strips 900 (FIG. 9A) can include drainage features 995f, 995g of different heights, for example, based on the furring strips 900 to be used with the drainage layers 980f, 980g. The drainage features 995g of FIG. 9G are relatively taller than the drainage features 995f of FIG. 9F. Thus, the drainage layer 980g will generally create a wider drainage and ventilation channel when installed with a cladding article, relative to the drainage layer 980f. Accordingly, in some implementations, it may be desirable to use the drainage layer 980g with a wood furring strip or a furring strip 900 as depicted in FIG. 9A, which does not have any integrated drainage functionality, and to use the drainage layer 980f with a furring strip that already includes limited drainage and/or ventilation functionality (e.g., the furring strip 600 depicted in FIGS. 6A-6D, which has web openings 638 but no drainage features on the legs 610 or face 620).

Wind Load Deformation Testing

Wind load capacity is determined by calculating the applied load capacity in accordance with ASTM E-330, “The Standard Test Method for Structural Performance of Exterior Windows, Doors, Skylights and Curtain Walls by Uniform Static Air Pressure Difference.” The test measures the uniform static air pressure difference, inward and outward for which the building system and/or rainscreen system are designed to withstand under load conditions. The test monitors the displacement or change in dimensions of the system after the applied load has been removed. In accordance with the test, a series of wind load model deformation tests were carried out to determine the ability of the various furring strip configurations to withstand an outward loading consistent with expected wind load conditions. In a first set of model tests, the model furring strips 100, 200, and 300, and an existing commercially available hat channel strip, were each fastened to two studs spaced 24 inches (0.6096 m) apart, with two fasteners securing each furring strip to each stud. The four strips were then loaded at 20 lbf (88.96 N) outward from the center of each strip midway between the two studs, simulating the outward force of wind loading created at the fastening point of a cladding panel fixed to the furring strips. The maximum outward deformation of each strip due to the outward loading was measured, as presented below in Table 1.

TABLE 1 Results of wind load deformation tests of example furring strips 100, 200, 300 relative to commercially available furring without drainage. Maximum Deformation Commercially Available Hat Channel 0.010 inches (0.254 mm)  Furring Strip 100 0.013 inches (0.3302 mm) Furring Strip 200 0.014 inches (0.3556 mm) Furring Strip 300 0.057 inches (1.448 mm) 

In a second set of model tests, the furring strips 400, 500, 600, were tested, along with an example commercially available hat channel, in accordance with the ASTM E-330 standard test for wind load resistance. Each of model furring strips 400, 500, and 600 was made from 16 ga steel, and a 20 ga version of strip 400 was additionally tested. Thus, each model furring strip 400, 500, 600, and the commercially available hat channel, were fixed to two studs spaced 24 inches (0.6096 m) apart. Each model furring strip was subjected to test loads of 35 lbf (155.7 N) and 44.4 lbf (195.7 N), at a single point centered on the furring strip and between the studs. For the 35 lbf test load, 6D common nails were used at the load location; for the 44.4 lbf test load, no. 8 screws were used at the load location. Each model furring strip was then further tested with seven test loads of 35 lbf (155.7 N) spaced evenly between the studs at 4 inches (10.16 cm), again using 6D common nails, and with three loads of 44.4 lbf (195.7 N) spaced evenly between the studs at 8 inches (20.32 cm), again using no. 8 screws. The maximum deformation was measured as presented below in Table 2.

TABLE 2 Results of wind load deformation tests of example furring strips 400, 500, 600 relative to commercially available furring without drainage. 1 × 35 lbf 1 × 44.4 lbf 7 × 35 lbf 3 × 44.4 lbf Max. Max. Max. Max. Deflection Deflection Deflection Deflection Commercial 0.019 inches 0.023 inches 0.058 inches 0.041 inches Hat Channel (0.4826 mm) (0.5842 mm) (1.4732 mm) (1.041 mm) Furring 0.025 inches 0.031 inches 0.072 inches 0.051 inches Strip 400 (0.635 mm) (0.7874 mm) (1.8288 mm) (1.2954 mm) Strip 400, 0.041 inches 0.052 inches 0.110 inches 0.083 inches 20ga (1.041 mm) (1.3208 mm) (2.794 mm) (2.1082 mm) Furring 0.024 inches 0.030 inches 0.068 inches 0.049 inches Strip 500 (0.6096 mm) (0.762 mm) (1.7272 mm) (1.2446 mm) Furring 0.021 inches 0.026 inches 0.063 inches 0.046 inches Strip 600 (0.5334 mm) (0.6604 mm) (1.6002 mm) (1.1684 mm)

Thus, as shown by the wind load deformation testing results above, various embodiments of the furring strips provided herein can provide substantially improved flexibility and/or customizability of cladding installation configurations, while maintaining satisfactory drainage and resistance to wind load deformation.

Certain features that are described in this disclosure in the context of separate implementations can also be implemented in combination in a single implementation. Conversely, various features that are described in the context of a single implementation can also be implemented in multiple implementations separately or in any suitable subcombination. Moreover, although features may be described above as acting in certain combinations, one or more features from a claimed combination can, in some cases, be excised from the combination, and the combination may be claimed as any subcombination or variation of any subcombination.

Moreover, while methods may be depicted in the drawings or described in the specification in a particular order, such methods need not be performed in the particular order shown or in sequential order, and that all methods need not be performed, to achieve desirable results. Other methods that are not depicted or described can be incorporated in the example methods and processes. For example, one or more additional methods can be performed before, after, simultaneously, or between any of the described methods. Further, the methods may be rearranged or reordered in other implementations. Also, the separation of various system components in the implementations described above should not be understood as requiring such separation in all implementations, and it should be understood that the described components and systems can generally be integrated together in a single product or packaged into multiple products. Additionally, other implementations are within the scope of this disclosure.

Conditional language, such as “can,” “could,” “might,” or “may,” unless specifically stated otherwise, or otherwise understood within the context as used, is generally intended to convey that certain embodiments include or do not include, certain features, elements, and/or steps. Thus, such conditional language is not generally intended to imply that features, elements, and/or steps are in any way required for one or more embodiments.

Conjunctive language such as the phrase “at least one of X, Y, and Z,” unless specifically stated otherwise, is otherwise understood with the context as used in general to convey that an item, term, etc. may be either X, Y, or Z. Thus, such conjunctive language is not generally intended to imply that certain embodiments require the presence of at least one of X, at least one of Y, and at least one of Z.

Although making and using various embodiments are discussed in detail below, it should be appreciated that the description provides many inventive concepts that may be embodied in a wide variety of contexts. The specific aspects and embodiments discussed herein are merely illustrative of ways to make and use the systems and methods disclosed herein and do not limit the scope of the disclosure. The systems and methods described herein may be used for mounting cladding articles to building substrates and are described herein with reference to this application. However, it will be appreciated that the disclosure is not limited to this particular field of use.

Some embodiments have been described in connection with the accompanying drawings. The figures are drawn to scale, but such scale should not be limiting, since dimensions and proportions other than what are shown are contemplated and are within the scope of the disclosed inventions. Distances, angles, etc. are merely illustrative and do not necessarily bear an exact relationship to actual dimensions and layout of the devices illustrated. Components can be added, removed, and/or rearranged. Further, the disclosure herein of any particular feature, aspect, method, property, characteristic, quality, attribute, element, or the like in connection with various embodiments can be used in all other embodiments set forth herein. Additionally, it will be recognized that any methods described herein may be practiced using any device suitable for performing the recited steps.

While a number of embodiments and variations thereof have been described in detail, other modifications and methods of using the same will be apparent to those of skill in the art. Accordingly, it should be understood that various applications, modifications, materials, and substitutions can be made of equivalents without departing from the unique and inventive disclosure herein or the scope of the claims.

Claims

1. A furring strip for mounting a wall cladding article to a building substrate, the furring strip comprising:

a substantially planar face defined generally by a length and a width, the substantially planar face comprising a first edge and a second edge opposite the first edge along the width;
a plurality of substantially planar webs, each substantially planar web extending from the first edge or the second edge of the substantially planar face; and
a plurality of substantially planar legs parallel to the substantially planar face, each substantially planar leg extending from one of the plurality of substantially planar webs at an end opposite the substantially planar face;
wherein the substantially planar face comprises a plurality of protrusions configured to produce one or more drainage channels between the substantially planar face and a cladding article secured to the substantially planar face, said drainage channels defining at least one gravity-assisted fluid flow path when the furring strip is mounted in a horizontal or vertical orientation.

2. A furring strip as claimed in claim 1, wherein each of the plurality of substantially planar legs comprises a plurality of protrusions configured to produce one or more drainage channels between the substantially planar legs and a building substrate secured to the substantially planar legs.

3. A furring strip as claimed in claim 1 or claim 2, wherein the protrusions comprise an array of dimples extending from an outer side of the substantially planar face.

4. A furring strip as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein the dimples are arranged in a rectangular array on the substantially planar face with a spacing of at least 0.25 inches (6.35mm) and not greater than approximately 1 inch (2.54 cm) between adjacent dimples.

5. A furring strip as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein the dimples extend to a height of between approximately 0.03125 inches (0.7938mm) and approximately 0.25 inches (6.35mm) relative to the outer side of the substantially planar face.

6. A furring strip as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein each of the substantially planar webs comprises a plurality of openings extending through the substantially planar web to accommodate water or air flow through the substantially planar web.

7. A furring strip as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein each of the openings has a width between approximately 0.1 inches (2.54mm) and approximately 0.3 inches (7.62mm), and a length between approximately 0.5 inches (1.27 cm) and 1.5 inches (3.81 cm).

8. A furring strip as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein the furring strip comprises rolled sheet steel having a thickness of at least 20 gauge and not greater than 16 gauge.

9. A furring strip as claimed in any one of the preceding claims, wherein a wind load of approximately 44.4 lbf (195.7 N) at two or more fastening points along the substantially planar face produces a deflection between 0 and //240 inches, where / is the span distance, expressed in inches (//609.6 cm when expressed in cm), between the fastening points.

10. A wall cladding system having a multifunction structural furring,

the wall cladding system comprising a furring strip as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 9 and at least one wall cladding panel, wherein the furring strip is mounted to the exterior of a building substrate such that the substantially planar legs abut the building substrate; and at least one wall cladding panel mounted to the furring strip such that the plurality of protrusions of the substantially planar face abut the wall cladding panel; wherein an inner surface of the wall cladding panel, the outer side of the substantially planar face, and two or more of the protrusions of the substantially planar face define a first gravity-assisted drainage flow path.

11. A wall cladding system having a multifunction structural furring,

the wall cladding system comprising a furring strip as claimed in any one of claims 2 to 9 and at least one wall cladding panel, wherein the furring strip is mounted to the exterior of a building substrate such that the plurality of protrusions of the substantially planar legs abut the building substrate; and the at least one wall cladding panel is mounted to the furring strip such that the plurality of protrusions of the substantially planar face abut the wall cladding panel; wherein an inner surface of the wall cladding panel, the outer side of the substantially planar face, and two or more of the protrusions of the substantially planar face define a first gravity-assisted drainage flow path; and wherein the building substrate, the inner sides of the substantially planar legs, and two or more of the protrusions of the substantially planar legs define a second gravity-assisted drainage flow path.

12. An adhesive drainage tape for a furring strip, the adhesive tape comprising:

a substantially planar tape defined generally by a length, a width, an inner surface, and an outer surface, the inner surface at least partially coated with a chemical adhesive; and
an array of protrusions extending from the outer surface, the protrusions generally defined by a height relative to the outer surface and a spacing between adjacent protrusions;
wherein the adhesive tape is configured to be fixed by the chemical adhesive to a substantially flat face surface of a structural furring strip before an exterior cladding article is coupled to the furring strip such that, when the exterior cladding article is coupled to the furring strip, a gravity-assisted drainage flow path is defined by an inner surface of the wall cladding panel, the outer surface of the tape, and two or more of the protrusions.

13. An adhesive drainage tape as claimed in claim 12, wherein the protrusions are arranged in a rectangular array on the outer surface with a spacing of at least 0.25 inches (6.35mm) and not greater than approximately 1 inch (2.54 cm) between adjacent protrusions.

14. An adhesive drainage tape as claimed in any one of claim 12 or claim 13, wherein the protrusions extend to a height of between approximately 0.03125 inches (0.7938mm) and approximately 0.25 inches (6.35mm) relative to the outer surface.

15. An adhesive drainage tape as claimed in any one of claims 12 to 14, wherein the protrusions extend to a height of between approximately 0.0625 inches (1.587mm) and approximately 0.125 inches (3.175mm) relative to the outer surface.

16. An adhesive drainage tape as claimed in any one of claims 12 to 15, wherein the protrusions comprise dimples having a circular cross-section.

17. An adhesive drainage tape as claimed in any one of claims 12 to 15, wherein the width of the adhesive tape is selected to fit against a face of a hat channel furring strip.

Patent History
Publication number: 20200362574
Type: Application
Filed: Mar 29, 2018
Publication Date: Nov 19, 2020
Inventors: Chad Diercks (Yucaipa, CA), Benjamin Batres (Fontana, CA), Michael McEndree (Akron, CA), David Shaw (Seattle, WA), Jose Gonzalez (Corona, CA)
Application Number: 16/603,201
Classifications
International Classification: E04F 19/06 (20060101); E04B 1/26 (20060101); E04B 1/70 (20060101); E04F 13/00 (20060101); E04F 13/08 (20060101);