Analyte Monitoring System and Methods for Managing Power and Noise

- Abbott Diabetes Care Inc.

Disclosed herein are methods and systems for conserving energy of a power source of an analyte monitoring device, including entering a power saving mode based on at least one of a temperature level of a power source, a level of power of a power source, or an amount of power needed by at least one component. Also disclosed herein are methods and systems for reducing noise during data transmissions to and from the analyte monitoring device.

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Description
BACKGROUND

Diabetes Mellitus is an incurable chronic disease in which the body does not produce or properly utilize insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that regulates blood sugar (glucose). In particular, when blood sugar levels rise, e.g., after a meal, insulin lowers the blood sugar levels by facilitating blood glucose to move from the blood into the body cells. Thus, when the pancreas does not produce sufficient insulin (a condition known as Type I Diabetes) or does not properly utilize insulin (a condition known as Type II Diabetes), the blood glucose remains in the blood resulting in hyperglycemia or abnormally high blood sugar levels.

The vast and uncontrolled fluctuations in blood glucose levels in people suffering from diabetes cause long-term, serious complications. Some of these complications include blindness, kidney failure, and nerve damage. Additionally, it is known that diabetes is a factor in accelerating cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), leading to stroke, coronary heart disease, and other diseases. Accordingly, one important and universal strategy in managing diabetes is to control blood glucose levels.

The first step in managing blood glucose levels is testing and monitoring blood glucose levels by using conventional techniques, such as drawing blood samples, applying the blood to a test strip, and determining the blood glucose level using colorimetric, electrochemical, or photometric test meters. Another more recent technique for monitoring blood glucose levels is by using a continuous or automatic glucose monitoring system. Unlike conventional blood glucose meters, continuous analyte monitoring systems employ an insertable or implantable sensor, which continuously detects and monitors blood glucose levels. These blood glucose levels may then be displayed to a user to assist the user in managing the user's diabetes. However, as battery life drains from one or more components of the continuous analyte monitoring system, such as a receiver, data corresponding to the monitored blood glucose levels may be lost or become corrupt if the receiver of the analyte monitoring system shuts down due to lack of power in a rechargeable power source of the receiver. Additionally, noise produced by various components of the analyte monitoring system may interfere with a signal that conveys the monitored blood glucose levels.

INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

The following patents, applications and/or publications are incorporated herein by reference for all purposes: U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,545,382; 4,711,245; 5,262,035; 5,262,305; 5,264,104; 5,320,715; 5,356,786; 5,509,410; 5,543,326; 5,593,852; 5,601,435; 5,628,890; 5,820,551; 5,822,715; 5,899,855; 5,918,603; 6,071,391; 6,103,033; 6,120,676; 6,121,009; 6,134,461; 6,143,164; 6,144,837; 6,161,095; 6,175,752; 6,270,455; 6,284,478; 6,299,757; 6,338,790; 6,377,894; 6,461,496; 6,503,381; 6,514,460; 6,514,718; 6,540,891; 6,560,471; 6,579,690; 6,591,125; 6,592,745; 6,600,997; 6,605,200; 6,605,201; 6,616,819; 6,618,934; 6,650,471; 6,654,625; 6,676,816; 6,730,200; 6,736,957; 6,746,582; 6,749,740; 6,764,581; 6,773,671; 6,881,551; 6,893,545; 6,932,892; 6,932,894; 6,942,518; 7,041,468; 7,167,818; 7,299,082; 7,740,581; 7,811,231; 7,811,430; 7,846,311; 7,802,467; 7,822,557; 7,885,698; 7,866,026; 7,887,682; 7,895,740; 7,918,975; 8,219,173; 8,298,389; 8,346,335; 8,595,607; 8,771,183; 9,186,098; 9,215,992; 9,402,544; 9,795,326; U.S. Publication Nos. 2006/0091006; 2007/0095661; 2007/0233013; 2008/0081977; 72008/0161666; 2008/0267823; 2009/0294277; 2010/0213057, 2010/0326842; 2010/0198034; 2010/0230285.

SUMMARY

Embodiments described herein relate to systems and methods for selectively disabling components of an analyte monitoring device based on a percentage of power remaining in a power source of the analyte monitoring device. As such, the analyte monitoring device is configured to determine a temperature level of the power source of the analyte monitoring device, determine a level of power remaining in the power source of the analyte monitoring device, and selectively deactivate at least one component of the analyte monitoring device when at least one of the temperature levels of the power source reaches a predetermined temperature threshold or when the level of power remaining in the power source reaches a predetermined power threshold. Also disclosed herein are methods and systems for reducing noise caused by components of the analyte monitoring device during data transmission and/or reception.

These and other objects, features and advantages of the present disclosure will become more fully apparent from the following detailed description of the embodiments, the appended claims and the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A detailed description of various aspects, features, and embodiments of the subject matter described herein is provided with reference to the accompanying drawings, which are briefly described below. The drawings are illustrative and are not necessarily drawn to scale, with some components and features being exaggerated for clarity. The drawings illustrate various aspects and features of the present subject matter and may illustrate one or more embodiment(s) or example(s) of the present subject matter in whole or in part.

FIG. 1 illustrates a block diagram of a data monitoring and management system according to embodiments of the present disclosure;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a receiver unit according to embodiments of the present disclosure;

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a battery management feature of a receiver according to embodiments of the present disclosure;

FIG. 4 is a flow chart illustrating a method for determining whether a receiver is to enter a play dead mode according to embodiments of the present disclosure;

FIG. 5 is a state diagram of battery charge and discharge features of a receiver according to embodiments of the present disclosure;

FIG. 6 illustrates temperature and voltage conditions of a receiver entering a play dead mode according to embodiments of the present disclosure;

FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a portion of a receiver according to embodiments of the present disclosure;

FIG. 8 is a flow chart illustrating a method for reducing noise according to embodiments of the present disclosure; and

FIG. 9 is a state diagram of a power mode of a receiver according to embodiments of the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Before the present disclosure is described in detail, it is to be understood that this disclosure is not limited to particular embodiments described, as such may, of course, vary. It is also to be understood that the terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only, and is not intended to be limiting, since the scope of the present disclosure will be limited only by the appended claims.

Where a range of values is provided, it is understood that each intervening value, to the tenth of the unit of the lower limit unless the context clearly dictates otherwise, between the upper and lower limit of that range and any other stated or intervening value in that stated range, is encompassed within the disclosure. The upper and lower limits of these smaller ranges may independently be included in the smaller ranges as also encompassed within the disclosure, subject to any specifically excluded limit in the stated range. Where the stated range includes one or both of the limits, ranges excluding either or both of those included limits are also included in the disclosure.

Unless defined otherwise, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this disclosure belongs. Although any methods and materials similar or equivalent to those described herein can also be used in the practice or testing of the present disclosure, the preferred methods and materials are now described. All publications mentioned herein are incorporated herein by reference to disclose and describe the methods and/or materials in connection with which the publications are cited.

It must be noted that as used herein and in the appended claims, the singular forms “a”, “an”, and “the” include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise.

The publications discussed herein are provided solely for their disclosure prior to the filing date of the present application. Nothing herein is to be construed as an admission that the present disclosure is not entitled to antedate such publication by virtue of prior disclosure. Further, the dates of publication provided may be different from the actual publication dates which may need to be independently confirmed.

As will be apparent to those of skill in the art upon reading this disclosure, each of the individual embodiments described and illustrated herein has discrete components and features which may be readily separated from or combined with the features of any of the other several embodiments without departing from the scope or spirit of the present disclosure.

The figures shown herein are not necessarily drawn to scale, with some components and features being exaggerated for clarity.

Various exemplary embodiments of the analyte monitoring system and methods of the disclosure are described in further detail below. Although the disclosure is described primarily with respect to a glucose monitoring system, each aspect of the disclosure is not intended to be limited to the particular embodiment so described. Accordingly, it is to be understood that such description should not be construed to limit the scope of the disclosure, and it is to be understood that the analyte monitoring system can be configured to monitor a variety of analytes, as described below.

FIG. 1 illustrates a data monitoring and management system such as, for example, analyte (e.g., glucose) monitoring system 100 in accordance with embodiments of the present disclosure. In certain embodiments, the analyte monitoring system 100 may be a continuous monitoring system, a semi-continuous monitoring system, a discrete monitoring system or an on-demand monitoring system. The analyte monitoring system 100 includes a sensor 101, a transmitter unit 102 coupleable to the sensor 101, and a primary receiver unit 104 which is configured to communicate with the transmitter unit 102 via a bi-directional communication link 103. The primary receiver unit 104 may be further configured to transmit data to a data processing terminal 105 for evaluating the data received by the primary receiver unit 104. Moreover, the data processing terminal 105 in one embodiment may be configured to receive data directly from the transmitter unit 102 via a communication link which may optionally be configured for bi-directional communication. Accordingly, transmitter unit 102 and/or receiver unit 104 may include a transceiver.

Also shown in FIG. 1 is an optional secondary receiver unit 106 which is operatively coupled to the communication link and configured to receive data transmitted from the transmitter unit 102. Moreover, as shown in the Figure, the secondary receiver unit 106 is configured to communicate with the primary receiver unit 104 as well as the data processing terminal 105. Indeed, the secondary receiver unit 106 may be configured for bi-directional wireless communication with each or one of the primary receiver unit 104 and the data processing terminal 105. In one embodiment of the present disclosure, the secondary receiver unit 106 may be configured to include a limited number of functions and features as compared with the primary receiver unit 104. As such, the secondary receiver unit 106 may be configured substantially in a smaller compact housing or embodied in a device such as a wrist watch, pager, mobile phone, or Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), for example. Alternatively, the secondary receiver unit 106 may be configured with the same or substantially similar functionality as the primary receiver unit 104. The receiver unit may be configured to be used in conjunction with a docking cradle unit, for one or more of the following functions: placement by bedside, recharging, data management, night time monitoring, and/or bi-directional communication device.

In one aspect, sensor 101 may include two or more sensors each configured to communicate with transmitter unit 102. Furthermore, while only one, transmitter unit 102, communication link 103, and data processing terminal 105 are shown in the embodiment of the analyte monitoring system 100 illustrated in FIG. 1, in certain embodiments, the analyte monitoring system 100 may include one or more sensors, multiple transmitter units 102, communication links 103, and data processing terminals 105. Moreover, within the scope of the present disclosure, the analyte monitoring system 100 may be a continuous, semi-continuous, or a discrete monitoring system. In a multi-component environment, each device is configured to be uniquely identified by each of the other devices in the system so that communication conflict is readily resolved between the various components within the analyte monitoring system 100.

In one embodiment of the present disclosure, the sensor 101 is physically positioned in or on the body of a user whose analyte level is being monitored. The sensor 101 may be configured to continuously sample the analyte level of the user and convert the sampled analyte level into a corresponding data signal for transmission by the transmitter unit 102. In certain embodiments, the transmitter unit 102 may be physically coupled to the sensor 101 so that both devices are integrated in a single housing and positioned on the user's body. The transmitter unit 102 may perform data processing such as filtering and encoding on data signals and/or other functions, each of which corresponds to a sampled analyte level of the user, and in any event transmitter unit 102 transmits analyte information to the primary receiver unit 104 via the communication link 103. Additional detailed description of the continuous analyte monitoring system, its various components including the functional descriptions of the transmitter are provided in, but not limited to, U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,134,461, 6,175,752, 6,121,611, 6,560,471, and 6,746,582, and U.S. Patent Publication No. 2008/0278332 and elsewhere, the disclosures of each of which are incorporated by reference for all purposes.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a receiver 200 according to embodiments of the present disclosure. In certain embodiments, receiver 200 may be the primary receiver unit 104 (FIG. 1) or the secondary receiver unit 106 as described above. As illustrated in the block diagram, the receiver 200 includes an analyte test strip interface 201, (e.g., blood glucose test strip port), a radio frequency (RF) receiver 202, a user input mechanism 203 (e.g., one or more keys of a keypad, a touch-sensitive screen, a voice-activated input command unit etc.), a temperature detection section 204, and a clock 205, each of which is operatively coupled to a receiver processor 207. In certain embodiments, the receiver 200 also includes a power supply 206, such as, for example, a rechargeable battery, operatively coupled to a power conversion and monitoring section 208. Further, the power conversion and monitoring section are also coupled to the receiver processor 207. A receiver serial communication section 209, and an output 210, such as, for example a display, are each operatively coupled to the receiver processor 207. In certain embodiments and as briefly discussed above, the analyte monitoring system 100 is a continuous glucose monitoring system, and the test strip interface 201 includes a glucose level testing portion to manually receive a glucose test strip to determine the glucose level of a blood sample applied to the test strip. In response to receiving a test strip, the receiver 200 may be configured to output blood glucose information determined from the test strip on the display. Additionally, the test strip can be used to calibrate a sensor such as, for example sensor 101.

In accordance with an embodiment, the receiver 200 includes two sections. The first section is an analog interface section that is configured to communicate with the transmitter unit 102 via the communication link 103. In certain embodiments, the analog interface section may include an RF receiver and an antenna for receiving and amplifying the data signals from the transmitter unit 102, which are thereafter, demodulated with a local oscillator and filtered through a band-pass filter. The second section of the receiver is a data processing section which is configured to process the data signals received from the transmitter unit 102 such as by performing data decoding, error detection and correction, data clock generation, and data bit recovery.

In certain embodiments, various data processing functionalities are executed by the receiver 200 such as, for example, calibration of analyte levels received from the sensor 101 and the transmitter unit 102 and techniques for managing power and noise of the analyte monitoring system 100, based on the periodic transmission of data from the transmitter unit 102.

In certain embodiments, a receiver 200 has an operating mode which prevents a user from operating the receiver 200 or suspends or deactivates certain functionalities of the receiver during certain conditions. Such conditions may include a low battery level of the receiver 200, such as, for example, a low battery level that prompts hardware shutdown. Other conditions may include low or high operating temperatures of the receiver 200 that may cause data corruption or erroneous behavior if the receiver 200 were to continue operating under such conditions. As will be described in greater detail below, this suspended functionality mode is referred herein as a play dead mode. In play dead mode, the receiver 200 continues to run a main clock and perform certain internal operations to keep desired data updated and current. Such operations and/or data may include operations and data corresponding to sensor life, calibration, timing of the receipt of data packets and the like. Although certain operations remain active, other operations of the receiver 200 are suspended. In certain embodiments, the operations that are suspended include writing data to memory, such as, for example a flash memory of the receiver 200, outputting sounds such as alarms, tones and/or other notifications, displaying data on a display unit, or communicating commands to a remotely controlled device, such as, for example, a pump.

In certain embodiments, one or more processors of the receiver 200 utilize a battery monitoring algorithm which performs a charge counting routine when determining whether to enter the play dead mode. More specifically, the charge counting routine in certain embodiments includes determining an estimate corresponding to an amount of battery charge available on a well-functioning battery during the lifecycle of the receiver 200. In certain embodiments, the battery monitoring algorithm takes into account variations in batteries from different manufacturers as well as an estimate of degradation of the battery capacity due to aging over the lifetime of the battery.

Referring to FIG. 3, in certain embodiments, the battery monitoring algorithm and associated battery management and charging functionalities of the receiver 200 is performed by power management module 300. In certain embodiments, the power management module 300 is equivalent to power conversion and monitoring section 208 (FIG. 2) and includes a battery charger 310 and a fuel gauge 320. In one aspect, the power management module 300 is configured to prevent a power supply 206 (e.g., rechargeable battery) of the receiver 200 from charging when a detected temperature of the receiver 200 and/or the battery is not in safe operating range. In certain embodiments, the power management module 300 is configured to prevent the battery from being continuously charged after the battery has been charging for a maximum charging period (e.g., more than about 3 hours). In certain embodiments, when the remaining power level of a battery of the receiver 200 reaches a predetermined minimum threshold level, the power management module 300 is configured to cut off power to one or more processors of the receiver 200, which may suspend or deactivate various functionalities of the receiver 200.

For example, the receiver 200 may have a user interface processor 330 configured to process commands received from, and output data to, various user interface components 340. In certain embodiments, the user interface components 340 may include, one or more buttons disposed on a housing of the receiver 200, a display, such as, for example a touch sensitive display, a sound synthesizer, a vibration component, and/or a backlight. Although specific components are mentioned, it is contemplated that the receiver may include additional user interface components configured to enable a user to interact with the receiver 200. In certain embodiments, the user interface processor 330 is configured to interact with the various user interface components 340 including updating the display of the receiver 200, processing received glucose data, maintaining a log of historical information, operating the sound synthesizer and/or the vibration component, and/or interface with the power management module 300. In addition to the user interface processor 330, the receiver 200 may also include glucose engine processor 350 configured to receive and process analyte data received from a transmitter, such as, for example, transmitter unit 102 (FIG. 1) and/or data received from a test strip port 360. In certain embodiments, test strip port 360 may be equivalent to test strip interface 201 (FIG. 2). Depending on how much power each of the above mentioned processors are consuming, one or more operations or functionalities of the receiver 200 that are controlled by each of the above mentioned processors may be deactivated or suspended when entering the play dead mode.

In certain embodiments, the battery monitoring algorithm discussed above incorporates several design constraints and considerations. For example, one consideration is discharge of the battery of the receiver 200. In one aspect, the battery of the receiver 200 is a lithium-ion battery. As these types of batteries may be damaged when deeply discharged (e.g., discharging the battery below a certain percentage of the charge capacity of the battery), the power management module 300 may be configured to cut or reduce power to one or more processors of the receiver 200 when the battery voltage drops below a certain voltage minimum threshold (e.g., about 3.3V).

In certain embodiments, when the voltage remaining in the battery drops below a certain threshold, for example about 3.6V, the battery is considered an empty battery and the power management module 300 reduces or cuts power to one or more of the processors to conserve the remaining battery power. In such situations, and as described above, when the power management module 300 cuts power from the battery, certain functionalities of the receiver 200 are disabled while other functionalities of the receiver 200 may remain active. In one aspect, one or more processors of the receiver 200 may be configured to determine which components and/or operations (e.g. writing to flash memory, updating a display, etc.) controlled by a particular processor are consuming the most power. The processor may then deactivate one or more operations and/or components that are consuming the most power while other operations and/or components controlled by that processor remain active.

For example, the user interface processor 330 may control a display and a light source of the receiver 200. When battery power reaches the predetermined minimum threshold, the user interface processor 330 may determine that continued operation of the light source will require more power than operation of the display. As such, the light source will be deactivated until the battery of the receiver 200 is recharged, but the display remains active. Although one component controlled by a processor may remain active while another component is deactivated as was described above, it is contemplated that as battery power continues to drain, the active component (e.g., the active display) controlled by the user interface processor 330 may be subsequently deactivated when remaining power of the battery reaches a second predetermined minimum threshold. When this threshold is reached, the processor of the receiver 200 may again determine which active component and/or operation is consuming the most battery power and temporarily deactivate that particular component or operation.

In another aspect, temperature damage to the battery may also be prevented using the power management module 300. For example, a lithium-ion battery can be damaged if the battery is exposed to extreme temperatures, especially hot temperatures. Additionally, low battery temperature may cause the internal resistance of the battery to increase significantly. The increase in internal resistance results in a voltage drop when the device turns on high current loads such as, for example, when a display of the receiver 200 is activated or when an alarm is output. It is beneficial to avoid or prevent voltage drops of a battery because a voltage drop may cause the operating system of the receiver 200 to unexpectedly reset. As a result of the reset, data may be lost. In certain embodiments, the temperature of the battery is monitored while the battery is being charged. If the temperature of the battery exceeds a threshold temperature, the processor of the receiver 200 issues a command to temporarily discontinue charging the battery.

FIG. 4 illustrates a method 400 for determining whether a receiver, such as, for example, receiver 200 (FIG. 2) is to enter a play dead mode, according to embodiments of the present disclosure. Referring to FIG. 4, initially, a processor of the receiver 200 determines an amount of power or charge remaining in a power source of the receiver 200 (410). In certain embodiments, a processor of the receiver 200, such as, for example, a user interface processor 330 (FIG. 3), is configured to collect and maintain battery information, such as charge count information (e.g., an amount of power remaining in the battery), at any given time. In addition to determining the battery information, the user interface processor 330 of the receiver 200 may be configured to determine battery aging error. For example, due to the age of a battery, a small percentage of battery capacity may be lost during its usage. Accordingly, this error may be detected and the actual capacity of the battery based on the current age of the battery is updated. Thus, when the remaining charge level of the battery is determined, the determination is based on the current capacity of the aged battery rather than the capacity of the battery when it was new.

In certain embodiments, when the receiver 200 is powered on, the charge count of the battery is determined based on certain conditions. For example, if the receiver 200 is recovering from a hard or soft reset, battery information that was previously stored in a memory of the receiver 200 is checked to determine if the battery information is valid. Such a determination may be made by the processor comparing the stored battery information to an estimate of the remaining power in the power source. If the battery information stored in the memory is validated, the charge count of the battery is set as the battery information that is stored in the memory. In situations where the system is reset due to a power on procedure, such as, for example, powering on the receiver 200, the charge count stored in the memory is retrieved and checked for validity. If the battery information in memory is valid, the stored battery information is compared to an actual voltage reading from the battery. If the stored battery information is within a predetermined range, such as ±0.5V of the actual voltage read from the battery, the charge count of the battery is set to the value that was stored in the memory. In another aspect, if it is determined by the user interface processor 330 that the battery voltage is below a minimum threshold, such as 3.6V or less, the charge count is set to zero and the receiver 200 enters play dead mode and/or prompts the user to begin recharging the battery. If the stored battery information is invalid, the charge count is initialized to zero and the user is prompted, via a display or alarm notification, that the battery of the receiver 200 needs to be recharged.

In certain embodiments, the user interface processor 330 of the receiver 200 receives a charge count interrupt signal, and based on the signal, determines when the battery is being charged, when the battery is fully charged, and when power from the battery is being discharged. For example, when the charge count interrupt signal is received by the processor and the signal is high, the user interface processor 330 is configured to increment a charge count. However, when the charge count interrupt signal is received and the signal is low, the user interface processor 330 subtracts one charge count. Thus, based on the charge count, the user interface processor 330 may determine how much power remains in the battery and/or when the charge count has reached a maximum count.

In certain embodiments, the user interface processor 330 of the receiver 200 is configured to calculate and display an amount of power remaining in the battery of the receiver 200. As discussed above, when the remaining battery power reaches a predetermined minimum threshold level, the user interface processor 330 is configured to issue a command to output a notification to the user that the receiver 200 is about to enter the play dead mode because the remaining battery power is at or below a threshold power level. In another aspect, the user interface processor 330 is also configured to notify the user when the battery of the receiver 200 is fully charged. In certain embodiments, the display of the receiver 200 is configured to visually output the remaining power of the battery of the receiver 200. In certain embodiments, the remaining power of the battery of the receiver 200 is output in the form of an icon that displays an amount of power remaining in the battery. It also serves as an indication that all subsystems (e.g., test strip port functionality, display functionality, etc.) of the receiver 200 can be used without the risk of data loss or data corruption due to sudden or unexpected receiver 200 shutdown.

In certain embodiments, the battery icon is output on the display having at least four indicators with each of the indicators representing a portion of the battery life. Although four indicators are specifically mentioned, it is contemplated that any number of indicators may be used. As battery life of the receiver 200 drains, each of the indicators of the battery icon may be output in a different color. For example, as battery life is depleted from a 100% charge to a 75% charge, the user interface processor 330 of the receiver 200 causes the first indicator of the battery icon to change from green, to yellow to red to indicate that the user is reaching 75% charge while the remaining three indicators of the battery icon are output in green. As power of the battery of the receiver 200 is continually discharged, the remaining three indicators are output in different colors to indicate the percentage of power remaining in the battery. In certain embodiments, the battery icon may also indicate the level or percentage of power remaining in the battery in which the user may continue to use all systems and functionalities of the receiver 200, such as, for example, the display or the test strip port 360. Additionally, the battery icon may display whether the battery of the receiver 200 is charging.

Referring back to FIG. 4, once the user interface processor 330 has determined the amount of charge remaining in the battery of the receiver 200, the determined amount of charge is compared to a minimum predetermined power threshold level (420). If it is determined that the charge count of the battery is greater than the predetermined threshold, all subsystems and functionalities of the receiver remain active (450). However, if it is determined that the charge count of the battery is less than the predetermined threshold, the user interface processor 330 is configured to output a notification (430) that the receiver 200 will be entering the play dead mode and that some functionalities of the receiver 200 will be deactivated. In one aspect, the user interface processor 330 may be configured to determine which components of the receiver 200 are consuming the most power and selectively deactivate the identified components. Additionally, the notification may also indicate which components and/or operations of the receiver 200 will be deactivated when the play dead mode is entered.

In certain embodiments, various alarms or other notifications may be output from the receiver 200 to warn the user that the power remaining in the battery is reaching a threshold level (e.g., 25% power). In another embodiment, multiple warnings or alerts may be output based on certain battery levels being reached. For example, when the amount of power remaining in the battery reaches a first level, a user is warned that the battery needs to be charged within a determined amount of time based on current battery power consumption. When the remaining amount of power in the battery reaches a second level, the receiver 200 enters the play dead mode (440). In another embodiment, the user interface processor 330 of the receiver 200 is configured to estimate a time frame based on the current battery usage as to when the receiver 200 will enter the play dead mode. If the estimated amount of time elapses, the receiver 200 enters play dead mode (440).

Additional description of alarms and the output of the alarms and play dead mode for certain embodiments are shown in Table 1 below.

TABLE 1 Parameter Description Level Maximum Charge count The programmed battery capacity. 12,000 Level 0 threshold The battery percentage at which all 75%-100% charge percentage bars displayed in the UI. Level 1 threshold The battery percentage at which 3 bars 50%-75% charge percentage displayed in the UI. Level 2 threshold The battery percentage at which 2 bars 25%-50% charge percentage displayed in the UI. Level 3 threshold The battery percentage at which 1 bar 0%-25% charge percentage is displayed in the UI. Battery Low Alarm 1 The battery percentage at which the <25% charge percentage first low battery alarm displayed to the user. Battery Low Alarm 2 The battery percentage at which the <3.65 V or <15% percentage second low battery alarm displayed to charge the user. Battery Warn Voltage The battery voltage below which the 3.65 V battery low alarm should be raised. Battery Dead Voltage The battery voltage below which 3.6 V system should be placed in play dead state. Battery Self Test Voltage The battery voltage below which the 3.7 V self test (initiated by USB removal) will not be performed.

FIG. 5 is a state diagram of battery charge and discharge features of a receiver, such as, for example, receiver 200 (FIG. 2) according to embodiments of the present disclosure. As shown in FIG. 5, various states of the battery include an initial state 500, a battery charging state 505, a charge complete 510 state, a discharging state 515, and play dead state 520. Although specific states have been discussed, it is understood that additional states may be used to govern the power supply.

In certain embodiments, the battery remains in the charging state 505 when the receiver 200 is connected to a peripheral power source and the battery voltage and the receiver temperature are in a safe operation range. In the charging state 505, all operations and functionalities of the receiver 200 are operable except for test strip measurements and a user initiated self test of the receiver 200. In certain embodiments, a self test enables a user to select and run a self test mode in which the receiver 200 automatically tests whether various components of the receiver are working properly. Such components may include a display, a speaker, a memory, a vibratory indicator, and/or a test strip port light. After each successive test, the results may be audibly and/or visually output to a user. Although specific self tests have been mentioned, it is contemplated that additional self tests related to other components of the receiver may be performed.

As discussed above, when in the charging state 505, an icon may be output on the display to indicate that a battery of the receiver 200 is currently being charged. In one aspect, the receiver 200 enters the charge complete state 510 when the battery is completely charged and a USB cable is connected to the receiver 200. However, as stated above, although the receiver 200 may still be connected to a power source, when the fully charged state 510 is reached, the processor, such as, for example, the user interface processor 330 (FIG. 3) may be configured to cut off power to the battery so as not to overcharge the battery. As power from the battery is being discharged (e.g., 100% to 20% battery life remaining) all functionalities of the receiver 200 are active, such as was described above with reference to FIG. 4. Additionally, the display may be configured to graphically output the remaining battery power.

When battery life reaches about 20% to 0%, the receiver 200 enters the play dead mode 520 described above. In the play dead mode 520, certain functionalities of the receiver 200 are inoperable. State transitions illustrated in FIG. 5 are further described in Table 2 below.

TABLE 2 Transition From To Description 525 Discharging Charging The receiver is placed in USB cradle or connected to a USB cable, and the battery is being charged. 530 Charging Discharging The receiver is removed from USB cradle or disconnected from the USB cable and the system is operating with battery power. 535 Charging Charge The battery is fully charged. complete 540 Charge Discharging The battery is in a completely complete charged state and the receiver is removed from USB cradle or the USB cable is removed. 545 Init Play dead At reset when the USB is not connected and the battery voltage is less than “PLAY_DEAD_VOLTAGE” or the charge count is less than 20% of the actual capacity. 550 Init Charging At reset when the USB is connected. 555 Init Discharging At reset when the USB is not connected and the battery voltage is greater than “PLAY_DEAD_VOLTAGE” and the charge count is greater than 20% of the actual capacity. 560 Init Charge At reset when the USB is complete connected and the battery charging is not initiated within 3 seconds. 565 Discharging Play dead Charge count drops below the “PLAY_DEAD_VOLTAGE”.

Further aspects of the play dead mode are illustrated in FIG. 6. For example, in certain embodiments, the receiver 200 (FIG. 2) may be configured to enter play dead mode as a function of both voltage and temperature. An exemplary embodiment of the play dead mode is illustrated as the hatched region 600 of FIG. 6. For example, the receiver 200 enters the play dead mode at different minimum voltages depending upon the battery temperature. In one aspect, the receiver 200 may be configured to enter the play dead mode when one of two temperatures and corresponding minimum voltages are reached. For example, the two temperatures may be −5° C., and 0° C., and the two corresponding minimum voltages may be 3.6V and 3.7V. As indicated by solid black line 610, the receiver 200 enters the play dead mode if the battery temperature is less than a first temperature (e.g., −5° C.), regardless of the battery voltage. In another embodiment, the receiver 200 enters the play dead mode if the battery temperature is between the first and second temperatures (e.g., 0° C. and −5° C.) and the battery voltage is less than a first battery voltage (e.g., about 3.7V). If the battery temperature is greater than the second temperature (e.g., 0° C.) or if the voltage is less than the second battery voltage (e.g., 3.7V), the receiver 200 will also enter the play dead mode. It is understood that a fewer or greater number of battery temperature and voltage points may be selected, based upon the application (e.g., battery characteristics and power demands). Moreover, the battery temperature and voltages that cause the transition to the play dead mode may be selectable and/or customizable by the user or health care professional.

With continued reference to FIG. 6, alarms are provided as illustrated by the solid and dashed lines 620, 630, 640. As indicated by arrow 1, an alarm is output if the voltage of the battery is less than 3.75V and the battery temperature is between 0° C. and −5° C. (620). As indicated by arrow 3, an alarm is output if the voltage is less than 3.65V and the battery temperature is greater than 0° C. (640). As indicated by arrow 2, an alarm sounds if the battery temperature is less than 5° C. and the voltage is greater than 3.6V (630). An auto-recover mode is identified by the dashed lines (650). In certain embodiments, the receiver 200 is configured to automatically exit the play dead mode via the auto-recover mode when the processor detects that the voltage level of the battery exceeds 3.8V and/or the battery temperature exceeds 8° C.

In another aspect of the present disclosure, the receiver 200 may be configured to reduce the overall electronic noise of the receiver 200 during periods when data transmission is occurring, such as, for example, when the receiver 200 is expecting a data packet from a transmitter unit, such as, for example, transmitter unit 102 (FIG. 1). To accomplish the noise reduction, a processor of the receiver 200, such as, for example, user interface processor 330 (FIG. 3) is configured to temporarily reduce the functionality of at least one component of the receiver 200 during the transmission of signals from the transmitter unit 102.

One implementation of the noise reduction is referred to herein as the “quiet mode” in which the user interface processor 330 of the receiver 200 temporarily reduces the intensity of light from a display, such as an OLED display, of the receiver 200. During the RF packet reception, the light level of the display is reduced for a short period of time which significantly reduces the noise caused by the display and improves RF performance. This reduction in light is virtually imperceptible to the user due to the very short duration of time in which the light has been reduced. In some embodiments, the duration is about 15 to about 100 milliseconds and occurs once every 60 seconds or at time intervals that are determined based on, for example, expected time windows in which data packets are to be received from the transmitter unit 102.

Referring to FIG. 7, another implementation of noise reduction is to effectively disconnect an antenna of an RF receiver 202 (FIG. 2) of the receiver 200 (FIG. 2) using an antenna switch. As discussed herein, the signal generated by the sensor 101 is received from the transmitter unit 102 by an RF link, approximately once per minute. The RF reception signal path is from the antenna 710, through an antenna switch 720, into a transceiver 730. One purpose of the antenna switch 720 is to enable the antenna 710 to connect and disconnect to either the transmitter power amplifier or to the receiver 200. In certain embodiments, the antenna 710 is connected to the receiver 200 through the antenna switch 720 so as to enable the signal received from the transmitter unit 102 to be more accurate. A processor 740 (e.g., glucose engine processor 350 (FIG. 3)) of the receiver 200 controls the transceiver 730 and the antenna switch 720 in order to maximize noise reduction as will be described in greater detail below.

In certain embodiments, control of the antenna switch 710 is provided by at least one processor of the receiver 200, such as, for example, the glucose engine processor 350 (FIG. 3) described above. Other circuits on the receiver 200 that perform functions unrelated to data reception from the transmitter unit 102, such as, for example, the user interface processor 330, can generate RF noise that interferes with the signal. This circuitry is represented as local interference sources 750 in the block diagram.

In certain embodiments, the receiver 200 is sensitive to on channel signals at very low levels (e.g., about −110 dBm). However, this signal is desensitized by stronger signals such as, the local interference sources 750, even though the local interference sources 750 may not be on the same channel. As the local interference sources 750 are in close proximity to the antenna 710, the local interference sources 750 desensitize the RF receiver 202 and may corrupt the data received from the transmitter unit 102 or cause the data to be inaccurate.

FIG. 8 illustrates a method 800 for reducing noise according to embodiments of the present disclosure. Referring to FIG. 8, in certain embodiments, the method 800 described below may be used with components that were described above with respect to FIG. 7. The routine for reducing noise begins when the receiver, such as, for example, receiver 200 receives a sensor signal from the transmitter, such as, for example, transmitter unit 102 (810). In certain embodiments, the sensor signal is first received during the establishment of a transmission link between the receiver 200 and the transmitter unit 102 or the initial pairing of the receiver 200 and transmitter unit 102. When establishing the transmission link, a processor 740 (FIG. 7) of the receiver 200 activates a transceiver 730 and waits for the data packet to be transmitted from the transmitter unit 102. Typically, the data packet will arrive between 0 and 70 seconds after the transceiver 730 is activated. Although this range is specifically mentioned, it is contemplated that the data packet may arrive outside this time window, such as for example, after 70 seconds. In order to reduce the effects of local interference sources, the antenna switch 720 (FIG. 7) is used to effectively disconnect the antenna (820) from an RF receiver 202 (FIG. 2) of the receiver 200 which in turn reduces the effect of noise on the receiver 200. Because the RF receiver 202 is not using the antenna 710, the signal received from the transmitter unit 102 is attenuated by approximately 20 dB. Although the signal is attenuated by 20 dB, the local noise level is also reduced by 20 dB which prevents the noise from substantially interfering and desensitizing the RF receiver 202 resulting in a more accurate signal. Further, even though the signal is attenuated by 20 dB, the receiver 200 may be in close proximity to the transmitter unit 102 such that the signal attenuation is acceptable. Disconnecting the antenna 710 during the initial pairing not only reduces noise, but also helps establish a communication range between the receiver 200 and the transmitter unit 102 when the antenna 710 is not used.

Once the receiver 200 has received the first data packet and established a range of communication without the antenna 710 being used, the receiver 200 is configured to determine a window of time (830) in which the next data packet will arrive from the transmitter unit 102. In certain embodiments, the window of time is based on predetermined settings (e.g., once per minute). In another embodiment, the window of time may be selected by a user or health care professional. Once the time window is determined, the processor 740 activates the transceiver 730 for a short duration to receive the next data packet based on the determined window of time. During the determined window of time, a processor (e.g., glucose engine processor 350 (FIG. 3)) of the receiver 200 issues a command that causes one or more components (e.g., the local interference sources 750) of the receiver 200 to be deactivated (840) for a short period of time (e.g., 25 Msec) without substantially affecting the other operations of the receiver 200.

In certain embodiments, the processor 740 asserts a quiet host signal 700 during the determined time window to indicate to the rest of the circuitry that it should enter a low power mode. Additionally, if it is determined that the receiver 200 is within range of the transmitter unit 102 such that the antenna 710 is not needed, the processor 740 issues a command to the switch 720 to disable the antenna (850) during the transmission time window. As a result, the noise level is further reduced. In certain embodiments, the range may be a predetermined range based on the strength of the signal being transmitted from the transmitter unit 102 to the receiver 200. In another embodiment, the range is established during the initial pairing of the receiver 200 and the transmitter unit 102 while the antenna 710 of the receiver 200 has been disconnected as was described above. Further description of implementing a quiet mode can be found in, among others, U.S. Patent Publication No. 2009/0076359, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,801,582, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference for all purposes.

In certain embodiments, the quiet mode also refers to cessation of USB communication, such as, for example, communication between the receiver 200 and peripheral device, such as, for example, a remote computer. In one aspect, as will be described in detail below, the quiet mode also refers to the design of quiet mode blockers.

In certain embodiments, the receiver 200 may have several different power modes. Such modes include power saving modes in which the power of external devices such as sound chips and LCD controllers are turned off. In such modes, the power consumption of one or more processors of the receiver is maintained at a minimum level. In certain embodiments, at least one processor, such as, for example, the user interface processor 330 (FIG. 3) of the receiver 200 includes three modes to manage power consumption. In the first mode (e.g., a run mode), all components (e.g., a display, test strip port, flash memory, etc.) controlled by the user interface processor 330 are active. In this mode, power consumption is at a maximum rate. The second mode is a doze mode. In the doze mode, at least one processor of the receiver 200, such as, for example, the user interface processor 330 is essentially deactivated while a second processor, such as, for example, the glucose engine processor 350, enables required peripherals to run (e.g., calibration modules, internal clocks, etc.). In the stop mode, both of the processors of the receiver 200 are shut down and only a real time clock of the receiver 200 is active.

FIG. 9 is a state diagram machine that illustrates the various states of power management of a receiver 200 as was described above. These states include a “RUN_MODE” state 910, in which at least one processor of the receiver, such as, for example, a user interface processor 330 (FIG. 3) is in the run mode, referred to above. In the “STOP_MODE” state 920, the user interface processor 330 of the receiver 200 is in the stop mode as was described above. In the “QUIET_MODE” state 930, the timers of the operating system of the receiver 200 and most interrupts are disabled, and one or more processors of the receiver 200 are placed into the stop mode as was described above.

In certain embodiments, to reach the power saving function, the receiver 200 must verify that there are no pending instructions that need to be executed prior to entering the power saving state. As such, blockers are used to indicate if a task or other executable action is in process and has not yet been completed. In certain embodiments, each blocker is a flag. If all the blockers are released (e.g., no flags are set), the receiver 200 enters the play dead mode such as was described above. In certain embodiments, the receiver uses the following exemplary blockers as set forth in Table 3:

TABLE 3 Blocker Significance “BLOCKER_AUDIO” Set by audio task to indicate that the sound chip is playing. “BLOCKER_BACKLIGHT_PWM” Set by UI state machine to indicate that the back light is on now. “BLOCKER_WAKE_HOST” Set by “WAKE_HOST” signal. If this flag is locked, the glucose engine 490 communicates with UI processor 410 and UI cannot get into power saving mode. “BLOCKER_USB_IN” Set by “USB_IN” signal. If this flag is set, a cable is connected to USB port and ready for connecting to a PC. (Note: In some embodiments, the system uses “BLOCKER_USB_WALLBRICK” signal to indicate if the cable is connected.) “BLOCKER_USB_DATA” The UI is in the data session with a PC and cannot get into quiet mode or stop mode.

Referring back to FIG. 9, the transitions between the states, in certain embodiments, are illustrated and summarized in Table 4 below. After power to the receiver 200 is turned on, the receiver 200 enters the “RUN_MODE” state 910 (e.g., transition 905). The receiver 200 transitions from the “RUN_MODE” state 910 to the “STOP_MODE” state 920 (transition 915) when any of the blockers are not set and when a task is not scheduled to run. In entering the “STOP_MODE” state 920, at least one processor of the receiver 200 (e.g., the user interface processor 330) is deactivated and the receiver 200 enters the low power state.

TABLE 4 Transition From To Conditions Description 915 RUN STOP No blocker set and PLLs are turned there is no task off and the system scheduled to run enters the low power state. 925 STOP RUN Press of button on PLLs are turned receiver or on and system OS timer or resumes normal USB cable plug-in or power state. Interrupt from glucose engine 490 or Transition of the “QUIET_HOST” signal to “HIGH” or Transition of “HOST_AWAKE” signal to “HIGH” 935 RUN QUIET No blocker set PLLs are turned Transition of off and the OS “QUIET_HOST” timers stop. signal to “HIGH” 940 QUIET RUN Transition of PLLs are turned “QUIET_HOST” on and system signal to “LOW” resumes normal power state.

In one aspect, the receiver 200 is configured to transition from the “STOP_MODE” state 920 to the “RUN_MODE” state 910 (transition 925) under certain conditions. For example, an interrupt signal can “wake up” the user interface processor 330 after the user interface processor 330 has entered the play dead mode such that the user interface processor returns to normal operation. In certain embodiments, a press of a button on the receiver 200, an OS timer, a USB cable plug-in, and interrupt from the glucose engine processor 350, may wake up the deactivated user interface processor 330 so that receiver 200 runs in normal mode having all functionalities. In addition, the transition of the “QUIET_HOST” signal to “HIGH” by the glucose engine processor 350, or the transition of the “HOST_AWAKE” signal to “HIGH” will also transition the system from “STOP_MODE” state 920 to the “RUN_MODE” state 910.

Referring to the quiet mode 930, when in the quiet mode 930, the phase locked loops of each processor (e.g., the user interface processor 330 and the glucose engine processor 350) are shut down and clock 205 (FIG. 2) is stopped. The receiver 200 enters the “QUIET MODE” state 930 from the “RUN_MODE” state 910 when triggered by “QUIET_HOST” signal such as described above with reference to FIGS. 7 and 8. For example, the receiver 200 could transition to the “QUIET MODE” state 930, if and only if, the glucose engine processor 350 raises the “QUIET_HOST” signal (transition 935). The glucose engine processor 350 raises the “QUIET_HOST” signal just prior to reception of the RF packet from the transmitter unit 102, for example, once about every 50-70 seconds. In some embodiments, transmission occurs once about every 60 seconds±500 Msec. Once the receiver 200 has entered the quite mode 930, this mode will persist for a predetermined amount of time (e.g., about 100 Msec). When in the “QUIET_MODE” state 930, the falling edge of the “QUIET_HOST” transitions the receiver 200 out of the “QUIET_MODE” state 930 to the “RUN_MODE” state 910 (transition 940).

In certain embodiments, additional considerations are provided prior to the receiver entering the quiet mode. For example, if the system detects a USB connection when the system is in “QUIET_MODE” state 930, there will be no USB interrupt because the USB is disabled in quiet mode. If the user interface detects a “QUIET_HOST” rising edge during uploading of data to a PC through the USB port, this request from glucose engine processor 350 to quiet the system will be ignored.

There are occasions that continuous communications between the receiver 200 and an external device (e.g., a remote computer) are required for an extended period (e.g., for debugging, product engineering, hardware verification and validation, historical data upload, etc.). During such extended communications, it may be desirable to block the quiet mode entirely. Once the quiet mode is deactivated, communication between the remote computer and the receiver may occur. In certain embodiments, the communication link between the remote computer and receiver only occurs when data packets are not being received by the receiver. At the end of the period of time between packets, the PC application closes the communication link and waits for a signal which indicates that the packet transmission has been completed. In some embodiments, this process will continue as long as the PC application wants to communicate with the device. This technique may avoid the dangling and hanging of the PC application as a result of the receiver going to the quiet mode and shutting down the USB clock before the PC application closes the USB port.

In yet another embodiment, noise reduction techniques are also employed by placement of the antenna in relation to the noise generating circuits. In such embodiments, the antenna may be placed in an area so as to isolate the antenna from the noise source by being as far as physically possible from the noise source. Conversely, it is also contemplated that noise sources may be placed as far as possible from the antenna. Additional design features may be included to increase the isolation, such as ground planes, metal shields, and slots cut in the printed circuit board.

Additionally, it is contemplated that the antenna may be placed to improve signal strength by minimizing obstacles between the signal and antenna. Such considerations include hand placement positions when a user is holding the device as the user's hand may block the signal. Accordingly, the antenna may be placed on an outside edge that will not be covered by the hand of the user.

In the manner described above, an analyte monitoring device, such as, for example, a receiver, may be configured to enter an operating mode (e.g., a power conservation mode) in which certain functionalities and/or components of the analyte monitoring device are selectively disabled. In certain embodiments, this operating mode is entered when the remaining power of a power source of the analyte monitoring device has reached a predetermined minimum threshold level. In certain embodiments, the functionalities and/or components that are disabled are those components and/or functionalities that require the most battery power. Thus, disabling the components and/or functionalities that consume the most power may prolong the time before the analyte monitoring system shuts down due to lack of power which may result in the loss of data. Other conditions that may prompt the analyte monitoring device to enter the operating mode disclosed herein may include low or high operating temperatures of the analyte monitoring device that may cause data corruption or erroneous behavior if the analyte monitoring device were to continue operating under such conditions.

In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method is described in which one or more components of the analyte monitoring device are selectively deactivated during a time window in which the analyte monitoring device is to receive and/or transmit data. Because the one or more components are deactivated, the noise generated by those components is reduced which results in an enhanced and more accurate signal.

Certain aspects of the present disclosure may include determining a temperature level of a power source of an analyte monitoring device, determining a level of power remaining in the power source of the analyte monitoring device, and selectively deactivating at least one component of the analyte monitoring device when at least one of the temperature levels of the power source reaches a predetermined temperature threshold or when the level of power remaining in the power source reaches a predetermined power threshold.

In certain embodiments, the at least one component may be a display.

In certain embodiments, the display may be an organic light emitting diode (OLED) display.

In certain embodiments, the at least one component may be a test strip interface.

In certain embodiments, the at least one component may be a memory device.

In certain embodiments, the memory device may be a flash memory device.

In certain embodiments, the predetermined temperature threshold may be about zero degrees Celsius.

In certain embodiments, the predetermined temperature threshold may be about negative five degrees Celsius.

In certain embodiments, the predetermined power threshold may be about 3.6V.

In certain embodiments, the predetermined power threshold may be about 3.7V.

In certain embodiments, selectively deactivating the at least one component may comprise determining an amount of power needed by the at least one component and deactivating the at least one component when the determined amount of power exceeds a threshold level.

In other certain aspects of the present disclosure, an apparatus may include one or more processors, and a memory operatively coupled to the one or more processors, the memory for storing instructions which, when executed by the one or more processors, causes the one or more processors to determine a temperature level of a power source of the apparatus, determine a level of power remaining in the power source of the apparatus, and selectively deactivate at least one component of the apparatus when at least one of the temperature level of the power source reaches a predetermined temperature threshold or when the level of power remaining in the power source reaches a predetermined power threshold.

Other certain aspects of the present disclosure may include providing a receiving unit comprising a radio frequency (RF) receiver, receiving a signal relating to an analyte concentration of a patient, determining a time window for receiving a subsequent signal corresponding to additional analyte concentrations of the patient, and selectively deactivating at least one of an antenna of the receiving unit or at least one component of the receiving unit during the determined time window.

In certain embodiments, the antenna may be deactivated using a switch.

Certain embodiments may include determining a transmission range between the receiving unit and the transmitter.

Certain embodiments may include deactivating the antenna when the determined transmission range is within a predetermined transmission range threshold.

In certain embodiments, the transmission range may be based on the strength of the signal.

Various other modifications and alterations in the structure and method of operation of this disclosure will be apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of the embodiments of the present disclosure. Although the present disclosure has been described in connection with particular embodiments, it should be understood that the present disclosure as claimed should not be unduly limited to such particular embodiments. It is intended that the following claims define the scope of the present disclosure and that structures and methods within the scope of these claims and their equivalents be covered thereby.

Claims

1. A method comprising:

determining, by a processor of an analyte monitoring device, at least one of a temperature level of a power source, a level of power remaining in the power source, or an amount of power needed by at least one component of the analyte monitoring device;
determining, by the processor, whether to cause the analyte monitoring device to enter a power saving mode in which an operation of the at least one component of the analyte monitoring device is suspended based on: at least one of the temperature level of the power source, the level of power remaining in the power source, or the amount of power needed by the at least one component and whether one or more executable actions are in process;
determining, by the processor, whether the one or more executable actions are in process based on one or more blocker flags, wherein each respective blocker flag of the one or more blocker flags is indicative of whether a respective executable action of the one or more executable actions is in process; and
causing, by the processor, the analyte monitoring device to enter the power saving mode based on: at least one of the temperature level of the power source, the level of power of the power source, or the amount of power needed by the at least one component, and when the one or more executable actions are determined not to be in process based on the one or more blocker flags.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one component is a display.

3. The method of claim 2, wherein the display is an organic light emitting diode (OLED) display.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one component is a receiver.

5. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one component is a data storage device.

6. The method of claim 5, wherein the data storage device is a memory device.

7. The method of claim 1, wherein causing, by the processor, the analyte monitoring device to enter the power saving mode based on the temperature level of the power source comprises:

causing, by the processor, the analyte monitoring device to enter the power saving mode based on the temperature level being approximately zero degrees Celsius or approximately negative five degrees Celsius.

8. The method of claim 1, wherein causing, by the processor, the analyte monitoring device to enter the power saving mode based on the level of power in the power source comprises:

causing, by the processor, the analyte monitoring device to enter the power saving mode based on the level of power being approximately 3.6V.

9. The method of claim 1, further comprising maintaining, by the processor, a set of components to keep data of the analyte monitoring device updated and current while the analyte monitoring is in the power saving mode.

10. The method of claim 9, wherein the maintained set of components include at least one of data corresponding to sensor life, operations for calibration, and timing of receipt of data packets.

Patent History
Publication number: 20220283042
Type: Application
Filed: Oct 19, 2021
Publication Date: Sep 8, 2022
Applicant: Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. (Alameda, CA)
Inventors: Saeed Nekoomaram (San Mateo, CA), Martin J. Fennell (Concord, CA), Mark Kent Sloan (Redwood City, CA), Lei He (Moraga, CA), Jeffery Mario Sicurello (Union City, CA)
Application Number: 17/504,986
Classifications
International Classification: G01K 13/00 (20060101); A61B 5/00 (20060101); A61B 5/145 (20060101); G01K 1/02 (20060101);