System and device for welding training

- Illinois Tool Works Inc.

A system and device for welding training. In one example, a welding training system includes a display configured to show welding features related to a training welding operation. The system also includes a training workpiece having a substantially transparent weld joint configured to be placed adjacent to the display during the training welding operation. The system includes a processing device coupled to the display and configured to provide welding data relating to the training welding operation to the display. The system also includes a training torch comprising an optical sensor. The training torch is coupled to the processing device and configured to provide the processing device with data from the optical sensor corresponding to a position of the training torch relative to the training workpiece.

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Description

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a Non-Provisional Patent Application of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/521,843 entitled “Tracking Gun for Training,” filed Aug. 10, 2011, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

The invention relates generally to welding and, more particularly, to a system and device for welding training.

Welding is a process that has increasingly become utilized in various industries and applications. Such processes may be automated in certain contexts, although a large number of applications continue to exist for manual welding operations. In both cases, such welding operations rely on a variety of types of equipment to ensure the supply of welding consumables (e.g., wire feed, shielding gas, etc.) is provided to the weld in appropriate amounts at the desired time.

In preparation for performing manual welding operations, welding operators may be trained using a welding training system. The welding training system may be designed to train welding operators with the proper techniques for performing various welding operations. Certain welding training systems may use virtual reality, augmented reality, or other training methods. As may be appreciated, these training systems may be expensive to acquire and operate. Accordingly, welding training institutions may only acquire a limited number of such training systems. Therefore, welding operators being trained by the welding training institutions may have a limited amount of time for hands-on training using the training systems.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

In one embodiment, a welding training system includes a display configured to show welding features related to a training welding operation. The system also includes a training workpiece having a substantially transparent weld joint configured to be placed adjacent to the display during the training welding operation. The system includes a processing device coupled to the display and configured to provide welding data relating to the training welding operation to the display. The system also includes a training torch comprising an optical sensor. The training torch is coupled to the processing device and configured to provide the processing device with data from the optical sensor corresponding to a position of the training torch relative to the training workpiece.

In another embodiment, a welding training system includes a training workpiece having a substantially transparent weld joint configured to be placed adjacent to a display during a training welding operation such that a portion of the display is visible by looking through the substantially transparent weld joint. The system also includes a training torch having a sensor configured to detect data corresponding to a position of the training torch relative to the training workpiece during the training welding operation.

In another embodiment, a welding training system includes a processing device coupled to a display and configured to provide welding data relating to a training welding operation to the display. The system also includes a training torch having an optical sensor. The training torch is coupled to the processing device and configured to provide the processing device with data from the optical sensor corresponding to a position of the training torch relative to a training workpiece.

DRAWINGS

These and other features, aspects, and advantages of the present invention will become better understood when the following detailed description is read with reference to the accompanying drawings in which like characters represent like parts throughout the drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a welding training system in accordance with aspects of the present disclosure;

FIG. 2 is block diagram of another embodiment of a welding training system in accordance with aspects of the present disclosure;

FIG. 3 is a side view of an embodiment of a training torch in accordance with aspects of the present disclosure; and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a training workpiece in accordance with aspects of the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a welding training system 10. The welding training system 10 includes a training torch 12 that may be used for training a welding operator in various welding techniques. The welding training system 10 also includes a training workpiece 14 having a substantially transparent weld joint 16. The weld joint 16 may simulate a weld joint formed during a welding operation (e.g., fillet, lap, butt, groove, etc.). The training torch 12 includes an optical sensor 18 (e.g., camera) that may be used to detect image data (e.g., from the training workpiece 14). In certain embodiments, the detected image data may correspond to a location of the training torch 12 relative to the training workpiece 14. For example, a welding operator may direct the training torch 12 toward the weld joint 16 of the training workpiece 14. The optical sensor 18 of the training torch 12 may then detect image data from the weld joint 16 that may be used to determine a position of the training torch 12 relative to the training workpiece 14.

A first wired interface 20 electrically couples the training torch 12 to a processing device 22 having one or more processor(s) 23. After the training torch 12 detects image data, the training torch 12 provides the image data (e.g., data corresponding to the training workpiece 14, data corresponding to a position of the training torch 12 relative to the training workpiece 14) to the processing device 22 for processing. The processing device 22 may use the image data to determine a position of the training torch 12 relative to the training workpiece 14. A second wired interface 24 electrically couples the processing device 22 to a display 26. Accordingly, the processing device 22 may provide welding data to the display 26 for showing images of welding features that correspond to a welding training operation being performed by a welding operator. For example, the display 26 may show a virtual weld bead 28 corresponding to the welding training operation.

As illustrated, the virtual weld bead 28 may be shown on the display 26 behind the weld joint 16 of the training workpiece 14. As may be appreciated, the processing device 22 may use the determined position of the training torch 12 relative to the training workpiece 14, and a corresponding position of the training workpiece 14 relative to the display 26 to determine where to show the virtual weld bead 28. In certain embodiments, the processing device 22 may be configured to account for a refresh rate of the display 26 and/or lighting conditions (e.g., glare) while processing image data detected by the training torch 12. The display 26 may show other parameters relating to the training welding operation in addition to the virtual weld bead 28. For example, the display 26 may show a travel speed 30 and/or a torch angle 32 (e.g., travel angle, work angle, torch orientation, etc.). As illustrated, the training workpiece 14 is placed adjacent to the display 26 (e.g., touching the display, within ⅛ inch of the display, etc.) during a training welding operation.

A stand 34 may be configured for and used to support the training workpiece 14. As may be appreciated, in certain embodiments, the stand 34 may also be used to calibrate the location of the training workpiece 14 relative to the display 26 (e.g., by the stand 34 and the display 26 being placed in a predetermined location in relation to each other). In other embodiments, the location of the training workpiece 14 relative to the display 26 may be manually calibrated (e.g., before a training welding operation is performed). For example, the welding operator may be instructed to touch an end of the training torch 12 to one or more predetermined locations on the training workpiece 14, which may allow the processing device 22 to determine a location of the training workpiece 14 relative to the display 26. During such a calibration, the display 26 may show a configuration pattern to enable the optical sensor 18 of the training torch 12 to detect image data corresponding to a position on the display 26. Using the training torch 12 with the optical sensor 18, the welding training system 10 enables a welding operator to be trained with a minimal amount of specialized training devices. Accordingly, by using the welding training system 10 a welding operator may receive welding training at a lower cost than possible with other welding training systems.

FIG. 2 is block diagram of another embodiment of the welding training system 10. In this embodiment, the training torch 12, the processing device 22, and the display 26 communicate via wireless interfaces 36, 38, and 40. As may be appreciated, in certain embodiments, the welding training system 10 may communicate via a combination of wired and wireless interfaces. Furthermore, in some embodiments, the training torch 12 may provide data to the processing device 22 using a universal serial bus (USB) interface. As illustrated, a virtual workpiece 42 may be used in place of the training workpiece 14. Accordingly, the optical sensor 18 of the training torch 12 may detect image data directly from the display 26. In certain embodiments, the image data may correspond to a location of the training torch 12 relative to the virtual workpiece 42 and/or the display 26. Using the virtual workpiece 42, a welding operator may perform virtual welds on the display 26 by placing the optical sensor 18 of the training torch 12 near the virtual workpiece 42. In certain embodiments, the display 26 may be configured for three-dimensional viewing. In such an embodiment, the welding operator may wear three-dimensional glasses while performing welding training operations. It should be noted that the wireless interfaces 36, 38, and 40 and/or the virtual workpiece 42 may enable welding training to be performed with less interference from cables and other training devices.

FIG. 3 is a side view of an embodiment of a training torch 12 configured to be used in the welding training system 10 of FIG. 1. As previously discussed, the training torch 12 is configured to detect image data using the optical sensor 18. In the present embodiment, the training torch 12 includes a handle 44, a neck 46, and a nozzle 48. Furthermore, the handle 44 includes a trigger 50 for initiating a training welding operation. As illustrated, the handle 44 is coupled to the nozzle 48 via the neck 46. The optical sensor 18 may extend out of a tip 52 of the nozzle 48. Moreover, the optical sensor 18 may include one or more lenses 54 (e.g., adjustable lenses) to change the focal point of the optical sensor 18 (e.g., to obtain clear and focused image data). In certain embodiments, the optical sensor 18 may be configured to alter the focus of the one or more lenses 54 based on a distance between the optical sensor 18 and the training workpiece 14, and/or a distance between the optical sensor 18 and the virtual workpiece 42. Furthermore, the one or more lenses 54 may include a multi-surface lens (e.g., diamond shaped).

The training torch 12 also includes an optical emitter 56 configured to produce emissions. In certain embodiments, the emissions from the optical emitter 56 may reflect off of the training workpiece 14 and/or the virtual workpiece 42. As may be appreciated, the reflected emissions may be detected by the optical sensor 18 of the training torch 12. Moreover, in the illustrated embodiment, the training torch 12 includes a magnetic sensor 58, while in other embodiments, the training torch 12 may not include the magnetic sensor 58. The magnetic sensor 58 may be used in a welding training system 10 having corresponding magnetic devices to be detected by the magnetic sensor 58 (e.g., for determining the position of the training torch 12. For example, in certain embodiments, the training workpiece 14 may produce a magnetic field and the magnetic sensor 58 may be configured to detect the magnetic field of the training workpiece 14. Furthermore, the training torch 12 may include an orientation sensor 60 (e.g., gyroscope) to detect orientation data of the training torch 12 and to provide the orientation data to the processing device 22. It should be noted that in certain embodiments, the training torch 12 may include an electromagnetic sensor, a radio frequency (RF) sensor, and/or any other suitable sensor to aid in determining a position and/or an orientation of the training torch 12 relative to a workpiece (e.g., the training workpiece 14, the virtual workpiece 42).

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an embodiment of the training workpiece 14 that may be used with the training system 10. The training workpiece 14 includes the substantially transparent weld joint 16, as illustrated. Furthermore, the training workpiece 14 includes a vertical portion 62 and a horizontal portion 64. Moreover, the weld joint 16 is positioned at the intersection of the vertical potion 62 and the horizontal portion 64. In the present embodiment, the weld joint 16 includes a pattern 66 (e.g., shapes, dots, curves, numbers, letters, etc.) configured to be detected by the optical sensor 18 of the training torch 12. For example, the substantially transparent weld joint 16 may include a pattern 66 such that the optical sensor 18 may determine what portion of the training workpiece 14 is being detected based on the detected image data of the pattern 66. The pattern 66 may be imbedded within the weld joint 16 and/or may provide external texture to the weld joint 16.

As may be appreciated, using the systems, devices, and techniques described herein, a low cost welding training system 10 may be provided for training welding operators. The welding training system 10 may allow a greater number of welding operators to be trained and may provide the welding operators with a greater amount of time to use the welding training system 10 (e.g., due to its low cost). Furthermore, as described above, welding operators may receive feedback (e.g., torch angle, travel speed, etc.) while operating the welding training system 10 to improve welding techniques.

While only certain features of the invention have been illustrated and described herein, many modifications and changes will occur to those skilled in the art. It is, therefore, to be understood that the appended claims are intended to cover all such modifications and changes as fall within the true spirit of the invention.

Claims

1. A welding training system comprising:

a display configured to show welding features related to a training welding operation;
a training workpiece comprising a substantially transparent weld joint configured to be placed adjacent to the display during the training welding operation such that a portion of the display is visible by looking through the substantially transparent weld joint;
a processing device coupled to the display and configured to provide welding data relating to the training welding operation to the display; and
a training torch comprising an optical sensor, wherein the training torch is coupled to the processing device and configured to provide the processing device with data from the optical sensor corresponding to a position of the training torch relative to the training workpiece.

2. The system of claim 1, wherein the display is configured to show a virtual weld bead of the training welding operation behind the substantially transparent weld joint of the training workpiece.

3. The system of claim 1, wherein the display is configured to show a travel speed and/or a torch angle of the training welding operation.

4. The system of claim 1, comprising a stand configured to support the training workpiece.

5. The system of claim 1, wherein the substantially transparent weld joint comprises a pattern configured to be detected by the optical sensor.

6. The system of claim 1, wherein the optical sensor comprises a camera configured to receive image data corresponding to the training workpiece.

7. The system of claim 6, wherein the camera comprises an adjustable lens to change a focal point of the camera.

8. The system of claim 6, wherein the camera is configured to alter a camera focus based on a distance between the camera and the training workpiece.

9. The system of claim 1, wherein the optical sensor is configured to detect image data shown on the display.

10. The system of claim 1, wherein the training torch comprises an optical emitter, and wherein the optical sensor of the training torch is configured to detect emissions from the optical emitter after the emissions reflect off of the training workpiece.

11. A welding training system comprising:

a training workpiece comprising a substantially transparent weld joint configured to be placed adjacent to a display during a training welding operation such that a portion of the display is visible by looking through the substantially transparent weld joint; and
a training torch comprising a sensor configured to detect data corresponding to a position of the training torch relative to the training workpiece during the training welding operation.

12. The system of claim 11, wherein the sensor comprises a magnetic sensor configured to detect a magnetic field of the training workpiece.

13. The system of claim 11, wherein the sensor comprises a gyroscope configured to detect an orientation of the training torch.

14. The system of claim 13, wherein the display is configured to show the orientation of the training torch during the training welding operation.

15. The system of claim 11, wherein the display is configured to show a virtual weld bead formed during the training welding operation behind the substantially transparent weld joint of the training workpiece.

16. A welding training system comprising:

a processing device coupled to a display and configured to provide welding data relating to a training welding operation to the display, wherein the display is configured to show a virtual workpiece; and
a training torch comprising an optical sensor, wherein the training torch is coupled to the processing device and configured to provide the processing device with data from the optical sensor corresponding to a position of the training torch relative to a training workpiece, wherein the training workpiece comprises the virtual workpiece.

17. The system of claim 16, wherein the training torch comprises an optical emitter, and wherein the optical sensor of the training torch is configured to detect emissions from the optical emitter after the emissions reflect off of the training workpiece.

18. The system of claim 16, wherein the training torch is configured to detect a weld joint on the virtual workpiece present on the display.

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Patent History

Patent number: 8986013
Type: Grant
Filed: Jul 31, 2012
Date of Patent: Mar 24, 2015
Patent Publication Number: 20130040270
Assignee: Illinois Tool Works Inc. (Glenview, IL)
Inventor: Bruce Patrick Albrecht (Neenah, WI)
Primary Examiner: Robert J Utama
Application Number: 13/562,982

Classifications

Current U.S. Class: Soldering Or Welding (434/234); Light Sensor Included In Simulator Of Radio Navigation Equipment (434/240); Occupation (434/219); Methods (219/121.64)
International Classification: G09B 25/02 (20060101); B23K 9/00 (20060101); B23K 9/095 (20060101); G09B 19/00 (20060101); G09B 19/24 (20060101);