CONNECTED FITNESS SYSTEMS AND METHODS

A platform-based strength machine enables users to perform strength or lifting activities or exercises via moveable or configurable pull points. The strength machine can include tracks that facilitate the configuring of the positions of the pull points, handles that control operation of the strength machine and/or measure movements performed by a user, compact motors that facilitate various platform or load application configurations, safety systems for the strength machine, and other enhancements.

Skip to: Description  ·  Claims  · Patent History  ·  Patent History
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to the following applications: U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/168,862, filed on Mar. 31, 2021, entitled STRENGTH TRAINING SYSTEMS AND METHODS; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/262,000, filed on Oct. 1, 2021, entitled STRENGTH TRAINING SYSTEMS AND METHODS; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/295,365, filed on Dec. 30, 2021, entitled EXERCISE SYSTEMS AND METHODS; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/295,386, filed on Dec. 30, 2021, entitled EXERCISE PLATFORM SYSTEMS AND METHODS; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/295,404, filed on Dec. 30, 2021, entitled EXERCISE SYSTEMS AND METHODS; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/295,392, filed on Dec. 30, 2021, entitled EXERCISE HANDLE SYSTEMS AND METHODS; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/295,444, filed on Dec. 30, 2021, entitled EXERCISE HANDLE SYSTEMS AND METHODS; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/295,205, filed on Dec. 30, 202, entitled MOTOR AND DRIVETRAIN MECHANISM SYSTEMS AND METHODS, U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/295,215, filed on Dec. 30, 2021, entitled SAFETY MECHANISMS SYSTEMS AND METHODS. All applications listed herein are incorporated by reference in their entirety.

BACKGROUND

The world of connected fitness is an ever-expanding one. This world can include a user taking part in an activity (e.g., running, cycling, lifting weights, and so on), other users also performing the activity, and other users doing other activities. The users may be utilizing a fitness machine (e.g., a treadmill, a stationary bike, a strength machine, a stationary rower, and so on), or may be moving through the world on a bicycle.

The users can also be performing other activities that do not include an associated machine, such as running, strength training, yoga, stretching, hiking, climbing, and so on. These users can be associated with a wearable device or mobile device that monitors the activity and may perform the activity in front of a user interface (e.g., a display or device) presenting content associated with the activity, such as an exercise class or video game.

The user interface, whether a mobile device, a display device, or a display that is part of a machine, can provide or present interactive content to the users. For example, the user interface can present live or recorded classes, video tutorials of activities, video games, leaderboards and other competitive or interactive features, progress indicators (e.g., via time, distance, and other metrics), and so on.

Thus, a connected fitness platform can provide users with different access points into the content and activities provided by the platform. These access points can include cardio machines, strength machines, wearable devices, mobile devices, and/or other devices or machines that facilitate and/or enhance user activities with or within the connected fitness platform.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Embodiments of the present technology will be described and explained through the use of the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1A is a diagram illustrating a user performing an activity with an example strength machine.

FIG. 1B is a diagram illustrating various devices of the example strength machine.

FIGS. 2A-2C are block diagrams illustrating components of a strength machine.

FIG. 2D is a block diagram illustrating communication components of a strength machine.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating a suitable network environment for connected fitness systems.

FIGS. 4A-4C are diagrams illustrating a platform for a strength machine.

FIG. 4D is a block diagram illustrating an electrical system for a platform-based strength machine.

FIG. 4E is a block diagram illustrating components of a control system for a platform-based strength machine.

FIGS. 5A-5E is a block diagram illustrating various track configurations of a platform for a strength machine.

FIGS. 6A-6B are diagrams illustrating a display integrated into a platform for a strength machine.

FIG. 7 is a diagram illustrating layers of a platform for a strength machine.

FIGS. 8A-8K are diagrams illustrating a track mechanism and associated carriage for a track within a platform of a strength machine.

FIGS. 9A-9K are diagrams illustrating various aspects of the track mechanism.

FIG. 10 is a diagram illustrating an attachment for a platform-based strength machine.

FIGS. 11A-11G are diagrams illustrating various components of attachments for a platform-based strength machine.

FIGS. 12A-12C are diagrams illustrating coupling devices that couple handles to cables of a platform-based strength machine.

FIG. 13 is a block diagram illustrating components of an interactive handle for use with a platform-based strength machine.

FIGS. 14A-14E are diagrams illustrating a motor of a platform-based strength machine.

FIGS. 15A-15B are diagrams illustrating a motor lock mechanism for a platform-based strength machine.

FIGS. 16A-16J are diagrams illustrating various cooling components of a platform for a strength machine.

FIGS. 17A-17B are diagrams illustrating various electrical components of a platform for a strength machine.

FIGS. 18A-18F are diagrams illustrating various motor configurations of a platform for a strength machine.

FIG. 19A-19D are diagrams illustrating a strength machine having a platform and a bench.

FIG. 19E is a diagram illustrating a bench placed on a platform for a strength machine.

FIG. 19F is a diagram illustrating various layers of a bench pad for a platform-based strength machine.

FIGS. 20A-20B are diagrams illustrating a handle detection system for a platform-based strength machine.

FIG. 21 is a diagram illustrating a stability system for a platform-based strength machine.

FIG. 22 is a flow diagram illustrating a method for adjusting operations of a platform.

FIG. 23 is a flow diagram illustrating a method of determining a handle is paired to a motor.

FIG. 24 is a flow diagram illustrating a method of controlling operations of a strength machine.

FIG. 25 is a flow diagram illustrating a method of performing movement tracking for a user.

FIG. 26 is a flow diagram illustrating a method of performing movement tracking for a user.

FIG. 27 is a flow diagram illustrating a method for presenting class information to a user of an exercise class.

FIG. 28 is a diagram illustrating an example user interface presenting a leaderboard.

In the drawings, some components are not drawn to scale, and some components and/or operations can be separated into different blocks or combined into a single block for discussion of some of the implementations of the present technology. Moreover, while the technology is amenable to various modifications and alternative forms, specific implementations have been shown by way of example in the drawings and are described in detail below. The intention, however, is not to limit the technology to the particular implementations described. On the contrary, the technology is intended to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the scope of the technology as defined by the appended claims.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Overview

Various systems, methods, apparatuses, and devices that enhance an exercise activity performed by a user are described. In some embodiments, a strength machine enables users to perform strength or lifting activities or exercises. The strength machine includes a digital weight system or other motor-based resistance mechanism, a platform upon which a user stands or is otherwise positioned and attachments (e.g., handles and/or bars) to be engaged (e.g., pulled or pushed) by the user when performing the strength activities or exercises.

In some embodiments, the strength machine includes a cable adjustment mechanism or track mechanism that enables a user to utilize different pull points when engaging the handles. The platform of the strength machine can include multiple track mechanisms, and facilitates the user to adjust, modify, and/or tailor the configuration of the platform (e.g., adjust cable pull points) before performing various strength movements. In some cases, the track mechanism includes locking features or components, which lock the pull points and/or monitor intended positioning of the pull points to provide safe, reliable, intended operations of the strength machine, among other benefits.

In some embodiments, the platform of the strength machine is configured and/or designed to provide a surface or contact area that enables a user to perform strength movements and other exercises comfortably and safely. In some cases, the platform can include certain layers that provide different functionalities (e.g., comfort or contact, information display, support, stability, and so on).

In some embodiments, the strength machine includes attachments, such as handles, bars, or other user engagement or interface devices, which facilitate the strength movements and provide a user with control of the platform and associated content during activities. In some cases, the attachments can include user controls, sensors, coupling mechanisms, and/or other features that enable a user to control the operation of the strength machine or its platform, control an associated class or other content, and so on. Further, various connected fitness systems, such as repetition counting systems, form tracking systems, safety systems, motor control systems, and so on, can utilize information captured or measured by the handles during activities, among other benefits.

In some embodiments, the strength machine includes a motor or other resistance mechanism (or multiple motors or resistance mechanisms) that applies a load for a user when performing strength activities. The motor, in some cases, can include an integrated spool that wraps or otherwise maintains a cable or rope that is coupled to the attachments via which the user engages with the platform. Further, the motor can include various locking mechanisms, which prevent rotation of the motor during unintended uses, among other benefits. Thus, various motors described herein can include a motor mechanism, a spool mechanism, and/or a locking mechanism.

In some embodiments, the strength machine includes the platform and an associated bench. The bench can have a geometry or structure that facilitates placing the bench on the platform during certain strength movements (e.g., bench press) and/or components that can store or contain attachments and/or accessories of the strength machine.

In some embodiments, the strength machine includes or is associated with various safety or operation systems, which utilize data captured from the strength machine and perform actions to mitigate unsafe or unintended conditions. For example, the strength machine can employ a handle detection system that controls operation of the strength machine based on an identification of the handles coupled to the machine, a platform stability system that controls operation of the strength machine based on a measured or tracked orientation of the platform, and so on.

Further, in some embodiments, the strength machine can present or be associated with different types of content or services/applications that enhance the activities performed by the user. For example, the user can perform activities with the strength machine during a class (streamed live or pre-recorded) and can view or control various aspects of the class (such as via the attachments).

Further, the content can present or track various types of information, such as leaderboard or ranking information that reflects the user's effort or earned metrics (e.g., weight, repetitions, movements) with respect to other users, tracking information that indicates the activities performed by the user, form information that captures how a user performs certain activities, and so on. In some cases, these services or applications can utilize information provided by the strength machine (e.g., data captured by platform sensors and/or attachments) with data captured by computer vision devices, image sensors, or other devices associated with the strength machine that view or monitor a user performing activities using the strength machine.

Various embodiments of the system and methods will now be described. The following description provides specific details for a thorough understanding and an enabling description of these embodiments. One skilled in the art will understand, however, that these embodiments may be practiced without many of these details. Additionally, some well-known structures or functions may not be shown or described in detail, so as to avoid unnecessarily obscuring the relevant description of the various embodiments. The terminology used in the description presented below is intended to be interpreted in its broadest reasonable manner, even though it is being used in conjunction with a detailed description of certain specific embodiments.

Examples of a Strength Machine

A strength machine that facilitates the performance of various lifting or weight-based exercise activities is described. FIG. 1A illustrates a user 105 performing an activity with an example strength machine 100. The user 105 stands or is otherwise positioned on a platform 110 of the strength machine 100.

The platform 110 can provide a load or resistance for strength or resistance training, such as via a controllable or variable load motor or motors. The platform 110 includes one or more cables 125 (e.g., a first cable and/or a second cable that extends from the platform 110) and one or more resistance mechanisms (disposed within the platform 110) configured to apply a variable or controllable resistance, such as one or more motors.

The resistance mechanisms are configured and/or controlled to apply a load to an attachment (e.g., a handle or handles) coupled to the motors via the cable or cables 125. For example, the motor provides resistance to the attachment 120 while or when the user pulls or pushes the attachment 120 away from the platform 110 (such as by performing a lifting movement). Thus, the motor or motors of the platform 110 provide a controllable and/or variable load to the attachments 120 while the user performs various strength training activities (e.g., bicep curl, overhead press, and so on). The platform 110, therefore, acts as a configurable set of weights, such as a digital weights system.

FIG. 1B is a diagram illustrating various devices or components of an example strength machine 130. The strength machine 130, which can be part of an exercise system, includes various devices or components that provide or facilitate exercise activities for a user, such as the user 105. For example, the strength machine 130 can provide resistance training for the user 105, such as for strength training or other weighted exercises. The strength machine 130 can provide dynamic or variable resistance, which can alter the load between lifts/exercises/movements and/or allow the user 105 to increase or decrease the load applied to handles during the activities.

In some cases, the strength machine 130 can automatically, or in response to input received from the user 105, change the load, such as in response to sensor information, associated class or content instruction, suggested weight actions, and so on. Thus, the strength machine 130 is a strength-training or weight-training device (e.g., in the form of a “smart” platform) that can be used with a bench, without a bench, with various attachments (e.g., individual handles or a single bar), and/or configured as various combinations that facilitate desired strength training exercises or movements.

The strength machine 130, in some embodiments, includes the platform 110, a bench 135, and/or the one or more attachments 120. The platform includes a cable adjustment mechanism 140 and a slider or carriage 150, which moves along the cable adjustment mechanism 140 (or multiple mechanisms 140) to position cables that extend out of the platform 110 at various locations of the platform 110. Thus, the strength machine 130 can include some or all the components and can be provided as a complete set of components, as modules of a system, or other versions of the machine 130.

The attachments 120 can provide an interface that facilitates user engagement of the strength machine 130. The attachments 120 can include various hand holds, bars, or grips, among other attachments. For example, the attachments 120 can include a flex handle, a rigid handle, a bar, or other interface devices. The platform 110, via the resistance mechanism, can apply a load to the attachments 120 to provide resistance during strength training or other workout activities. For example, the user 105 can push, pull, or otherwise move handles against a load generated by the platform 110 during an exercise activity.

A flex handle can include a single hand, single pull point attachment configuration. For example, the flex handle can include a grip (e.g., freely rotating) and a rope connecting opposing ends of the grip to an attachment mechanism, such as a coupling that couples or connects the handle to a cable. The rope can be slidably coupled to accommodate wrist pronation, deviation, or other movements or deviations during exercise activities.

A rigid handle, or a kettlebell handle, can include a two-handed, single pull point attachment configuration having a shape similar to a hand hold of a kettlebell. For example, the rigid handle includes two primary grip zones and a secondary overhand grip zone configured in a triangle configuration. A rope may connect an intersection of primary grip zones to an attachment mechanism, such as a coupling to a cable of a platform. The rigid handle can provide various grip configurations, including a kettlebell grip utilizing secondary overhand grip zones and a V-grip utilizing primary grip zones.

A bar can include a two-handed, double pull point attachment configuration. For example, the bar can include a rope at each end to connect the bar to attachment mechanisms, such as couplings that couple the bar to cables. In some cases, the bar can be an anodized extruded aluminum bar having knurling located on grip surfaces and knurl markers to help users center their grip on the bar, under the bar, and/or maintain an even, balanced, grip of the bar.

As described herein, the attachments 120 can control or provide a mechanism for controlling the strength machine 130. For example, the attachments 120 can include one or more buttons, sliders, toggles, or switches, among other mechanisms (e.g., user controls), to operate the strength machine 130, such as to turn strength machine 130 on or off (e.g., a weight on/off button), change the amount of weight provided by the strength machine 130 (e.g., weight+/−buttons), change a mode of the strength machine 130, and so on.

In some embodiments, the attachments 120 can control one or more accessories or other devices, such as a media system, a sound system, a video system, an application, a streaming content system, a smart device, and so on. The user controls, in some cases, can be repositionable (e.g., slidable) along the attachments 120 to accommodate different grip locations during exercise. For example, the bar can include a slidable (e.g., but non-removable) puck or slider that can be positioned at various locations along the bar when the user 105 changes grips during use of the bar.

The strength machine 130 can include other features or components. For example, the strength machine 130 can include or connect to a power adapter and one or more charging cables, such as a first charging cable for the platform 110 and a second charging cable for the attachments 120. The platform 110 and/or attachments 120 can be plugged into a power source (wall outlet, USB outlet, battery, and so on) for operation and/or recharging an internal power source (e.g., an internal battery). For example, the attachments 120 can be USB-C rechargeable via the second charging cable and can provide a status of charge state, such as via an internal or external LED, which can shine through the housing of the attachments 120 without having an exposed light pipe, allowing the LED to not show when in an off state. Thus, the strength machine 130 can operate when plugged in and/or using charged batteries (e.g., optionally preventing operation when plugged in and recharging batteries).

The platform 110 can also include a display 160, which can show various states of operation, such as whether the platform 110 is in a locked state, a state of operation, a weight applied to the attachments 120, a charge state, and so on.

FIG. 2A depicts an example strength machine 200. The strength machine 200 can include a platform 210, which contains a digital weight system that includes a control system 220 or controller and a motor 224, such as a motor that causes a load to be applied to an attachment 230 (e.g., handle or bar) via a cable 235 or other connection/coupling between the attachment 230 and the motor 224. Various enhancements to the strength machine 200 (or strength machines 110, 130) are described herein.

The motor 224 can be part of a resistance mechanism or system, which can include the motor, a drivetrain, a spool, and so on. In some cases, the motor 224 includes the drivetrain, or is part of the drivetrain. For example, the motor 224 and a spool can be considered a drivetrain that functions to apply a load to the attachment 230 during operation of the machine 200. In some cases, the platform can include electromechanical based resistance mechanism, a magnetic based mechanism, or other mechanisms that apply a load or force to the attachment 230.

FIG. 2B depicts the strength machine 200 with two motors 224A and 224B. As depicted, each of the motors 224A and 224B are paired with separate attachments 230A and 230B. For example, the controller 220 can control the motor 224A to apply a force or load to the attachment 230A via a cable 235A and can control the motor 224B to apply a force (e.g., an equal or balance force) to the attachment 230A via the cable 235B.

FIG. 2C depicts the strength machine 200 with a single attachment 230C (e.g., a bar) coupled to the motors 224A and 224B via the cables 235A and 235B. The motors 224A and 224B, via the controller 220, can apply equal or similar forces to each end of the attachment 230C, such that a user moving the attachment 230C feels or experiences a balanced force across the attachment 230C.

The strength machine 200 can employ various communication protocols when transmitting data or information between related components and devices. FIG. 2D is a block diagram 250 illustrating communication components of a strength machine, such as the strength machine 110, 130, or 200. The platform 210 can directly communicate with the attachments 230 via Bluetooth® (e.g., Bluetooth Low Energy, or BLE) or other short-range communications protocols or wired connections. The platform 210 can also utilize wireless protocols when communicating with various external or remote systems 260, such as a media system, class-based streaming system, and so on. In some cases, the attachment 230 can also utilize wireless communications to exchange data with the remote systems 260, the platform 210, or other devices associated with the strength machine 200.

Examples of a Suitable Connected Fitness Environment

The technology described herein is directed, in some embodiments, to providing a user with an enhanced user experience when performing an exercise activity, such as an exercise activity as part of a connected fitness environment or other exercise system. FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating a suitable network environment 300 for users of an exercise system.

The network environment 300 includes an activity environment 302, where a user 305 is performing an exercise activity, such as a strength activity. In some cases, the user 305 can perform the activity with an exercise machine 310, such as the various strength machines described herein. The exercise activity performed by the user 305 can include a variety of different workouts, activities, actions, and/or movements, such as movements associated with stretching, doing yoga, lifting weights, rowing, running, cycling, jumping, sports movements (e.g., throwing a ball, pitching a ball, hitting, swinging a racket, swinging a golf club, kicking a ball, hitting a puck), and so on.

The exercise machine 310 can assist or facilitate the user 305 to perform the movements and/or can present interactive content to the user 305 when the user 305 performs the activity. For example, while the exercise machine 310 is often described herein as being a strength machine, in some cases, the environment 300 includes other machines, such as stationary bicycles, stationary rowers, treadmills, or other machines. As another example, the exercise machine 310 can be or include a display device that presents content (e.g., classes, dynamically changing video, audio, video games, instructional content, and so on) to the user 305 during an activity or workout.

The exercise machine 310 can include or be associated with a media hub 320 and/or a user interface 325. The media hub 320, in some cases, captures images and/or video of the user 305, such as images of the user 305 performing different movements, or poses, during an activity. Further, the media hub can capture audio (e.g., voice commands) from the user 305. The media hub 320 can include a camera or cameras, a camera sensor or other optical sensors configured to capture the images or video of the user 305 and/or a microphone or other audio capture devices.

In some cases, the media hub 320 includes components configured to present or display information to the user 305. For example, the media hub 320 can be part of a set-top box or other similar device that outputs signals to a display, such as the user interface 325. Thus, the media hub 320 can operate to both capture images or voice commands of/from the user 305 during an activity, while also presenting content (e.g., streamed classes, workout statistics, and so on) to the user 305 during the activity. Further details regarding a suitable media hub can be found in commonly assigned and co-pending U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 63/179,071 filed on Apr. 23, 2021, entitled USER EXPERIENCE PLATFORM FOR CONNECTED FITNESS SYSTEMS, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.

The user interface 325 provides the user 305 with an interactive experience during the activity. For example, the user interface 325 can present user-selectable options that identify live classes available to the user 305, pre-recorded classes available to the user 305, historical activity information for the user 305, progress information for the user 305, instructional or tutorial information for the user 305, and other content (e.g., video, audio, images, text, and so on), that is associated with the user 305 and/or activities performed (or to be performed) by the user 305.

The exercise machine 310, the media hub 320, and/or the user interface 325 can send or receive information over a network 330, such as a wireless network. Thus, in some cases, the user interface 325 is a display device (e.g., attached to the exercise machine 310), that receives content from (and sends information, such as user selections) an exercise content system 335 over the network 330. In other cases, the media hub 320 controls the communication of content to/from the exercise content system 335 over the network 330 and presents the content to the user via the user interface 325.

Further, some or all components of the exercise machine 310 can communicate directly with the media hub 320 and/or the user interface 325, such as via wired connections, wireless connections, (Bluetooth® (e.g., BLE) or other short-range communications protocols, and so on.

The exercise content system 335, located at one or more servers remote from the user 305, can include various content libraries (e.g., classes, movements, tutorials, and so on) and perform functions to stream or otherwise send content to the machine 310, the media hub 320, and/or the user interface 325 over the network 330.

In addition to a machine-mounted display, the display device 325, in some embodiments, can be a mobile device associated with the user 305. Thus, when the user 305 is performing activities outside of the activity environment 302 (such as running, climbing, and so on), a mobile device (e.g., smart phone, smart watch, or other wearable device), can present content to the user 305 and/or otherwise provide the interactive experience during the activities. Further, the display device 325 can be part of a different exercise machine 310 (e.g., a bike with display) within the activity environment 302.

In some embodiments, the connected fitness environment 300 includes a classification system 340. The classification system 340 communicates with the media hub 320 to receive images and perform various methods for classifying or detecting poses, movements, and/or exercises performed by the user 305 during an activity. The classification system 340 can be remote from the media hub 320 (as shown in FIG. 3) or can be part of the media hub 320.

The classification system 340 can include a pose detection system 342 that detects, identifies, and/or classifies poses performed by the user 305 and depicted in one or more images captured by the media hub 320. Further, the classification system 340 can include an exercise detection system 345 that detects, identifies, and/or classifies exercises or movements performed by the user 305 and depicted in the one or more images captured by the media hub 320. The system 340, as described herein, can also utilize information from one or more sensors of the strength machine 100 when detecting and/or classifying poses, movements, or exercises performed by the user 305.

Various systems, applications, and/or user services 350 provided to the user 305 can utilize or implement the output of the classification system 340, such as pose and/or exercise classification information. For example, a follow along system 352 can utilize the classification information to determine whether the user 305 is “following along” or otherwise performing an activity being presented to the user 305 (e.g., via the user interface 125), such as during an exercise class viewed by the user 305.

As another example, a lock on system 354 can utilize the person detection information and the classification information to determine which user, in a group of users, to follow or track during an activity. The lock on system 354 can identify certain gestures performed by the user and classified by the classification system 340 when determining or selecting the user to track or monitor during the activity.

Further, a smart framing system 356, which tracks the movement of the user 305 and maintains the user in a certain frame over time, can utilize the person detection information when tracking and/or framing the user. Of course, other systems 358 can also utilize pose or exercise classification information when tracking users and/or analyzing user movements or activities. Further details regarding the classification system 340 and various systems (e.g., the follow along system 352, the lock on system 354, the smart framing system 356, and so on) are also described in the applications incorporated by reference herein.

In some embodiments, the systems and methods include and/or access a movements database (dB) 360. The movements database 360, which can reside on a content management system (CMS) or other system associated with the systems of the environment 300 (e.g., the exercise content system 335), includes various data structures that store information as entries that relate individual movements to data associated with the individual movements. As described herein, a movement is a unit of a workout or activity, and in some cases, the smallest unit of the workout or activity. Example movements include a bicep curl, chest press, squat, bench press, pushup, and so on.

The movements database 360 can include, or be associated with, a movement library 365. The movement library 365 includes short videos (e.g., GIFs) and long videos (e.g., ˜90 seconds or longer) of movements, exercises, activities, and so on. Thus, in one example, the movements database 360 can relate or link a movement to a video or GIF within the movement library 365.

Various systems and applications can utilize information stored by the movements database 360. For example, a class generation system 370 can utilize information from the movements database 360 when generating, selecting, and/or recommending classes for the user 305, such as classes that target specific muscle groups.

As another example, a body focus system 375 can utilize information stored by the movements database 360 when presenting information to the user 305 that identifies how a certain class or activity strengthens or works the muscles of their body. The body focus system 375 can present interactive content that highlights certain muscle groups, displays changes to muscle groups over time, tracks the progress of the user 305, and so on.

Further, a dynamic class system 380 can utilize information stored by the movements database 360 when dynamically generating a class or classes for the user 305. For example, the dynamic class system 380 can access information for the user 305 from the body focus system 375 and determine one or more muscles to target in a new class for the user 305. The system 380 can access the movements database 360 using movements associated with the targeted muscles and dynamically generate a new class for the user that incorporates videos and other content identified by the database 360 as being associated with the movements.

Of course, other systems or user services can utilize information stored in the movements database 360 when generating, selecting, or otherwise providing content to the user 305. Further details regarding the movements database 360 and various systems (e.g., the class generation system 370, the body focus system 375, the dynamic class system 380, and so on) are also described in the applications incorporated by reference herein.

As described herein, the exercise content system 335, in some embodiments, streams or provides a live or archived class to the user 305 of the exercise machine 310, who performs activities during the class (e.g., in sync with an instructor of the class). The user interface 325 can present various information or content during the class or activities. For example, the user interface 325 can present dynamically adjusting metrics, such as information tracking the movement of the machine (e.g., adjusted applied weight, length of cables, acceleration of the handles, range of motion), information depicted the form or movement of the user 305 (e.g., the user in sync with the instructor, an avatar or other animation, and so on).

Further, the user interface 325 can display weight suggestions and/or recommendations. For example, the various systems described herein can utilize algorithms that determine a weight or load for the user 305 (e.g., for a given movement or activity) based on a variety of factors. These factors can be based on an initial calibration, where the user performs a variety of movements during initial use of the machine 310 and the systems measure the applied weight, the range of motion, and so on. The user interface 335 can then present these recommendations to the user 305 during a class or during other activities, such as in response to an instructor moving to a new activity or movement within a class.

FIG. 3 and the components, systems, servers, and devices depicted herein provide a general computing environment and network within which the technology described herein can be implemented. Further, the systems, methods, and techniques introduced here can be implemented as special-purpose hardware (for example, circuitry), as programmable circuitry appropriately programmed with software and/or firmware, or as a combination of special-purpose and programmable circuitry. Hence, implementations can include a machine-readable medium having stored thereon instructions which can be used to program a computer (or other electronic devices) to perform a process. The machine-readable medium can include, but is not limited to, floppy diskettes, optical discs, compact disc read-only memories (CD-ROMs), magneto-optical disks, ROMs, random access memories (RAMs), erasable programmable read-only memories (EPROMs), electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs), magnetic or optical cards, flash memory, or other types of media/machine-readable medium suitable for storing electronic instructions.

The network or cloud 330 can be any network, such as a wired or wireless local area network (LAN), a wired or wireless wide area network (WAN), the Internet or some other public or private network, a cellular (e.g., 4G, LTE, or 5G network), and so on. While the connections between the various devices and the network 330 and are shown as separate connections, these connections can be any kind of local, wide area, wired, or wireless network (public or private), such as Ultra-wideband UWB), ISM radios, ultrasonic communications, infrared (IR), and so on.

Further, any or all components/modules depicted in the Figures described herein can be supported and/or implemented via one or more computing systems or servers. Although not required, aspects of the various components or systems are described in the context of computer-executable instructions, such as routines executed by a computer or computing device, e.g., a mobile device, a server computer, a tablet of an exercise machine, or personal computer. The system can be practiced with other communications, data processing, or computer system configurations, including: Internet appliances, hand-held devices, wearable devices, or mobile devices (e.g., smart phones, tablets, laptops, smart watches), all manner of cellular or mobile phones, multi-processor systems, microprocessor-based or programmable consumer electronics, set-top boxes, network PCs, mini-computers, mainframe computers, AR/VR devices, gaming devices, and the like. Indeed, the terms “computer,” “host,” and “host computer,” and “mobile device” and “handset” are generally used interchangeably herein and refer to any of the above devices and systems, as well as any data processor.

Aspects of the system can be embodied in a special purpose computing device or data processor that is specifically programmed, configured, or constructed to perform one or more of the computer-executable instructions explained in detail herein. Aspects of the system may also be practiced in distributed computing environments where tasks or modules are performed by remote processing devices, which are linked through a communications network, such as a Local Area Network (LAN), Wide Area Network (WAN), or the Internet. In a distributed computing environment, program modules may be located in both local and remote memory storage devices.

Aspects of the system may be stored or distributed on computer-readable media (e.g., physical and/or tangible non-transitory computer-readable storage media), including magnetically or optically readable computer discs, hard-wired or preprogrammed chips (e.g., EEPROM semiconductor chips), nanotechnology memory, or other data storage media. Indeed, computer implemented instructions, data structures, screen displays, and other data under aspects of the system may be distributed over the Internet or over other networks (including wireless networks), or they may be provided on any analog or digital network (packet switched, circuit switched, or other scheme). Portions of the system may reside on a server computer, while corresponding portions may reside on a client computer such as an exercise machine, display device, or mobile or portable device, and thus, while certain hardware computing platforms are described herein, aspects of the system are equally applicable to nodes on a network. In some cases, the mobile device or portable device may represent the server portion, while the server may represent the client portion.

Examples of a Platform for a Strength Machine

As described herein, in some embodiments, the technology includes a strength machine (or weight machine). The strength machine, in some embodiments, is a platform-based machine, which includes a platform, one or more handles or other attachments, and a digital weight system that provides or applies weight during various strength or lifting activities performed by a user of the strength machine.

As described herein, the strength machine includes various cable adjustment mechanisms, or track mechanisms, that facilitate the placement of cable pull points at different locations on a top surface of a platform. In some cases, the cable adjustment mechanisms can define discrete pull points, while in other cases, the pull points can be at any position within the cable adjustment mechanism. FIG. 4A depicts a platform 400 having various cable adjustment mechanisms.

The platform 400 includes a top surface 410 having one or more cable adjustment mechanisms, such as a first cable adjustment mechanism 412 and a second cable adjustment mechanism 414 accessible via the top surface 410, and one or more cable guides adapted to be adjustably positioned or moved within the cable adjustment mechanisms 412, 414. The cable adjustment mechanisms 412, 414, as described herein, can include tracks or slots that facilitate movement of the cable guides 415 to different positions within the top surface 410 of the platform 400.

For example, the platform 400 can include a first cable guide 415 or slider adapted to be adjustably positioned in the first track 412 to position or fix a first cable to the platform 400. Similarly, the platform 400 can include a second cable guide 417 or slider adapted to be adjustably positioned in the second track 414 to position or fix a second cable to the platform 400.

A first cable passes through the first cable guide 415 and a second cable passes through the second cable guide 417. The cable guides, or sliders, can include cable attachment mechanisms 420, 422 that can be configured to rest, mate, or otherwise abut against the cable guides 415, 417, respectively, such as to limit or stop further retraction of the cables into the platform 400.

In some embodiments, the cable guides or sliders can be adjusted or moved along their respective cable adjustment mechanisms to configure the platform 400 to a particular exercise and/or user. For example, the first cable guide 415 and second cable guide 417 can be positioned to accommodate a narrow position where the first cable guide 415 and the second cable guide 417 are placed close together within the cable adjustment mechanism 412 and the second cable adjustment mechanism 414, respectively, and a wide position where the first cable guide 415 and the second cable guide 417 are positioned away from each other in the first cable adjustment mechanism 412 and the second cable adjustment mechanism 417, respectively.

Also, the first cable guide 415 and the second cable guide 417 can be adjusted to wide positions to reconfigure the platform 400 to be used by a large-framed user and/or to be utilized by a user when performing an exercise having a wider set-up (e.g., pull points away from the user). For example, wide pull points can provide a vertical connection to a single bar, allowing plenty of space between the cables. Similarly, the cable guides can be moved to narrow positions (e.g., positioned near each other) to modify the platform 400 to accommodate a small-framed user and/or to be utilized by a user performing an exercise requiring a narrower set-up (e.g., pull points closer to the user). For example, narrow pull points can provide a shoulder-width distance and allow movements to replicate movements with dumbbells.

Thus, the platform 400, having cable adjustment mechanisms, or track mechanisms, that facilitate various configurations of cable pull points, enables a user, such as the user 105, to perform multiple varied exercise movements. For example, the platform 400 can accommodate the performance of various centered pull point exercises (e.g., goblet squats, curls, triceps extensions, and so on), outboard pull points exercises (e.g., squats, deadlifts, bench press, and so on), or other movements or exercises.

In some embodiments, the cable adjustment mechanisms 412, 414 can include stop locations or markers, which define or identify stop locations for the cable guides 415, 417 along the cable adjustment mechanisms 412, 414. The stop locations can facilitate the locking of the cable guide or slider to the cable adjustment mechanism (e.g., to an inner track or tracks), such that the slider is removably fixed to the cable adjustment mechanism during a movement or exercise. The cable adjustment mechanisms 412, 414 can include visual indicators of the stop locations to provide to the user the location and/or position of a given location or pull point.

To facilitate movement along the cable adjustment mechanisms, the cable guides 415, 417 can include features that adjustably position the cable guides at different stop locations. For example, each cable guide can include a button (e.g., button 424 or button 426), which releases the cable guide to slidably move on or along a cable adjustment mechanism when the button is depressed and locks the cable guide at a stop location when the button is released. In some cases, a cable guide is configured to lock only at certain positions (e.g., the stop locations).

The cable guides can include a track lock, such as an electromagnetic locking mechanism, which enables the cable guide to be slidably adjusted or otherwise movable along the cable adjustment mechanisms when the platform 400 is not in use (e.g., there is no load applied to a handle via a cable passing through the cable guide). Similarly, the track lock can limit or prevent movement of a cable guide when the platform 400 is in use (e.g., there is a load applied to a handle via a cable passing through the cable guide).

Thus, the track lock can limit or prevent movement of the cable guide when a user is performing exercises and/or limit movement of a cable passing through the cable guide when the user is sliding the cable guide to a stop location, among other benefits. Further, as described herein, the cable adjustment mechanism can sense when the cable guide is in a correct or intended position and communicate to the system the measured position. Further, the locking mechanism, the cable adjustment mechanism, or other components can include visual indicators that indicate to a user than the cable guide is locked in a correct or intended position on or along the cable adjustment mechanism.

FIG. 4B depicts additional components of the platform 400. As described herein, a display 430 can be disposed or mounted to a top side of a plate 440, where the plate includes the cable adjustment mechanisms 412, 414 and facilitates the sliding movement of the cable guides 415, 417 along the cable adjustment mechanisms 412, 414. The plate 440 can include various communication components 450, such as various antennas mounted to the top side of plate 440. The communication components 450 can include or be implemented as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth® (e.g., BLE), cellular, radio, and/or other types of communication interfaces for wireless communications. In some cases, the communication components 450 can be placed at the corners of the plate 440 or at other locations away from where a user stands or impacts the platform 400.

FIG. 4C depicts a bottom view 460 of the platform 400. The platform 400 includes the plate 440, which provides structure to the platform 400. The plate 440 can be formed of an extruded material and acts as the main mounting structure for the platform 400. In some cases, all the internal components of the platform 400 are mounted directly to the plate 440. For example, resistance mechanisms, a track mechanism 465, and feet 470 are mounted to a bottom side of the plate 440.

Further, the plate 440 contain or include one or more fans and/or various electrical components (e.g., sensors, control systems, batteries, braking resistors, and so on). The resistance mechanisms can include an electric motor 475 mounted to the plate 440, and an encoder 474 (or encoders) coupled to the motor or motors 475. As described herein, the motor 475 operates to provide or apply a load to a cable 472 that passes through a cable guide, where the cable extends from the motor 475 and against the load.

The plate 440 can include or be part of other features of the platform 400. For example, the plate 440 can include one or more channels that define an airflow path through the plate 440 to various components (e.g., motor 475) connected to the plate 440 to cool or dissipate heat away from the components out of the plate 440.

Thus, the platform 400 provides a variable, controllable load to a user when the user is performing strength activities or movements. As described herein, the platform 400, as depicted in FIG. 4D, includes the control system 220 (e.g., implemented as a controller or control device) and the motor 224 (e.g., the motor 475) or motors.

The platform 400 can also include various sensors, such as IMUs (inertial measurement units) 480 disposed at different locations within the platform 400. The IMUs can capture or measure information when the platform 400 is in use, such as by incorporating accelerometers, gyroscopes, magnetometers, and other sensors. Thus, the IMUs can detect the platform 400 is moving, either in one direction, two directions, or in three-dimensional space.

Further, the platform 400 can include load cells 485 or other sensors that measure and/or determine a load applied to the platform 400 and/or to different areas or sections of the platform 400. For example, the platform 400 can include one or more load cells 485 (one on each side, as depicted), three load cells 485 (in a triangular configuration), four load cells (e.g., placed in each corner or centered at each edge of the platform 400), and so on.

The control system 220 can receive information from the IMUs 480 and/or load cells 485 and control operations for the platform 400, such as by shutting down or removing the load applied to the handles by the motor 224 when the IMUs determine the platform 400 is moving in a certain direction, such as upwards. Further details regarding the use of IMU data and/or load cells data and operation of the platform 400 are described herein.

As described herein, the control system 220 can include various components that control or facilitate the operation of the platform 400. FIG. 4E depicts various components of a control system for a platform-based strength machine. The control system 220 can facilitate various operations of the platform 400, including managing communications and data exchanges (e.g., data exchanges with attachments 230), controlling various components and tests, receiving and processing sensor data, among other operations.

The control system 220 includes a power supply 482, a controller 484, an input/output (I/O) component 486, display 488, communications components 490, platform logic 492, one or more motor drivers 494, and/or one or more sensors 496. The power supply 482 can be any power supply suitable to power the platform 400 and/or the strength machines described herein. For example, the power supply 482 can include one or more rechargeable batteries or other power supply components. In some cases, the platform 400 utilizes a wall outlet to charge the batteries (or other components), such as when the platform 400 is not being utilized during exercise activities.

The controller 484 can be implemented as one or more microprocessors, microcontrollers, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), programmable logic devices (PLDs) (e.g., field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), complex programmable logic devices (CPLDs), field programmable systems on a chip (FPSCs), or other types of programmable devices), or other processing devices used to control operations of the platform 400.

The I/O component 486 can process user actions (e.g., user selection of one or more buttons or controls), such as by sending a corresponding signal to the controller 484. The I/O component 486 can also include an output component, such as a display control. The I/O component 486 can include an optional audio/visual component to allow a user to use voice for inputting information by converting audio signals and/or input or record images/videos by capturing visual data. The I/O component 486 can allow the user to hear audio and view images/video.

The communications components 488, as described herein, can include wired and/or wireless interfaces. The wired interfaces can include communications links with various platform components and can be implemented as one or more physical networks or device connect interfaces (e.g., Ethernet and/or other protocols). The wireless interfaces can be implemented as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth® (e.g., BLE), cellular, infrared, radio, and/or other types of network interfaces for wireless communications and can facilitate communications with various wireless devices of the connected fitness platform.

Platform logic 492 can be implemented as circuitry and/or a machine-readable medium storing various machine-readable instructions and data. For example, in some embodiments, the platform logic 492 can store an operating system and one or more applications as machine-readable instructions that may be read and executed by the controller 484 to perform various operations described herein. In some embodiments, the platform logic 492 can be implemented as non-volatile memory (e.g., flash memory, hard drive, solid state drive, or other non-transitory machine-readable mediums), volatile memory, and so on. The platform logic 492 can include status, configuration and/or control features, which may include various control features disclosed herein. In some embodiments, the platform logic 492 executes one or more tests or calibrations to be performed on or by the platform 400 or associated strength machine (where the status information of the tests, calibration specific values, and other information can be displayed to the user).

One or more motor drivers 494 can control one or more of the motors of the platform 400, such as the motors 475 of the resistance mechanism 460. Further, one or more sensors 496 can include various sensors, such as load cells or force transducers, IMUs, sensors for detecting calibration values, sensors for detecting or capturing motor position (e.g., encoders, motor feedback sensors, and so on), sensors for capturing exercise apparatus position, sensors for measuring a platform position, and so on.

In some embodiments, the control system 220 can adjust an applied load in response to feedback from IMUs, load cells, and/or other sensor information. For example, in response to a detection of improper and/or unsafe use of the platform 400, the control system 220 can perform various mitigation actions, such as action to ramp down the load, eliminate or turn off the load, lock further movement of the cables, shut down the platform 400, and so on. Thus, the control system 220 is configured to selectively control the resistance applied to each cable by an associated resistance mechanism.

In some embodiments, the control system 220 detects and/or tracks a movement and/or a position of each cable. The system 220 can utilize and/or provide the tracked movement information for repetition counting or for use in determining other metrics (e.g., user strength compared to applied load, exercise failure, body tracking, intensity, tempo, volume, power, and so on). In some cases, the control system 220 can detect and track the movement and/or a position of the attachments 120 or 230 attached to the cables. The control system 220 can identify and mitigate use of mismatched handles, detached handles, insufficiently charged handles, nonproprietary handles, and so on. The control system 220, therefore, can notify a user of a platform and/or handle state, such as a battery state, power loss, system health, error codes, connection status, and so on.

In some embodiments, the control system 220 can provide a weight control or balancing feature based on data received from the IMUs 280, load cells, and/or other sensors of the platform 110, 210, or 400 and/or the attachments 120 or 230. For example, the control system 220 can automatically adjust loads based on a desired function and/or detected movement of the attachments 230 and/or coupled cables.

The control system 220 can automatically decrease loads when failure is detected and/or when a spotter is desired. Conversely, the control system 220 can automatically increase loads based on a detected ease of exercise performance by the user (e.g., an auto-load feature or strength detection). In some cases, the control system 220 can increase, decrease, or otherwise tailor the load(s) to a user, an exercise, and/or to a functionality, in various weight increments (+/−1 pound or kilogram, +/−5 pounds, and so on). For example, the control system 220 can tailor or control an applied load to mimic a burnout (e.g., a burnout mode), lifting with chains (e.g., a chains mode), eccentric-focused movements (e.g., an eccentric mode), concentric-focused movements (e.g., a concentric mode), and/or other exercise modes.

As described herein, the platform 400 includes one or more cable adjustment mechanisms 412, 414 that enable a user to set cable pull points at different locations on the top surface 410 of the platform 400. The platform 400 can include cable adjustment mechanisms having a variety of configurations, shapes, and/or geometries. FIGS. 5A-5E depict various configurations of a platform for a strength machine.

First, FIG. 5A depicts a platform 500 having two cable adjustment mechanisms 505 and associated sliders 507 or cable guides. The two cable adjustment mechanisms 505 are placed or disposed close to a front edge 502 of the platform 500, such that a user can stand closer to a back edge 504 of the platform 500 when performing strength activities.

FIG. 5B depicts a platform 510 having a single cable adjustment mechanism 515 that spans much of the length of the platform 500. The single cable adjustment mechanism 515 enables a user to move associated sliders 517 or cable guides to various positions along the cable adjustment mechanism 515, such as near a left edge 514 and/or a right edge 512 of the platform 500. For example, the user can place both sliders 517 near the right edge 512 and/or the left edge 514, or place one slider 517 at each edge.

FIG. 5C depicts a platform 520 that includes vertically placed or disposed cable adjustment mechanisms 525 and associated sliders 527. The cable adjustment mechanisms 525 can be placed near a center line of the platform 520 and/or near the edges of the platform, and can accommodate, among other configurations, staggered pull points, where one slider 527 is placed higher than the other slider 527.

FIG. 5D depicts a platform 530 that includes an oval shaped or generally circular cable adjustment mechanism 535 and associated sliders 537. The sliders 537 can be placed at various locations near or proximate to the edges of the platform 530. FIG. 5E depicts a platform 540 that includes rectangular track 545 and associated sliders 547. The cable adjustment mechanism 545 can include different segments (e.g., multiple vertical and horizontal segments), enabling a user to move the sliders 547 to different areas of the platform 540, such as near a center of the platform 540 and/or towards one or more edges of the platform 540.

Of course, a platform for a strength machine can include various other shapes or configurations of cable adjustment mechanisms, in addition to the examples depicted herein. A platform can include one, two, or several cable adjustment mechanisms, as well as one or more sliders for each cable adjustment mechanism. A platform can include single cable adjustment mechanisms having different shapes, such as X-shapes, Z-shapes, and so on.

Further, while the platforms depicted here are generally placed on the ground or a floor during use (where the user stands on the platform), in some embodiments the platforms are configured to be mounted to a wall or vertical structure. For example, platforms 400, 500, 510, 520, 530, and/or 540 (or others depicted herein) can be placed in a vertical or angled orientation, and the user can move associated sliders along the cable adjustment mechanisms of the platforms to select various vertically positioned or located pull points that accommodate different exercises or activities, among other things.

FIGS. 6A-6B are diagrams illustrating a display integrated into a platform 600 for a strength machine. The platform 600 includes a display 610, which can present information to a user, such as warnings, status updates, applied or set weights or loads, and so on. For example, the display 610 can present a “15,” indicating that a weight of 15 lbs. has been set for each handle held by a user.

The display 610 can be implemented as an LED display, a liquid crystal display (LCD), an organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, and/or any other appropriate display component. In some cases, the display 610 can notify the user whether a cable guide is locked into a stop position. In some cases, a top surface of the platform 600 may define or provide a workout surface through which the display 610 is visible. For example, a workout surface can include a polyurethane laminate over an open woven textile (e.g., a Kevlar woven textile), which transmits light through the surface or layer. These materials can also act to prevent sweat or other liquids from seeping into the platform 600.

FIG. 6B presents an exploded view of the display 610. The display 610 can include a PCB assembly 620 having an LED array 622 and a cable 624 for connection to a control system. A reflector 630, which can be formed of polycarbonate, is coupled to the PCB assembly 620, and a diffuser 640, which can be formed of frosted polycarbonate, is coupled to the reflector 630 to control light characteristics provided by the LED array 622. A display cover 650 protects the PCT assembly 620, reflector 630, and diffuser 640, and provides a mechanism to connect the display 610 to the platform 600. In some cases, the display 610 can include a mylar mask 660 that is attached to the display cover 650. Of course, the display 610 can utilize other layers or materials.

As described herein, the display 610 can be part of, or integrated into, a workout surface of the platform 600. FIG. 7 is a diagram illustrating layers of a platform 700 for a strength machine. The platform can include a workout surface 710, formed of a woven textile and protective layer, which includes or contains the display 610. The workout surface 710 is disposed on top of a plate 720, such as the plate 440 or other mounting structure. The platform 700 can also include a base 730 or other structure that supports the plate 720 and/or workout surface 710 and includes elements 735 (e.g., adjustable feet or pads) that contact a surface upon which the platform 700 is placed during workouts. In some cases, the elements 735 incorporate weight sensors, such as load cells.

As described herein, the platform-based strength machine includes tracks and associated carriages, cable guides, or sliders, which move along the tracks and define pull points for cables when locked or otherwise fixed at different locations on or within the tracks. FIGS. 8A-8F illustrate a track mechanism for a track within a platform for a strength machine.

FIG. 8A presents a perspective side view of a track mechanism 800 and a carriage 805 or slider coupled to the track mechanism 800, and FIG. 8B depicts an end view of the track mechanism 800 and the carriage 805. The track mechanism 800 is secured at least partially within a platform and associated with at least one cable guide to adjustably position the cable guide at different locations, as described herein.

The track mechanism 800 can be formed of one or more extruded components or formed steel rails that define or provide a path along which the carriage 805 slides, rolls, or otherwise moves or travels. For example, as shown in FIG. 8B, the track mechanism 800 includes a first track 810 and a second track 812 that each allow the carriage 805 to traverse the track mechanism 800. The carriage 805 includes a roller that engages an extruded track of the track mechanism 800 to slide or move the carriage 805 along or through the track mechanism 800.

For example, the carriage 805 includes a first roller 816 configured to roll along and/or in the first track 810 and a second roller 818 configured to roll along and/or in the second track 812. The first roller 816 and the second roller 818 move the carriage 805 along the length of the track mechanism 800 to adjustably position the cable guides at different locations of a platform.

The first track 810 can include a first lower track section 822 and a first upper track section 824 that limit movement of the carriage 805 (e.g., the first roller 816) along a first axis (e.g., a vertical axis). For example, the first lower track section 822 and/or the first upper track section 824 have a flat shape. The first roller 816 can be a flat roller positioned at least partially between the first lower track section 822 and the first upper track section 824.

The second track 812 can include a second lower track section 830 and a second upper track section 832 that limit movement of the carriage 805 (e.g., the second roller 818) along the first axis 826 and a second axis (e.g., a lateral axis). For example, the second lower track section 830 and/or the second upper track section 832 can have a non-flat shape that partially surrounds the second roller 818. The second roller 818 can be a round or rounded roller positioned at least partially between the second lower track section 830 and the second upper track section 832, such as within grooves defined by the shape of the second lower track section 830 and the second upper track section 832. The grooves, in some cases, limit the movement of the carriage 805 within directions other than along the length of track mechanism 800, such as directions that are perpendicular or intersect with the length of the track mechanism 800.

FIGS. 8C-8E depict various views of the carriage 805. The carriage 805 includes a carriage body 840 and a cable guide 842 (e.g., like the cable guides described herein) coupled to the carriage body 840. The first roller 816 or rollers are coupled or rotatably attached to one side of the carriage body 840 and the second roller 818 or rollers are coupled or rotatably attached to an opposite side of the carriage body 840 to support or fix the carriage body 840 within the track mechanism 800 (within one or more cable adjustment mechanisms, as described herein).

The carriage 805 can include an indexing roller 846 (e.g., a pair of indexing rollers 846) and a lock pin 848 coupled to a movable arm 850 of the carriage body 840. As illustrated, the lock pin 848 is aligned with the indexing roller 846 (e.g., coaxially aligned at the end of the arm 850), although other configurations are contemplated. The indexing roller 846 and lock pin 848 can selectively index with respective portions of the track mechanism 800. For example, the indexing roller 846 can selectively index with a first portion of the track mechanism 800 to provide an indexing and track position status, as described herein. The lock pin 848 can selectively index with a second portion of the track mechanism 800 to lock the carriage 805 at a stop location, as described herein.

The carriage 805 can include multiple magnets. For example, the carriage 805 can include a first magnet 860 mounted on a shaft 862 and connected to a button 865 (e.g., a “button magnet”), and a second magnet 866 mounted at the indexing roller 846 (e.g., a “roller magnet”). As described herein, the magnets can interact with one or more sensors to provide indexing information and button status information for the carriage 805. For example, the magnets can be utilized to determine a position of the carriage 805 along the track mechanism 800, as well as a lock status of the carriage 805, among other information. The first magnet 860 and the second magnet 866 can have opposite polarity, to limit false positives during position sensing.

In some cases, the carriage 805 can include other components that facilitate the sensing or detecting of the carriage at different positions of a rail or track. The components can include proximity sensors or other objects sensed by rail or track detectors.

Pressing the button 865 (e.g., actuation of the button 865) can disengage the carriage 805 from the rails of the track mechanism 800. For example, the button 865 can actuate the indexing roller 846 and/or the lock pin 848, where the carriage 805 can then move along the track mechanism 800 when the button 865 is depressed, and where the carriage 805 is prevented from moving or locked into a stop position when the button 865 is released. In some cases, pressing the button 865 moves the arm 850 to disengage the indexing roller 846 and/or the lock pin 848 and enable movement of the carriage 805 along the track mechanism 800. Further, releasing the button 865 causes the arm 850 to move and engage the indexing roller 846 and/or the lock pin 848 of the track mechanism 800 to lock the carriage 805 in a position or location.

FIG. 8E presents an exploded view of the carriage 805. The carriage 805 includes a fairlead 856 and a cable pulley 858. The fairlead 856 receives and guides a cable through the cable guide 842. The cable pulley 858 is positioned to guide the cable from the fairlead 856 to a resistance mechanism, such as a motor or other device that applies a force or load. The button 865 can provide a visual indication when the carriage 805 is positioned between stop positions. For example, the cable guide 842 can include a visual indicator 864 (e.g., a different color) that is visible when the button 865 is depressed. When the carriage 805 is positioned between stop positions, the button 865 may remain depressed such that visible indicator 824 is seen, as described herein. In some cases, the first roller 816, the second roller 818, the indexing roller 846, the lock pin 848, and/or the cable pulley 858 include one or more bearings, spacers, or other features that facilitate reliable, smooth, or quiet operation.

FIGS. 8F-8H present various aspects of the fairlead 856. The fairlead 856, as depicted in FIGS. 8F and 8G, can include a roller design. For example, the fairlead 856 can include a carrier 870 and multiple rollers 872 coupled to the carrier 870. A circlip 874 can retain the carrier 870 and the rollers 872 to the cable guide 842. As depicted in FIG. 8H, the fairlead 856 can include a ball bearing design. For example, the fairlead 856 can include multiple ball bearings 875 in lieu of the rollers 872. Of course, the fairlead 856 can include other designs, including a static fairlead design. However, in some cases, the fairlead 856 is configured to cause or facilitate the cable to extend from a platform at an angle, such as extreme or non-extreme angles.

FIGS. 81-8K depict alternative configurations of the track and carriage. For example, track 880 includes a track section 890 having a raised bead 887 upon which a carriage 885 travels to different positions or locations. The carriage can include multiple rollers 889, which includes grooves 891 to match the bead 887 of the track section 890. The mating or matching of the grooved rollers 889 to the raised track section 890 can locate the carriage 885 in a lateral direction on the track section 890. In other cases, the carriage can include low friction sliders instead of, or in addition to, the rollers 889.

As described herein, the tracks of the various platforms described herein utilize track mechanisms, which facilitate the movement of a carriage or slider, the locking of the carriage or slider, and the sensing of a fixed or locked carriage or slider. FIG. 9A presents an exploded view of the track mechanism 800. In some embodiments, the track mechanism 800 includes a sensor rail 900. The sensor rail 900 includes multiple grooves 904 (e.g., indexing grooves) that represent or define different carriage positions (e.g., the stop positions described herein) along the track mechanism 800. The sensor rail 900 can include other aspects to represent or define positions, such as holes, slots, tabs, and so on.

The track mechanism 800 also includes a sensor 906 positioned or disposed at each groove 904. The sensor(s) 906 can be part of a sensor board 910 connected to the sensor rail 900. The sensor board 910 can include a shape complementary to the sensor rail 900 to allow or facilitate the positioning of the carriage 805 along the sensor rail 900. For example, the sensors 906 can include hall effect sensors placed at the track positions to provide indexing and button status information for both safety and user experience functionality.

FIG. 9B presents a cross-sectional view of the carriage 805 engaged with the sensor rail 900. The indexing roller 846 of the carriage 805 can selectively index with one or more grooves 904. For example, the indexing roller 906 can roll or move along the sensor rail 900 until the indexing roller 846 is located or placed in a groove 904 of the sensor rail 900. In some cases, the indexing roller 846 can be biased to snap, click, or otherwise automatically engage the groove 904. Depressing the button 865 can facilitate removal of the indexing roller 846 from the groove 904, such that the carriage 805 slides along the track mechanism 800 until the indexing roller 846 engages another one of the grooves 904 and moves to a new or different locked position of the carriage 805.

The indexing roller 846 can engage the sensor 906 at each of the grooves 904 to provide an indexing and/or track position status or other position status information. For example, engagement of the indexing roller 846 with the sensor 906 in the groove 904 can allow the system to determine where the carriage 805 is located along the track mechanism 800, when the carriage 805 is locked in position at one or more grooves 904, and/or when the carriage 805 is not locked in a position, such as a stop position.

FIGS. 9C-9E present cross-sectional views of the carriage 805 at different stages of a button being pressed and/or released. In some cases, the button 865 moves between three “stage” positions, which enable the sensing functionality of the sensor rail 900. FIG. 9C depicts the button 865 in a first stage (e.g., “Stage 0”) when the carriage 805 is in position and not being used. When in the first stage, the first magnet 860 and the second magnet 866 align with the sensor 906 (e.g., a hall effect sensor) of the sensor rail 900 (e.g., both magnets are detected or recognized by the sensor board 910). In some cases, the first stage of the button 865 provides or facilitates positional feedback or information for the carriage 805.

FIG. 9D depicts the button 865 in a second stage (e.g., “Stage 1”) when the user presses the button 865. When in the second stage, the alignment, contact, or pairing of the first magnet 860 and an associated sensor 906 is broken (e.g., the first magnet 860 is not seen, detected, or proximate to the sensor board 910). The second stage can indicate a press of the button 865, and cause or generate a signal to unlock the track mechanism 800 (e.g., when safe to do so) and/or can trigger a message or indicator to the user that adjustment is prevented due to an unsafe condition (e.g., via the display 610 or an associated interface). When the track mechanism 800 is unlocked, the user can press the button 865 past the second stage to a third stage or position.

FIG. 9E depicts the button 865 in a third stage (e.g., “Stage 2”) when the button 865 is fully or near fully depressed. When in the third stage, the first magnet 860 and the second magnet 866 are misaligned from or no longer proximate to associated sensors 906 (e.g., neither magnet is recognized by the sensor board 910), and the carriage 805 can be moved between positions on the track mechanism 800. The button 865 can remain in the third stage when moving between positions, moving to the first stage when the carriage 805 is indexed or otherwise located in a lock or stop position.

Thus, as described herein, the control system 220 or another system associated with a platform or a strength machine that includes a platform can utilize sensed or measured information to determine whether the rollers (e.g., the indexing roller 846) are positioned within the grooves 904 of the sensor rail 900. FIG. 9F presents a graph or chart 920 that relates distance along a track (in mm) to flux density (in milli-Tesla).

The system 220 can track flux density (or other measured values) as a function of distance, measured by the sensors 906, and determine whether the indexing roller 846 is placed or disposed within a groove 904 of the sensor rail 900. As depicted in the graph 920, as the indexing roller 846 approaches the groove 904, a sensor signal 922 increases until it reaches a peak flux density 904 (when the indexing roller 846 is seated or positioned within the groove 904). In response to depressing the button 865, the sensor signal 922 drops to a baseline value or decreases as the indexing roller 846 moves away from the groove 904.

Thus, as described herein, the various sensors can: detect a button press and use that information to unlock a track, which allows a user to move a carriage; indicate the position of the carriage or when the carriage is between index positions.

As described herein, the track mechanism 800 can lock the carriage or slider 805 into various positions and/or restrict or lock its movement along the track. FIG. 9G presents an exploded view of the track mechanism 800. The track mechanism 800 includes a lock rail 930. The lock rail 930 can be positioned opposite the sensor rail 900 along the track mechanism 800. The lock rail 930 can be actuated by a solenoid 932 (or other actuator) to move between an unlocked position and a locked position. As described herein, the unlocked position of the lock rail 930 may allow the carriage 805 to be repositioned or otherwise travel along the track mechanism 800. The locked position of the lock bar 930 may limit movement of the carriage 805 along the track mechanism 800. In some cases, the lock bar 930 can be held in position by a lock rail 934. The lock rail 934 may allow the lock bar 930 to move (e.g., slide) between positions. The lock rail 934 can align the lock bar 930 on the track mechanism 800 and guide the lock bar 930 between positions.

FIGS. 9H-91 depict engagement of the carriage 805 and the lock rail 930. The lock bar 930, or track lock, provides a safety feature that limits users from being able to adjust the pull point location of the platform during operation (e.g., when a load is actively applied). The lock bar 930 can include machined or die-cast features that facilitate the lock pin 908 to pass through when the track mechanism 800 is unlocked and block the lock pin 908 from passing through when the track mechanism 800 is locked.

The lock pin 908 can be selectively blocked or unblocked by the lock bar 930, such as via one or more notches 940 defined or located in the lock bar 930. When the lock rail 930 is in the unlocked position, the notches 940 align at the carriage positions (e.g., stop positions) and allow the lock pin 908 to pass through the lock rail 930. The lock bar 930 can include a ramped profile on a leading edge of tabs or areas between the notches 940, which facilitates reception of the lock pin 908.

For example, the movement of the lock bar 930 to the unlocked position (via solenoid 932) can align the notch 940 with the lock pin 908, allowing the lock pin 908 to move through the lock bar 930 when the 865 is pressed or otherwise actuated. The carriage 805 can then be moved along the track mechanism 800, until the lock pin 908 aligns with another notch 940 in the lock bar 930, and the lock pin 908 passes through the lock bar 930 to set the position of the carriage 805 along the track mechanism 800.

When the lock bar 930 is in the locked position (as shown in FIG. 91), the notches 940 can be offset from the carriage positions (e.g., stop positions) to block the lock pin 908 and limit the movement of the carriage 805 along the track mechanism 800. For example, due to the lock rail 930 blocking movement of the lock pin 908 when the lock bar 930 is in the locked position, the indexing roller 846 is locked into a groove 904 to limit movement of the carriage 805 along the track mechanism 800. When the lock bar 930 is in the locked position, the button 865 cannot be actuated, because the lock bar 930 limits actuation of the lock pin 908. Thus, actuation of the button 865 can be limited or prevented, such as when an unsafe condition is detected or when the platform is in operation, among other benefits.

For example, in a first scenario where the platform has applied a load to one or more handles, the user may attempt to adjust the position of the carriage 805 by pressing the button 865. Because of the lock bar 930, the button 865 resists being depressed, and the sensors 906 can notify the control system 220 that the user is attempting to adjust the carriage 805 during an unsafe or operational state of the platform. The system can notify the user that the adjustment is disabled while the weight is turned on or otherwise active (e.g., such as via the display 610 or another associated display or indicator).

As a second example, the user wishes to change the position of the carriage 805 when the platform is not in operation (e.g., there is no applied load). The button 865 can be depressed (e.g., moves inward about 3 mm), which actuates the arm 850. For example, in some cases, the arm 850 starts actuation after the button is depressed a certain distance (e.g., 3 mm), because the button 865 does not contact the arm 850 until it moves a certain minimum distance. Such a configuration enables the indexing function of the track mechanism to be decoupled from the button 865, preventing forces from transmitting through the button 865. The indexing roller 846 on the arm 850 disengages from the groove 904 in the track mechanism 800. When the platform is in an off state, the platform can prevent movement, because the pin cannot be actuated.

The sensors 906 can notify the system that the position of the carriage 805 is being adjusted (e.g., to limit unsafe state changes). When the indexing roller 846 is disengaged from the groove 904, the user can move the carriage 805 as desired until the carriage 805 indexes into position or is otherwise locked into place. The sensors 906 can detect the indexing roller 846 and allow or enable weight to be enabled or otherwise applied (e.g., when other conditions are met).

In some embodiments, the tracks or slots can include ingress or other protection features that limit particles or small objects from moving through the slots and into the platform. FIGS. 9J-9K depict an ingress protection feature for one or more slots or tracks 412, 414 of a platform or platforms, such as the platform 110. A cover 950 can be positioned within the slots 412, 414 to limit ingress of objects into the platform 110. The cover 950 can include a mesh covering 952 or other features that limits or prevents objects from passing into the platform 110, such as material that deflects (and recovers) when the carriage 805 travels along the track.

Examples of Attachments for a Strength Machine

As described herein, in some embodiments, a user interfaces with a strength machine via one or more attachments, such as single handles, bars, and so on. The attachments can include, among other features, machine controls, motion detection sensors (e.g., IMUs), power components, coupling mechanisms, and/or other components that facilitate the control of a strength machine via input received by the attachments and/or the capture of activity information using various handle sensors, among other things.

FIG. 10A depicts a coupling of an attachment 1010, such as a bar, to a platform 1000. The attachment 1010 includes a handle attachment mechanism 1015, which can be removably connected to a cable 1025 of the platform 1000 via a cable attachment mechanism 1020. As described herein, the handle attachment mechanism 1015 may include a rotatable locking component configured to be inserted into and engage with the cable attachment mechanism 1020, and a control (e.g., a button) adapted to retract the locking component to separate the handle attachment mechanism 1015 from the cable attachment mechanism 1020.

The attachments described herein, such as attachment 1010, can provide an interface for a user with the platform, facilitating user engagement with the various strength machines described herein. The attachments 1010 can be a variety of different types, such as hand holds, bars, or grips, among other handles.

For example, the attachments can include a flex handle, a rigid handle, a bar, or another device or handle. As described herein, as a user engages with the handle (e.g., pushes or pulls the handles), the platform 1000, via various resistance mechanisms, resists the movement, providing resistance or strength training for the user (e.g., during cardio, weight training, or other workouts). For example, the user 105 can push, pull, or otherwise handles during one or more instructed or self-directed movements, against a load provided by the platform 1000 during the movements. Thus, the attachment 1010 can include a gripping or rotating element adapted for grasping or holding by the user.

In some embodiments, the attachment 1010 can control or include a mechanism for controlling a strength machine, such as components of the platform 1000. For example, the attachment 1010 can include one or more buttons, sliders, toggles, or switches, among other mechanisms (e.g., user controls), to operate the platform 1000, such as to turn the platform 1000 on or off (e.g., a weight on/off button), change the amount of weight provided by the platform 1000 (e.g., weight+/−buttons), change a mode of the platform 1000.

The user controls can be part of the gripping element to adjust a load applied by the platform 1000 via input received by the attachment 1010. In some cases, the attachment 1010 can include controls that are configured to control one or more accessories or other devices, such as a media system, a sound system, a video system, an audio system, an application, a smart device, or other systems or services described herein.

In some cases, the user controls can be repositionable (e.g., slidable) along the handles to accommodate different grip locations during a movement or exercise. For example, the bar can include a slidable control (e.g., a slidable puck, as described herein) that includes control buttons or other actuators or components. The puck can slide or move along the bar via a groove or slot (or via other coupling configurations) so a user can position the puck proximate to their hands when they grip the bar during movements or exercises. The different types of attachments and their components will now be described.

FIGS. 11A-11B depict an example flex handle. The flex handle can include or provide a single hand, single pull point attachment configuration. The gripping element includes a rotatable grip 1110. A cable or rope 1112 connects opposing ends of the grip 1110 to the cable attachment mechanism 1020. The grip 1110 can include the user controls, such as a weight on/off button 1118 and a weight+/−toggle button 1120 (or other buttons or rotary controls). In some cases, a software feature of the weight+/−toggle button 1120 may double as additional weight off buttons when under an applied load. Both the weight on/off button 1118 and weight+/−button 1120 may be defined on an end cap 1114 allowing full use (e.g., rotation) of the grip 1110.

Thus, the user controls can be located on an end of the grip 1110. The grip 1110 can include a USB port 1112 or other charging port to recharge an internal battery of the grip 1110, such as via a charging cable, and an indicator light 1115, which can display illumination to indicate a status of the flex handle. The rope 1112 can be slidably coupled to the cable attachment mechanism 1020 to accommodate wrist pronation, supination, or other deviations during exercise.

Internally, the flex handle includes a main chassis providing a foundation or structure for the grip and the user controls. For example, the grip 1110 is rotatable about the main chassis to allow full use of the grip 1110 during various movements. The user controls and/or other electronics may be connected to the main chassis. For example, a battery, a main circuit board, a daughter circuit board, and a laser direct structuring (LDS) antenna (or other antenna) can be positioned at least partially within the main chassis. The battery can be rechargeable (e.g., via USB port 1112) and configured to power the electronics of the flex handle. The daughter circuit board can plug into and extend the circuitry of the main circuit board and can be fixed in position via a daughter board bracket. The LDS antenna can plug into the daughter circuit board.

The weight on/off button and weight+/−toggle button may be associated with a left end cap. The LDS antenna, the daughter circuit board, and/or the daughter board bracket can be associated with an opposing right end cap. A light pipe can also be associated with right end cap. The light pipe, such as indicator 1115, can provide a visual notification to a user, such as a notification that represents a charge state, a battery status, a pairing status, or other notifications or indicators.

In some cases, the flex handle can include features facilitating connection of the various internal elements of the handle. For example, the flex handle can include a cable fixing cap and a pair of cable fixing brackets to secure and guide the rope 1112. At least one end cap can be secured to the main chassis via an end cap bracket. The end cap bracket can also support one or more electronics, such as the main circuit board. A rubber sheet can be positioned between the grip 1110 and the main chassis to protect internal circuitry and/or facilitate rotation of the grip about the main chassis.

FIGS. 11C-11D depict an example rigid handle. The rigid handle can include or provide a two-handed, single pull point attachment configuration. A gripping element includes a rigid triangular handle defining two primary grip zones or sections 1150 and a secondary overhand grip zone or section 1152. A cable or rope 1156 connects (e.g., intersect with) the primary grip zones 1150 to the cable attachment mechanism 1020.

The rigid handle can include or provide various grip configurations, including a kettlebell grip utilizing the secondary overhand grip zone 1152, a V-grip utilizing the primary grip zones 1150, and/or an inverted V-grip. The rigid handle can include user controls, such as weight+/−buttons 1160 and a first weight on/off button 1162 along or disposed at the secondary overhand grip zone 1152 and a second weight on/off button 1164 along or disposed at the primary grip zones 1150. A software feature of the weight+/−buttons 1160 may double as additional weight on/off buttons when under an applied load.

As shown, the rigid handle can include a rubberized internal grip 1166 and a USB port 1168 to recharge an internal battery of the rigid handle, such as via a charging cable. Similar to the other handles, the rigid handle can include an indicator light 1169, which presents illumination to indicate a current operational status of the handle.

In some cases, the rigid handle can include an internal structure that provides a desired rigidity and strength for the rigid handle. For example, the rigid handle can include a lower skeleton and an upper skeleton. A main handle can be secured within the lower skeleton and the upper skeleton, such that the lower skeleton and the upper skeleton surround the main handle for structural support. A lower handle can be secured around the lower skeleton to conceal the lower skeleton between the main handle and the lower handle. A keypad can be secured to a top of the main handle to conceal the upper skeleton between the main handle and the keypad. The rope 1156 can be secured to the lower skeleton to provide a pull point attachment for the rigid handle.

The user controls can be secured to the lower skeleton and/or the upper skeleton. For example, a pair of button circuit boards can be connected to the upper skeleton to support the weight+/−button 1160 and the weight on/off button 1162. A main circuit board, a USB-C or other circuit board, and a rechargeable battery can be secured to the lower skeleton. In some cases, a light pipe can provide a visual notification to a user, such as a notification via the indicator 1169 that represents a charge state, a battery status, a pairing status, or other notifications or indicators.

FIGS. 11E-11G depict an example bar. The bar can include or provide a two-handed, double pull point attachment configuration. The bar includes a slot or groove 1180 running along a length of the bar, and a puck 1182 that slides or moves along or within the groove 1180 for positioning along the length of the bar to accommodate different grip locations during an exercise activity. The puck 1182 can be a non-removable control puck that slides along or partially within a hollow core of the bar.

The puck 1182 includes user controls, such as weight+/−buttons 1183, 1185 and a weight on/off button 1184, which enables the user to turn applied weight loads on/off and to adjust the applied loads during or between sets. In embodiments, the bar and/or the user controls can include a sensor having a “tilt to turn off load” feature, which enables the user to turn the load off entirely simply by tilting the bar to a certain angle.

A cable or rope can connect each end of the bar at an end cap 1186. The end caps 1186 can rotate to a allow full range of motion during an exercise activity, such that the bar can rotate with respect to the end caps 1186. Further, the end caps 1186 can have a larger diameter than the bar, which can protect the ends of the bar, the puck 1182, and/or the bar itself, when dropped or when the bar contacts the floor. In some cases, the bar is formed of anodized extruded aluminum, and includes knurling located on grip surfaces and/or knurl markers to assist users to center their grip on the bar, under the bar, or to grip the bar at equal distances from the end caps 1186.

Internally, the bar can include a bar end secured to an end of the bar, such as via a pin and screws. The end cap 1186 can be secured to the bar end, such as via a shoulder screw. A bushing can be positioned between the end cap 1186 and the bar end to allow rotation of the end cap 1186 during exercise activities or movements.

In some embodiments, the end cap 1186 can include or define a rope end housing to receive and secure a portion of the rope (see FIG. 10). For example, the rope can include a rope end. The rope can extend through the end cap 1186, with the rope end positioned within the end cap 1186 and shaped or sized to limit removal from the end cap 1186. In some cases, a cap or cover can cover an end of the end cap 1186. One or more gaskets can be positioned within the groove. The gaskets can control the sliding movement of the puck 1182 along the bar and/or limit ingress of objects into the interior of the bar 1034. In other cases, an internal spring element can provide a controlled friction slide of the puck 1182 within the bar.

The puck 1182 can include a housing having a first portion and a second portion. The bar can slidably receive the first portion, such as within the hollow interior of the bar. The second portion can be positioned external to the bar. A bridge between the first portion and the second portion is positioned within the groove 1180 of the bar. A button assembly is connected to the second portion and can include the user controls.

Further, a circuit board can be located within the second portion, and a rechargeable battery can be located within the first portion. A battery cap can secure the battery within the first portion, and the second portion can include a charging port 1192 to connect the battery to a charger. The puck 1182 can also include a light pipe and associated visual indicator 1189 to provide a visual notification to a user, such as a notification that represents a charge state, a battery status, a pairing status, or other notifications or indicators.

In some embodiments, the flex handle, the rigid handle, and the bar (and/or associated strength machines or platforms) can include one or more connected systems, functions, features, or services. For example, the handle electronics can provide battery monitoring, pairing security, location/movement classification, and/or other features supporting performance of a strength machine. In embodiments, the control system 220 can include a signal/feedback disruption feature.

For example, when an attachment 1010 loses wireless communication with the platform 1000, the attachment 1010 can attempt to reconnect. If connection cannot be restored after a set time period, a warning message can be displayed, and the resistance load can be slowly ramped down. In some cases, the resistance load can be slowly ramped down when a connection between the platform 1000 and one or more accessories (e.g., display, computer vision, secondary display, and so on) is lost. When an attachment 1010 with a battery below a certain threshold level, the system 220 can prevent the attachment 1010 from controlling weight or otherwise increasing an applied weight load.

Further, when one handle has a battery level determined to be below a threshold level, the other paired handle can be prevented from controlling the applied load. For example, when mismatched attachments 1010 are moving at the same time, the system may prevent weight from being applied by the platform 1000, among other features.

As described herein, the attachments 1010, in some embodiments, couple or connect to cables or ropes (e.g., the cables 125) that extend out of a platform (e.g., the platform 100) and apply a load or weight for a user during a movement or exercise. In some cases, the attachments 1010 include coupling mechanisms that facilitate the coupling to the cables and prevent other handles (e.g., those not part of or provided with a strength machine) from being connected to coupled. The coupling mechanism can include or provide a universal connector to which any attachment connects (e.g., via a carabiner or other common connection point) to the cables 125.

Further, the cables 125 and/or ropes described herein can be formed with a variety of layers or components. For example, the cable 125 can be a cable, cord, rope, or structure of wound fibers (e.g., non-metallic fibers) and can include an internal core that provides structure and an external jacket that provides comfort to the user, among other layers.

FIGS. 12A-12C illustrate devices or mechanisms that couple handles to cables of a platform-based strength machine. A coupling mechanism 1200 includes a first connector 1204, a second connector 1206, and a button 1210 that selectively releases the first connector 1204 from the second connector 1206. The coupling mechanism 1200 can include a simple and intuitive design. For example, the coupling mechanism 1200 can be activated with one hand via the button 1210. In some cases, the cable attachment mechanism 1020 can include or incorporate the first connector 1204, and the handle attachment mechanism 1015 can include or incorporate the second connector 1206.

FIG. 12B depicts engagement and disengagement of the coupling mechanism 1200. The second connector 1206 inserts into and engages with the first connector 1204 to connect the handle 1010 to the platform 1000. For example, the first connector 1204 can include a female end connected to an end of a platform cable. The second connector 1206 can include a male end connected to a rope 1212 of the handle 1010 (e.g., the rope 1156). The male end of the second connector 1206 inserts into the female end of the first connector 1204 to connect the first connector 1204 and the second connector 1206 together. In some cases, the first connector 1204 and the second connector 1206 rotate with respect to one another, facilitate by the design of the connection.

In some cases, the first connector 1204, which may be connected to a handle or a cable, includes a strike 1220. The second connector 1206, which may be connected to a handle or a cable, includes a latch assembly 1224 for selective engagement with the strike 1220 of the first connector 1204 (e.g., to hold or attach the second connector 1206 to the first connector 1204). The button 1210 can selectively release the latch assembly 1224 from the strike 1220. In some cases, the second connector 1206 includes the button 1210.

FIG. 12C presents an exploded view of the coupling mechanism 1200. The latch assembly 1224 includes a housing 1230 including a male end having multiple slots 1234. The housing 1230 can be a multi-piece element, having top and bottom housing portions secured together via screws or other fasteners. The latch assembly 1224 can include multiple latches 1236 (e.g., a pair of latches 1236). The latches 1236 can be rotatably connected to the housing 1230 (e.g., via pins 1238), such as to selectively extend hooked ends 1240 of the latches 1236 through the slots 1234 to engage the strike 1220. The button 1210 can be coupled to the housing 1230 and configured to engage the latches 1236 to rotate the latches 1236 to disengage the strike 1220. In some cases, the latches 1236 are biased into a locked position. For example, latch assembly 1224 can include a spring 1248 (e.g., a torsion spring) biasing the latches 1236 to a position for engagement with the strike 1220.

As described herein, the attachments 1010 include elements or components that facilitate charging of the attachments 1010, such as via the platform 1000 or other power sources. The attachments 1010 can include indicators or other visual elements that indicate whether a handle is charged, being charged, at a low charge, and so on. Each attachment (e.g., the bar, the flex handle, the rigid handle), as described herein, can include an internal LED that is used to indicate low battery and charge status as well as pairing with a platform 1000 or other system. The LEDs may shine through the housing of the attachments 1010 without having an exposed light pipe, allowing the LEDs to be seamlessly hidden when off or not in use.

Further, the attachments 1010 can include vibration sensors or other haptic components (e.g., haptic motors) that facilitate the presentation of haptic feedback to users. The haptic sensors can present vibration patterns that communicate status information for an attachment, class states or actions (e.g., a movement is starting or a goal has been met), duration information, safety action information (e.g., weight is being ramped down), cues to watch a display, social features (e.g., the user was high-fived), form correction feedback, and information to augment visually presented or aurally presented information for accessibility purposes.

As described herein, the attachments 1010 can be considered “smart” or “intelligent,” such that they can communicate their status, indicate when successfully connected or coupled, provide data or other information associated with their movement or use, receive input and control various aspects of a strength machine (e.g., the applied weight, associated content), and so on. Thus, in some cases, one or more of the attachments 1010 described herein can be interactive and/or to perform actions on behalf of a user.

FIGS. 13A-13B are block diagrams illustrating components 1300 of an interactive attachment or handle for use with a platform-based strength machine. The attachment electrical components 1300 facilitate operation of a platform and associated strength machine, including communications (e.g., with the platform 110), controlling various components, and/or receiving and processing sensor data. The attachment electrical components 1300 can include a power supply 1312, a controller 1314, an input/output (I/O) component 1318, the LED 1250, communications components 1324, attachment logic 1330, and one or more sensors 1334 (e.g., IMUs or magnetometers).

The power supply 1312 can be any power supply suitable to power the handle 1010, or components within the handle 1010. For example, the power supply 1312 can include one or more rechargeable batteries, alkaline or primary batteries, or other power supply components.

In some embodiments, the controller 1314 can be implemented as one or more microprocessors, microcontrollers, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), programmable logic devices (PLDs) (e.g., field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), complex programmable logic devices (CPLDs), field programmable systems on a chip (FPSCs), or other types of programmable devices), or other processing devices used to control the operations of a handle.

The I/O component 1318 can process user actions, such as selections of one or more buttons, and sends a corresponding signal to the controller 1314. The I/O component 1318 can also include an output component, such as a display control or audio control. The I/O component 1318 can include an optional audio/visual component to allow a user to use voice for inputting information by converting audio signals. The I/O component 1318 can enable the user to hear audio.

The communications components 1324 can include wired and/or wireless interfaces for communication with the platform or other associated systems. The wired interfaces can include communications links with various components and can be implemented as one or more physical networks or device connect interfaces (e.g., Ethernet, and/or other protocols). The wireless interfaces can be implemented as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth® (e.g., BLE) cellular, infrared, radio, and/or other types of network interfaces or technologies for wireless communications and can facilitate communications with wireless devices of a strength machine or connected fitness platform. The communications components 1324 can be configured to transmit one or more weight control signals from the user controls 1040 to the platform 1000.

The attachment logic 1330 can be implemented as circuitry and/or a machine-readable medium storing various machine-readable instructions and data. For example, in some embodiments, the attachment logic 1330 stores an operating system and one or more applications as machine-readable instructions that may be read and executed by the controller 1314 to perform various operations. In some embodiments, the attachment logic 1330 is implemented as non-volatile memory (e.g., flash memory, hard drive, solid state drive, or other non-transitory machine-readable mediums), volatile memory, or combinations thereof. The attachment logic 1330 can include status, configuration, and control features, including the various control features disclosed herein.

The sensors 1334 can include sensors for detecting an acceleration and/or position of handle 106 in space. The sensors 1334 can include sensors for detecting a connection status of the handle 1010 with an associated cable of the platform 1000. For example, the sensors 1334 can include an inertial measurement unit (IMU), a magnetometer, an accelerometer, and other movements sensors.

In some cases, the control system 220 can correlate IMU captured information and motor encoder signals as part of a handle detection system. For example, the system can assign symmetric or asymmetric movements of the handle IMU and the motor encoder to a motor. As a result, the system can identify a handle connection, type, and/or left/right determination without electronics in the attachment point (e.g., in the coupling mechanism 1200).

Examples of a Resistance Mechanism for a Strength Machine

As described herein, the platform-based strength machine utilizes a motor, controller, and/or drivetrain to apply and/or control loads applied to handles, which are moved (e.g., pushed, pulled) by users during strength training exercises and activities. FIGS. 14A-14E depict various aspects or components of motors employed by a platform-based strength machine.

As described herein, in some cases the motors provide an adjustable load to a cable when a force is applied to a cable. The force can be applied to a cable by a user pulling or pushing the cable (via a handle or handles), causing the motor to rotate (or attempt to rotate) in a first direction. The motor is also configured to rotate in an opposite direction when a user ceases to apply the force to the cable and/or reduces the amount of force applied to the cable. Thus, the motor applies an equivalent resistance in both directions of rotation, providing equivalent forces or loads during concentric or eccentric movements or workouts.

FIG. 14A depicts a motor 1400. The motor 1400 can include or be part of a spool that spools or wraps a cable. Thus, the motor 1400 can include a motor mechanism and a spool mechanism, or spool, where the motor mechanism controls the load and resistance that a user encounters when the user applies force to a cable, and the cable is spooled around the spool mechanism (e.g., the attached cable wraps around a rope guide that fits over the motor 202 in a single layer).

In such cases, a motor 1400 having an integrated spool can be compact or otherwise sized to be placed at or in various locations of a platform, taking up less space within the platform than other motors, non-direct drive motors, and/or other motors that utilize a geartrain, belts, or separate spools. Further, the motor 1400 can mitigate various operational issues, such as decreasing friction between parts and/or the wearing down of the parts of a motor (e.g., slop).

FIG. 14B presents an exploded view of a motor, such as the motor 1400. The motor 1400 can include a motor stator 1404, motor magnets 1406, a motor lock solenoid 1408, a motor lock pin 1410, a thermal gap pad 1412, and a heat sink 1414. Additionally, the motor 1402 can include a motor housing 1416, a motor shaft 1418, a rope guide 1420, a rope end fitting 1422, and a spool cover 1424.

In some cases, the motor stator 1404 has a cylindrical shape that is placed or disposed on top of the thermal gap pad 1412 and heat sink 1414. The motor stator 1404 can be a stationary component of the motor 1400 and include multiple heat generating coils arranged around the cylinder. The coils can be copper coils. The motor magnets 1406 fit over and surround the motor stator 1404. The motor magnets 1406 rotate around the motor stator 1404 in response to a force applied to a cable to create an electric current within the motor 1400. The motor magnets 1406 can rotate in at least two directions, such as one direction when a force is applied to an attached cable (e.g., a user pulling the cable), and an opposite direction when a cable is released, or an amount of applied force is reduced. The motor magnets 1406 can be part of the motor mechanism that rotates in response to the electric current (or to create electric current).

The motor lock solenoid 1408 and the motor lock pin 1410 are part of a locking mechanism of the motor 1400. The locking mechanism locks the motor 1400 to prevent the motor 1400 from rotating (e.g., moving with minimal movement in any direction of the motor's rotation). To lock the motor 1400, the locking mechanism can use the heat sink 1414 and the motor housing 1416, such that the motor lock in 1410 is disposed or located outside of the motor stator 1404 and motor magnets 1406.

To lock the motor 1400, the motor lock solenoid 1408 pushes or otherwise moves the motor lock pin 1410 through holes in the base of the motor housing 1416 and/or holes in the heat sink 1414, which locks the motor 1400 in place (e.g., prevents the motor from rotating). The lock mechanism may be activated in response to various sensors of a platform, such as sensors that capture information identifying a certain operational state of the platform or strength machine.

The thermal gap pad 1412 is located or disposed between the motor stator 1404 and the heat sink 1414. The thermal gap pad 1412 can have a circular shape and be made from thermally conductive material. The thermal gap pad 1412 can temporarily store and disperse heat generated by the motor 1400 until the heat is propagated through the heat sink 1414 using various thermal dissipation mechanisms or components described herein.

The heat sink 1414 can receive heat generated by the motor stator 1404. The motor stator 1404 can be mounted or disposed on top of the heat sink 1414 with the thermal gap pad 1412 placed between the motor stator 1404 and the heat sink 1414. The heat sink 1414 can be an aluminum heat sink. The heat sink 1414 can have a circular center that fits the shape of the motor stator 1404 and rectangular ends that anchor to the platform.

As described herein, the motor mechanism of the motor 1400 can include the motor stator 1404, the motor magnets 1406, the motor lock solenoid 1408, the motor lock pin 1410, the thermal gap pad 1412 and/or the heat sink 1414.

The motor housing 1416 can have a cylindrical shape or otherwise be shaped to fit over the motor magnets 1406 and the motor stator 1404. The motor housing 1416 can cover the motor magnets 1406 and the motor stator 1404. The motor housing 1416 can have a base with multiple holes 1417 that are parallel to the heat sink 1414. The holes 1417 can be spaced or disposed equidistantly from each other and around the base of the motor housing 1416. The holes 1417 can be part of the locking mechanism that locks the motor 1400, as described herein. The base of the motor housing 1416 can include the rope end fitting 1422. The rope end fitting 1422 can anchor, attach, fix, or secure an end of a rope or cable that wraps around the rope guide 1420.

The motor shaft 1418 passes through the center of the motor housing 1416 and the motor stator 1404 and causes the motor 1400 to spin around the motor shaft 1418 in response to a force applied to the cable or rope.

The rope guide 1420 can have a cylindrical shape and fit over the motor housing 1416. In some cases, the rope guide 1420 attaches to or is part of the motor housing 1416. The rope guide 1420 can have grooves or channels that receive and guide the rope or cable when force is applied to the rope or cable that causes the motor 1400 to spin or rotate. The rope guide 1420 can guide the cable such that the cable wraps and unwraps around the rope guide 1420 in a single horizontal layer (e.g., with some or no overlap between sections of the cable). In some cases, the rope guide 1420 can allow for overlap between sections of the cable.

The spool cover 1424 can have a cylindrical center that fits over the rope guide 1420, the motor housing 1416, and the motor stator 1404. The spool cover 1424 can also have rectangular ends that fit over the heat sink 1414. The spool cover 1424 can attach or be anchored to the platform (e.g., a base of the platform) through the heat sink 1414 using brackets or other attachment components. Further, in some cases, the motor shaft 1418, the motor housing 1416 and/or the brackets can include a shaft end encoder, which measures movement of the motor and provides feedback signals by tracking the speed or position of the motor continuously or at different intervals.

As described herein, the spool mechanism of the motor 1400 can include the motor housing 1416, the rope guide 1420, the rope end fitting 1422 and/or the spool cover 1424. Thus, the motor 1400 can include the motor mechanism, the spool mechanism, and/or the locking mechanism.

FIG. 14C presents a cross-sectional view of the motor 1400. As depicted, the motor stator 1404 is disposed over the heat sink 1414, and the locking mechanism includes the motor lock solenoid 1408 and the motor lock pin 1410 that locks the motor 1400 from rotating. The view of FIG. 14C also shows that the brackets fix the spool cover 1424 to the bottom of the platform, and that the cable 1426 wraps around the rope guide 1420 in a single horizontal layer, with the cable or rope anchored to the rope end fitting 1422.

FIGS. 14D-14E depict the spool mechanism (or spooling mechanism). As described herein, the spool mechanism enables the cable or rope 1426 to wrap around the rope guide 1420 in a single horizontal layer. The cable or rope 1426 can have a nominal diameter that is approximately 5 mm when the cable 1426 is uncompressed. When force is applied to the cable 1426, the cable 1426 may compress to approximately 4 mm, or in some cases less than 4 mm. The rope guide 1420 can include grooves 1428. The grooves 1428 can receive and/or support the cable 1426. The grooves 1428 can also direct or guide the cable 1426 to wrap around the rope guide 1420 in multiple, single, vertical layers as forces are applied to the cable 1426 (e.g., when the motor rotates).

The grooves 1428 can guide the cable 1426 such that the cable 1426 remains in a single horizontal layer, even when the cable 1426 is released (e.g., unspooled) and slack is introduced to the cable 1426. The grooves 1428 can be etched along a vertical surface of the rope guide 1420. The grooves 1428 can have a semi-circular shape. Further, a gap 1430 between the cable 1426 and the spool cover 1424 can have a width or size that enables the cable 1426 to wrap as a single later (and not move over itself onto previously wrapped vertical layer(s). The size of the gap 1430, therefore, is less than a diameter of the cable 1426 when the cable 1426 is in a compressed or an uncompressed state. In some embodiments, the size of the gap 1430 between the cable 1426 and the spool cover 1424 is less than 4 mm (e.g., 2 mm or smaller).

FIG. 14E depicts the cable 1426 wrapped around the rope guide 1420 in a single horizontal layer and multiple vertical layers (e.g., sections of the cable 1426 are stacked in a vertical direction without overlapping). The rope guide 1420 fits on or is disposed on or over the motor housing 1416, and the spool cover 1424 can be placed or disposed over the cable 1426 that is wrapped around the rope guide 1420.

As described herein, the motor 1400 can have a lock or locking mechanism. FIGS. 15A-15D depict aspects of a motor lock mechanism 1500 for a platform-based strength machine, such as a lock mechanism that is part of the motor 1400. The locking mechanism 1500 locks a motor 1400 to stop the motor 1400 from rotating in any direction or orientation (or with minimal movement). The locking mechanism 1500 includes the motor housing 1416, the motor lock solenoid 1408, the motor lock pin 1410, and/or the heat sink 1414.

The locking mechanism 1500 includes holes 1502 or apertures that are spaced around the base of the motor housing 1416. The holes 1502 can be spaced equidistantly from each other and/or in other configurations. The motor lock pin 1410 can fit through one of the holes 1502, locking the motor 1400 from moving (or locking the movement of the motor 1400).

As depicted in FIG. 15B, the heat sink 1414 can also include hole 1505 or apertures configured to receive the motor lock pin. The holes 1505 can match or be aligned with the holes 1505 in the base of the motor housing 1416. The motor lock solenoid 1408 can be attached to the spool cover 1424. The motor lock solenoid 1408 moves or pushes the motor lock pin 1410 into one of the holes 1502 and/or one of the holes 1505 of the heat sink 1414 to lock the motor 1400. Because the holes 1502 are spaced throughout the base of the motor housing 1416, the locking mechanism 1500 can lock the motor 1400 with minimal movement (e.g., movement that is less than a distance between the two holes 1502).

Specifically, as a force is applied to the cable 1426, the motor 1400, including the motor housing 1416, begins to spin. When the locking mechanism 1500 is activated, the motor lock solenoid 1408 pushes the motor lock pin 1410 through one of the holes 1502 in the motor housing 1416 and one of the holes 1505 in the heat sink 1414, thus locking the motor housing 1416 in place and preventing the motor housing 1416 and motor 1400 from spinning when further force is applied to the cable 1426. Further, when the locking mechanism 1500 is activated and the motor lock pin 1410 is pushed through one of the holes 1502 and/or one of the holes 1505 (e.g., when the holes are vertically aligned).

Unlike the holes 1502 that spin with the motor housing 1416, the holes 1505 in the heat sink 1414 are stationary and do not move. To lock the motor in place, the motor lock solenoid 1408 pushes the motor lock pin 1410 through one of the holes 1502 of the base of the motor housing 1416 and through one of the holes 1505 of the heat sink 1414. Once the motor lock pin 1510 is pushed through the holes 1502 and 1505, the motor lock pin 1410 stops the motor from spinning and locks the motor in place. Notably, the holes are in vertical alignment to enable the motor lock pin 1410 to push through and lock the motor in place.

At times, permanent magnet synchronous machines exhibit a variation in torque due to the changing reluctance of the magnetic circuit as the rotor rotates about the stator. For some or all of the motors described herein, the variation in torque (e.g., ripple torque) can be perceived by the user as a variation in weight that oscillates about the desired weight. The amplitude and frequency of the variation in torque changes throughout the operating range of the motor. Although present at all operating points of the motor, the variation in torque can be more perceptible at lower line speeds and weights.

In some embodiments, the platform, such as platform 1000, includes a system or component to mitigate or reduce the torque variations. The system can run the motor in speed control at a low speed (or at varying speeds). The system then captures a torque command and rotor position utilized to run at a constant speed, where torque ripple is the torque command minus the average of the torque command over one motor revolution.

The system can utilize the characterized torque ripple as compensation by adding it to the torque command. Once added, the torque command is no longer a constant and instead changes based on a position of the motor. However, the user feels a constant weight due to the compensation. The system can automate the characterization of the torque ripple, storing the measured characterization in EEPROM of an encoder associated with the motor (such as when the encoder is characterized).

As described herein, the motor 1400 and/or other resistance mechanisms described herein can include a heat sink or other thermal management or cooling components. In addition to sinking heat into aluminum and other structures of the platform 1000, the platform 1000 can include a heat sink 1414 or heat sink 1525, as described herein, as well as other cooling components. FIGS. 16A-16L are diagrams illustrating various cooling components of a platform for a strength machine.

FIG. 16A depicts a thermal mechanism, which includes the motor stator 1404, the thermal gap pad 1412, and the heat sink 1414, where the thermal gap pad 1412 fits between or is otherwise disposed between the motor stator 1404 and the heat sink 1414. The heat sink 1414 can have a rectangular like shape on each end, with a circular or generally circular center. The circular center can include a motor mounting surface 1610 and a motor coil heat sink surface 1614. The motor mounting surface 1610 can mount or otherwise support the motor stator 1404.

The motor coil heat sink surface 1614 can sink or dissipate heat generated by coils 1602 of the motor stator 1404. The thermal gap pad 1412 can be a ring that fits under the circular bottom surface of the motor stator 1404 and on top of the motor coil heat sink surface 1614 of the heat sink 1414. As the motor 1400 spins in response to the force applied to a cable, the coils 1602 in the motor stator 1404 heat up and transfer heat through the thermal gap pad 1412 to the motor coil heat sink surface 1614 of the heat sink 1414. The rectangular ends of the heat sink 1414 can include attachment points (e.g., holes or aperture) that anchor the heat sink 1414 to a platform, base, or other aspect of a strength machine.

FIG. 16B presents additional details via a cross-sectional view of the thermal mechanism. As shown, portions of the coils 1602 of the motor stator 1404 are placed on top of the thermal gap pad 1412. Inner brackets 1618 of the motor stator 1404 are placed or disposed on top of the heat sink 1414. Thus, the heat from the motor stator 1404 transfers to the heat sink 1414 through the inner bracket 1618. In some embodiments, the heat sink 1414 is covered with thermal grease to conduct the heat into an extrusion, space, cavity, or channel.

As described herein, a thermal mechanism can include various components or areas that facilitate the flow of air through a motor or components of a motor. FIGS. 16C-E depict a thermal mechanism that includes air flow components.

As depicted in FIG. 16C, the heat sink 1414 has a rectangular like shape on each end with a circular center. The circular center includes a motor mounting surface 1622 and a motor coil heat sink surface 1624. As described herein, the motor mounting surface 1622 can mount or support the motor stator 1404. The motor coil heat sink surface 1624 can receive and/or sink heat generated from the coils 1602 in the motor stator 1404. The heat sink 1414 can also include airflow channels 1626. The airflow channels 1626 can facilitate the transfer of heat (e.g., convection) received from the coils 1602 to an air circulation system or otherwise out of the motor.

FIGS. 16D-16E present additional details via cross-sectional views of the thermal mechanism depicted in FIG. 16C. As shown, the coils 1602 of the motor stator 1404 are placed or disposed on top of the motor coil heat sink surface 1624. The inner bracket 1618 of the motor stator 1404 is placed on top of the motor mounting surface 1622 of the heat sink 1414. Thus, the heat from the motor stator 1404 can be conducted to the heat sink 1414 through the inner bracket 1618. Further, the airflow channels 1626 that transfer heat away from a motor can utilize fans or other devices that blow air through the airflow channels 1626 and remove the heat from the heat sink 1414.

In some cases, a motor, such as the motor 1400, can employ or be part of an air circulation system. FIG. 16F depicts an air circulation system 1630 for use with a motor, such as the motor 1400. The air circulation system 1630 provides air flow through the thermal mechanism to cool the motor 1400 when the motor 1400 rotates in response to a force applied to a cable. In FIG. 16F, a platform includes two motors 1400, each attached to the metal structure plate 440, which may be a metal plate within a platform.

Each motor 1400 is cooled by the heat sink 1414 and/or a larger heat sink that is located or disposed below the metal structure plate 440. One or more fans 1635 can be attached to air ducts 1637 that are connected to the motors 1400 and the larger heat sink under the metal structure plate 1635. The fans 1635 and the air ducts 1637 can also be attached to the metal structure plate 440. The fans1635 can pull air through the air ducts 1637 to the heat sink 1414 and the larger heat sink below the metal structure plate 440 to cause air to flow around the motors 1400 and within a platform. In some cases, air flowing under or around the motors 1400 can carry or transfer heat away from the heat sinks 1414 and/or the larger heat sink.

FIGS. 16G-16J depict another configuration of an air circulation system 1640. The air configuration system 1640 includes a motor 1400 attached to a metal structure plate 440 of a platform or strength machine. A fan 1645 is also attached to the metal structure plate 440, in parallel, or approximately parallel, with a spool cover of the motor 1400. As the fan 1645 spins, the fan 1645 generates air flow that cools the motor 1400 by pulling air under the motor 1400 through holes 1647 or vents in the metal structure plate 440. The motor 1400 can also include louvered openings 1646 or fins on the rotor to draw air into the motor cooling.

As depicted in FIG. 16H, air flow 1650 passes underneath the metal structure plate 440 and the cooling heat sink 1414 of the motor 1400. The metal structure plate 440 can include multiple channels 1655 having similar or various widths or geometries for conducting the air flow 1650 under the motor 1400. FIG. 161 presents a cross-section view of the channels 1655 of the plate 440, and FIG. 16J presents a cross-sectional view of the air flow 1650 through the channels 1655 of the plate 440.

As described herein, the strength machines include various components that drive and control the motors and other devices within the platforms. FIGS. 17A-17D are diagrams illustrating various electrical components and electrical systems of a platform for a strength machine.

FIG. 17A depicts a power schematic 1700 for a platform, such as the platform 110. The power schematic 1700 includes a wall input 1702 (e.g., an AC port) supplying power to a motor circuit 1704 and a low voltage circuit 1706 when the platform 110 is plugged into a wall outlet. The motor circuit 1704 can include an AC/DC converter 1710 to condition the power received from the wall input 1702. The AC/DC converter 1710 can be an adjustable isolated AC/DC converter rated for 48V and 500 W, although other capabilities are possible. The AC/DC converter 1710, which can be an AC/DC battery charger, can be controlled to provide a constant current and/or a constant voltage output, such as to charge a battery. The motor circuit 1704 can include a diode 1712 or other circuitry to condition the power supplied from the wall input 1702 to the motor(s).

In some embodiments, the power schematic 1700 may include a battery 1718. The battery 1718 can include many configurations or architectures. For example, the battery 1718 can be a lithium-ion battery pack with various sensors and smart circuitry (e.g., battery management system, current sensor, and so on). The battery 1718 can have a target or output voltage to match the voltage of the motor circuit 1704. The battery 1718 can provide a power supply for one or more components of the platform 110, such as the motor(s) and/or other electrical components (e.g., sensors, and so on), when the platform 110 is disconnected from a wall outlet. In some cases, the battery 1718 can provide a power supply when the platform 110 is connected to a wall outlet.

Depending on the application, the battery 1718 can be a removable portable battery with an associated charging dock, a user serviceable internal battery, or a non-serviceable internal battery. As shown, the power schematic 1700 can include a bidirectional power switch 1722 that allows a two-way bidirectional flow of current when in an ON condition and bidirectional voltage blocking when turned OFF. The bidirectional power switch 1722 can allow use of the platform 110 while the battery 1718 is charging (e.g., when plugged into a wall outlet, via regenerative braking, and so on). Depending on the application, the platform 110 may not be usable while the battery 1718 is charging.

The voltage circuit 1706 can include a low power AC/DC converter 1726, such as an isolated low power AC/DC converter, to condition the power received from the wall input 1702. The low voltage circuit 1706 can also include a low power DC/DC converter 1728 connected to the motor circuit 1704, such as to condition power received from the battery 1718. The low voltage circuit 1706 can include a power multiplexer 1730 used to select and transition between two or more input power paths (e.g., the low power AC/DC converter 1726 and the low power DC/DC converter 1728) to a single output (i.e., the system low voltage).

FIG. 17B illustrates various components or devices of the platform 110 described herein. The platform, or strength machine, includes a motor controller 1740. The motor controller 1740 can function to control the motor circuit 1704 and/or the low power voltage circuit 1706. For example, the AC/DC converter 1710 and the low power AC/DC converter 1726 can be connected to the motor controller 1740, such as via various power, ground, and control signal connections. As shown, the battery 1718, a first motor 1705 (e.g., “Motor A”), and a second motor 1715 (e.g., “Motor B”) can be connected to the motor controller 1740.

The motor controller 1740 can control the first motor 1705 and the second motor 1715, such as controlling the power supplied to the first motor 1705 and the second motor 1715 from the wall input 1702 and/or the battery 1718. In some embodiments, the platform 110 can include a fan 1742, which can be connected to and controlled by the motor controller 1740. The fan 1742 can be provided to reduce temperature loads within the platform 110.

The platform 110 includes a motherboard 1750. The motherboard 1750, which may be referred to as a mainboard, a main circuit board, or a system board, among others, can hold and/or allow communication between the motor controller 1740 and various electronic components (e.g., peripherals, processors, controllers, memories, and so on) of the platform 110. For example, the platform 110 can include a user interface 1752, one or more WiFi antennas 1754 (e.g., two separate antennas), a BLE antenna 1756, a cable attachment charger 1758, and one or more sensors 1760 or any combination thereof, connected to the motherboard 1750 (e.g., via one or more power, ground, and/or communication connections).

The user interface 1752 can provide feedback to a user of the platform 110 and/or an associated strength machine and/or allow user selection of one or more features of the platform 110 (e.g., to turn the system on or off, to adjust a load of the platform 110, and so on). The user interface 1752 may include a display (e.g., an LED display, an LCD display, and so on) and/or one or more buttons, sliders, toggles, or switches for user feedback and/or input. For example, the platform 110 and/or the cable attachments can include a switch or other input device to control operation of the platform 110. In some embodiments, the platform 110 can include a display for indicating a status of the platform 110 (e.g., on/off, load, battery level, mode, and so on).

The Wi-Fi antenna 1754 can facilitate a first wireless communication with the platform 110, and the BLE antenna 1756 can facilitate a second wireless communication with the platform 110. For example, the Wi-Fi antenna 1754 can be a 2.4/5 GHz antenna for wireless local area networking (Wi-Fi). The BLE antenna 1756 can be a 2.4 GHz antenna for Bluetooth low energy communication. Of course, the platform 110 can include any combination of antennas (e.g., antennas 1754, 1756), including multiple antennas utilizing the various communication technologies described herein.

A cable attachment charger 1758 (e.g., “handle charger”) can facilitate charging of one or more cable attachments (e.g., handles 1010). For example, the cable attachments can include one or more batteries that are rechargeable through connection with the cable attachment charger 1758. The cable attachment charger 1758 can be integrated into the platform 110. For example, placement of the cable attachments on or in platform 110 may charge the cable attachments. In embodiments, the cable attachments can be plugged into the cable attachment charger 1758 (e.g., via a cord) to charge the cable attachments.

The sensors 1760 can include various sensor configurations for detecting one or more characteristics of the platform 110, the cable attachments, and/or other components of a strength machine. For example, the sensors 1760 can detect one or more characteristics of the first motor 1705, the second motor 1715, the cable attachments, the platform 110, as well as user actions (e.g., movements, voice commands, and so on). The sensors 1760 can include any combination of load sensors, motor encoders, pressure sensors, IMUs, computer vision sensors, audio sensors (e.g., microphones), among other sensors, to detect and/or monitor use of the platform 110 and/or strength machine.

In some cases, the battery 1718 can power the platforms, strength machines, and/or exercise systems described herein. Further, the battery 1718 can regenerate when a user performs concentric movement, generating electric current and partially recharging the battery 1718.

In some cases, the battery 1718 is associated with a controller or control mechanism. The control mechanism controls the amount of energy received by the battery 1718. A control sensor (not shown) can measure the input current that is generated from the energy created by the motor 1400. Further, a brake generator can control the amount of energy received by the battery 1718. The battery 1718 can also include a brake resistor that controls the amount of energy the battery 1718 receives during regeneration. However, in some cases, such as when the battery is fully charged, the brake resistor can disperse regenerated energy as heat, among other functions.

As described herein, a platform can dispose or position one or more motors at different locations within the platform, such that the motors can provide a resistive load via cables passing through tracks 140 of the platform. FIGS. 18A-18F depict various motor configurations of a platform for a strength machine, such as configurations that include drivetrain and cable routing architectures.

The motors, or associated resistance mechanisms, can include a variety of configurations, such as the motor and spool combination described herein (e.g., motor 1400 of FIG. 14A). Other configurations include high torque, low speed motors suitable for direct drive operation, direct drive motors (e.g., pancake motors or other flat motors); hub motors and outer rotor motors; motor and gear combinations; motor, gear, and belt combinations; a motor acting as a gear, a motor acting as a spool (as described herein), and so on.

FIGS. 18A-18B depict a platform-based strength machine 100 that includes a first motor 1810, a second motor 1820, a first spool 1815, a second spool 1825, a first cable 1812, and a second cable 1822. The platform 110 can include multiple resistance systems, such as a first resistance system 1830 and a second resistance system 1840, with each system including a motor, spool, and cable. For example, the first resistance system 1830 can include the first motor 1810, the first spool 1815, and the first cable 1812 to provide the first load to the user. Similarly, the second resistance system 1840 can include the second motor 1820, the second spool 1825, and the second cable 1822 to provide the second load to the user.

As shown, the cables can be routed through one or more pulleys to the carriages or sliders. For example, the first cable 1812 is routed from the first motor 1810/first spool 1815, around a first pulley 1817, and to the first carriage 1819 for connection with one or more cable attachments, such as handles. Similarly, the second cable 1822 is routed from the second motor 1820/second spool 1825, around a second pulley 1827, and to a second carriage 1829 for connection with one or more cable attachments, such as to the same or a different cable attachment (e.g., a handle or a bar). Of course, additional pulleys or other connections can be employed to route cables. For example, the carriages can include one or more pulleys to facilitate routing of the cables through the carriages, as well as smooth operation of the resistance systems, among other benefits.

In some cases, a terminal end of each cable 1812, 1822 can be connected to either a cable attachment or fixed to the platform 110. For example, the first cable 1812 and the second cable 1822 are routed to connect the terminal ends of the cables with a cable attachment, as described herein. Thus, the platform 110 can redirect the force through the platform 110 and not provide a mechanical advantage to the user. As depicted in FIG. 18B, the first cable 1812 and the second cable 1822 are routed to fix the terminal ends of the cables to the platform 110 (e.g., an anchor). Here, a length of the first cable 1812 can be routed through the first carriage 1819 and around a pulley or pulley-like structure of a cable attachment. As a result, the platform 110 can provide a mechanical advantage for the motors, such as a mechanical advantage of 2:1, as depicted. Of course, other routing configurations can realize mechanical advantages of greater than 2:1.

In some cases, the platform 110 can include a differential. FIG. 18C depicts the platform 110 having a differential 1845. Utilizing the differential 1845, the platform 110 can include a single motor (e.g., motor 1847), with each of the first cable 1812 and the second cable 1822 connected to the differential 1845. For example, the differential 1845 can include the first spool 1815 and the second spool 1825. The differential 1845 can enable the first spool 1815 and the second spool 1825 to rotate independent from each other, thereby allowing the first cable 1812 and the second cable 1822 to be extended independent from each other. As shown, the motor 1847 can be coupled to the differential via a belt 1848, although other configurations, including gearing, can be utilized.

As described herein, a platform, such as the platform 110, can provide more than two load connections (e.g., cables coupled to handles). FIG. 18D depicts the platform 110 having four load connections (e.g., although other amounts can be implemented). The first motor 1810 is coupled to a first load pulley 1850 via a first load cable 1852. The first cable 1812 is coupled to the first load pulley 1850, with opposing ends of the first cable 1812 connectable to a cable attachment, such as a handle 1855. One or more guide pulleys 1857 are provided to route the first cable 1812 through the platform 110, such as to direct the opposing ends of the first cable 1812 to different sides of the platform 110 (e.g., to a top side and a right side of the platform 110).

Similarly, the second motor 1820 is coupled to a second load pulley 1860 via a second load cable 1862. The second cable 1822 is coupled to the second load pulley 1860, with opposing ends of the second cable 1822 connectable to a cable attachment, or handle 1855. One or more guide pulleys 1857 route the second cable 1822 through the platform 110, such as to direct the opposing ends of the second cable 1822 to different sides of the platform 110 (e.g., to a bottom side and a left side of the platform 110).

In some cases, the platform 110 can employ additional carriages when adding or accommodating additional load connections. FIG. 18E depicts the use of additional carriages. The first resistance system 1830 and the second resistance system 1840 can include multiple carriages configured to provide a load connection at each carriage. As shown, the first carriage 1819 can be provided or located on one side of the platform 110 (e.g., on the top side of the platform 110) and a third carriage 1170 can be provided on another side of the platform 110 (e.g., the left side of the platform 110) to provide a load connection at the first carriage 1819 and the third carriage 1870. Similarly, the second carriage 1829 can be provided or located on the bottom side of the platform 110 and a fourth carriage 1872 can be provided or located on the right side of the platform 110 to provide a load connection at the second carriage 1829 and the fourth carriage 1872, as described herein.

Further, the use of differential arrangements can provide or add more load connections (e.g., three or more). FIG. 18F depicts the platform 110 having multiple differential arrangements to provide multiple load connections. For example, the platform 110 can include a first differential arrangement 1880 and a second differential arrangement 1890. The first differential arrangement 1880 may include the first motor 1810, the first cable 1812, the second cable 1822, the first spool 1815, the second spool 1825, and a first differential 1885. The second differential arrangement 1890 can include the second motor 1820, a third cable 1891, a fourth cable 1892, a third spool 1893, a fourth spool 1894, and a second differential 1895 allowing the third cable 1891 and the fourth cable 1892 to extend independent from each other. As shown, the first differential arrangement 1880 may position the first cable 1812 and the second cable 1822 on or near different sides of the platform 110, such as on or near the left and bottom sides of the platform 110. The second differential arrangement 1890 can position the third cable 1891 and the fourth cable 1892 on or near different sides of the platform 110 (e.g., on or near the top and right sides of the platform 110), such as on or near sides different than the first cable 1812 and the second cable 1822.

Of course, other configurations of motors, differentials, spools, pulleys, and/or other components can be employed by the platform 110 when providing a variable load to a user of the platform 110.

Examples of a Strength Machine Having a Bench and Platform

As described herein, a strength machine can include or provide a platform and bench as a combination of apparatuses that facilitate a user performing various strength or other fitness activities. FIG. 19A illustrates a nested configuration 1900 for a strength machine having a platform 1904 (e.g., similar to the platforms described herein) and a bench 1902.

The configuration 1900, or system, can include a stacking storage feature that allows all components to nest together (e.g., snuggly) for compact storage, among other benefits. For example, the bench 1902 can nest on be disposed on top of the platform 1904, and attachments 1910 (e.g., flex handle(s), rigid handle, and/or a bar can nest or be placed within integrated storage 1920 of the bench 1902 (e.g., within a crossbar 1925 of the bench 1902).

FIG. 19B illustrates an expanded or operation position of the bench 1902 and platform 1904, such as where the platform 1904 is positioned or disposed under the bench 1902 during exercise activities. The crossbar 1925 engages the top of the platform 1904 during an exercise, such as when a user lays down on the bench 1902 to perform a lifting movement (e.g., a bench press). In some cases, the crossbar 1925 holds or pushes down onto the platform 1904, enabling use of the platform 1904 for exercises performed on the bench 1902. In some cases, the bench 1902 can interface or couple with one or more features of the platform 1904 (e.g., with one or more detents, slots, or other structures of the platform 1904) and/or rest at least partially on the platform 1904.

FIGS. 19C-D depicts another example 1940 of a bench 1942 and the platform 1902. The bench 1942 includes a rear leg 1950 having wheels 1955 for moving the bench, and a front leg 1960 that floats above the floor when the bench 1942 is placed onto the platform 1904. For example, the bench 1942 includes a crossbar 1952 that rests on the platform 1904 to keep the platform 1904 from moving when a user is positioned on the bench 1942 and performing various activities, such as pressing activities with a bar 1945. In some cases, the crossbar 1952 or other components of the bench 1942 can include a sensor that indicates or measured when the bench is correctly positioned on the platform 1904.

FIG. 19E presents a floating feature of the bench 1902, via the front leg 1960. For example, at least a portion of the front leg 1960 can float (e.g., not be in contact with the floor or be raised 1-2 inches above) when the bench 1942 is positioned on the platform 1904 (with or without weight being applied by a user) to ensure the crossbar 1952 contacts the platform 1904. For example, the front leg 1960 may be sized and shaped such that a gap 1980 is defined between the front leg 1960 and the floor when the bench 1942 is positioned or placed on the platform 1904 (e.g., when the crossbar 1952 engages the top of the platform 1904).

Further, FIG. 19F presents a cross-sectional view a pad of the bench 1902 or 1942, depicting various layers of the pad. For example, the pad can include a base panel 1990, a foam 1992 adhered to or disposed on the base panel 1992, a fabric 1994 wrapped around the foam 1992 and at least a portion of the base panel 1990, and a bezel 1996 secured to the base panel 1990. The base panel 1990 can be a rigid panel formed of plastic, metal, or wood (e.g., medium density fiberboard (MDF)). The foam 1992 can be adhered to the base panel 1990 with heat-activated or pressure-activated adhesive. The bezel 1996 can be configured to conceal a connection of the fabric 1994 to the base panel 1990. Of course, in some cases the pad can include more or fewer layers.

Examples of Systems for a Strength Machine

As described herein, various components of a strength machine perform actions to ensure or enhance safe, proper, or intended operation of the strength machine and its associated devices. For example, the handles and/or the platform can include various components and associated systems that detect or determine an unsafe or unintended operation and perform mitigation and/or corrective actions. These systems can include handle detection systems, platform stability systems, and so on.

FIG. 20A depicts components of an attachment detection system 2000 for a platform-based strength machine. The attachment detection system 2000 is associated with a strength machine or exercise system and can be employed for a machine or system that includes multiple handles and/or multiple motors. The attachment detection system 2000, in some embodiments, matches, correlates, and/or associates a specific handle to a corresponding motor of a platform or strength machine. In doing so, the system 2000 can determine whether a handle is paired to a motor and confirm or validate an intended or known handle is being utilized by a user of the strength machine, among other benefits.

The attachment detection system 2000 receives signals from sensors, such as motor sensors 2004A and 2004B and handle sensors 2006A and 2006B. The motor sensor 2004A is coupled to a motor 2003A and detects signals 2008A from a motor encoder of the motor 2003A. The motor sensor 2004B coupled to a motor 2003B and detects signals 2008B from a motor encoder of the motor 2003B. The signals 2008A and 2008B can measure or detect motor acceleration of the respective motors 2003A and 2003B.

In some embodiments, the motor sensor 2004A and 2004B can be the same sensor. In some embodiments, the motor sensor 2004A and the motor sensor 2004B can detect signals 2008A and 2008B over a predefined timer interval. The predefined time interval can be the same or different time interval for the motor sensor 2004A and 2004B.

The handle sensor 2006A can detect signals 2010A generated by the handle 1006A. The handle sensor 2006B can detect signals 2010B generated by the handle 1006B. In some embodiments, the handle 1006A and the handle 1006B can include an inertial measurement unit (IMU). Using the IMUs, the signals 2010A and 2010B from the respective handles 1006A and 1006B are IMU signals that measure inertial acceleration of the handles 1006A and 1006B. In some embodiments, the handle sensor 2006A and the handle sensor 2006B can detect signals 2010A and 2010B over a predefined timer interval. The predefined time interval can be the same or different time interval for handle sensor 2006A and 2006B.

In some cases, the attachment detection system 2000 can collect the signals 2008A, 2008B, 2010A, and 2010B over a predefined time interval, such as 1-3 seconds. The system 2000 generates output information 2012A or 2012B, such as information that identifies whether the handle 1006A corresponds to the motor 2003A or 2003B. The output information 2012B identifies whether the handle 1006B corresponds to the motor 2003A or 2003B.

To generate the output information 2012A and 2012B, the attachment detection system 2000 utilizes a handle detection algorithm or other computing techniques. The handle detection algorithm determines a difference between the signals 2008A and 2008B generated by motor encoders of the motors 2003A and 2003B. The difference between signals 2008A and 2008B can be determined from motor acceleration data 2014. The handle detection algorithm can also determine a difference between signals 2010A and 2010B from the handles 1006A and 1006B. Further, a difference between signals 2010A and 2010B can be from IMU acceleration data 2016.

The graph depicted in FIG. 20B presents a plot of the differences between the motor acceleration data 2014 and the IMU acceleration data 2016. When there is a positive correlation of the data, the handle detection algorithm determines that the motor 2003A is attached to the handle 1006A and that the motor 2003B is attached to the handle 1006B. When there is a negative correlation, the handle detection algorithm determines the motor 2003B is attached to the handle 1006A and the motor 2003A is attached to the handle 1006B. Once determined, the handle detection algorithm establishes a connection between the handles 1006A-1006B and the motors 2003A-2003B as indicated by the output information 2012A-2012B.

As described herein, a platform stability system can determine movement of a platform (e.g., the platform 110), and modify use of the strength machine to avoid or prevent unsafe or unintended use of the machine, among other things. FIG. 21 depicts a stability system 2100 for a platform-based strength machine.

The stability system 2100 includes an IMU sensor system 2104 and a weight sensor system 2106. The IMU sensor system 2104 can sense acceleration and/or orientation of a platform, such as the platform 110 to detect when the platform 110 is mobile, about to lift off, sliding on the ground, being pulled up at one edge, and so on. The IMU sensor system 2104, via IMUs, can also detect when the platform 110 is positioned in an unintended orientation, such as when the platform 110 is standing against the wall instead of laying on the floor or otherwise propped up at an angle.

As described herein, a platform, such as the platform 110, can include one or more weight sensors, such as the load cells described herein. The weight sensors, or load cells, can be disposed in a corner of the platform and can measure contact between the platform and the ground. The weight sensor system 2106 can use the load cells or other weight sensors to determine a weight placed on the platform as well as a distribution of the weight on the platform when a user is standing on top of the platform.

The load cells can detect a change in the weight distribution on the platform in a vertical or horizontal direction. For example, the weight sensor system 2106 can determine if a weight of a user standing or otherwise positioned on top of the platform is evenly distributed over the platform. If the weight sensor system 2106 determines a normal weight distribution (e.g., when a weight of the user is evenly distributed over the platform), the platform can operate as intended (e.g., continue to provide load and resistance during an exercise).

However, when the weight sensor system 2106 determines an abnormal distribution (e.g., one area of a platform has a lesser weight distribution than other area(a) that is lower than a threshold difference, or vice versa), the weight sensor stability system 2106 can determine that platform is about to lose contact with the ground and can cause the platform to begin to ramp down the applied load. Further, the system 2106 can utilize load cell information to determine whether a user is standing on/off the platform. The platform can then limit or control an amount (e.g., a maximum) of an applied load based on whether the user is on the platform, off the platform, partially on the platform (e.g., one hand or foot on the platform) and so on.

For example, a user weighing 100 pounds steps on top of the platform, which also weighs 100 pounds (e.g., where a combined weight of 200 pounds keeps the platform firmly in contact with the floor during strength movements that apply an upward force to the platform). When the user stands on a center area of the platform, the four load cells at each corner of the platform detect a generally equal weight or applied force, and the weight sensor system 2106 identifies or determines a normal weight distribution.

However, when the user moves too far in any direction (e.g., towards an edge of the platform), the load cells at one edge of the platform can detect a greater weight than the load cells at the other side of the platform). The system 2100 can determine a difference in the weight distribution that is above a threshold (e.g., 2:1 or higher), and cause the platform to lower or ramp down the applied load, to deter or prevent the platform from lifting off the floor when the user is applying a force during a strength movement. As another example, the system 2100 can modify operations when a load cell or other weight sensor determines one or more feet of the platform no longer engage or contact the floor.

The system 2100 can utilize various load ramping techniques, such as a linear lowering of the applied load, a stepwise lowering of the load, and so on. Further, the system 2100 can inform or notify the user of the ramping down operation, such as via the display 610, an associated display or system, and so on.

FIG. 22 is a flow diagram illustrating a method 2200 for adjusting operations of a platform, such as the platform 110. The method 2200 may be performed by the control system 220 of the platform 110, accordingly, is described herein merely by way of reference thereto. It will be appreciated that the method 2200 may be performed on any suitable hardware.

In operation 2210, the control system 220 receives information from one or more sensors of the platform, wherein the information identifies an unintended movement of the platform. For example, the control system 220 can receive acceleration information received from single or multiple inertial measurement units (IMUs) of the platform, where the identified unintended movement of the platform is determined by multiple inertial measurement units (IMUs) of the platform capturing information that indicates an actual lifting of the platform off the floor.

As another example, the control system 220 can receive weight distribution information received from multiple load cells of the platform, where the identified unintended movement of the platform is determined by multiple load cells of the platform capturing the weight distribution information that indicates an imminent or predicted lifting of the platform off the floor.

In operation 2220, the control system 220 performs an action to adjust a current operation of the platform in response to the identified unintended movement of the platform. For example, the control system 220 can ramp down a load applied to one or more cables of the strength machine coupled to handles held by the user performing the strength activity, shut off the motor, lock the motor, and so on.

FIG. 23 is a flow diagram illustrating a method 2300 of determining that a handle is paired to a motor. The method 2300 may be performed by the control system 220 of the platform 110, accordingly, is described herein merely by way of reference thereto. It will be appreciated that the method 2300 may be performed on any suitable hardware.

In operation 2310, the control system 220 receives information captured by an inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the handle, and in operation 2320, receives information captured by an encoder of a motor of the platform-based strength machine.

In operation 2330, the control system 220 determines the handle is physically coupled to the motor based on a comparison of the information captured by the inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the handle and the information captured by the encoder of the motor. For example, the system 220 determines the handle is physically coupled to the motor when acceleration information captured by the inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the handle positively correlates to acceleration information captured by the encoder of the motor, such as over a certain time period or duration.

In some cases, the system 220 sends information to a control system of the platform that indicates a known handle is physically coupled to the motor upon determining a positive correlation between the information captured by the inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the handle and the information captured by the encoder of the motor for a certain period of time or time interval.

FIG. 24 is a flow diagram illustrating a method 2400 of controlling operations of a strength machine. The method 2400 may be performed by the control system 220 of the platform 110, accordingly, is described herein merely by way of reference thereto. It will be appreciated that the method 2400 may be performed on any suitable hardware.

In operation 2410, the control system 220 receives an indication that a handle is coupled to a cable attached to the resistance mechanism, where the resistance mechanism is configured to apply a load to the handle via the cable during operation of the platform-based strength machine.

In operation 2420, the control system 220 captures movement information associated with the handle by one or more inertial measurement units (IMUs) of the handle, and in operation 2430, enables the resistance mechanism to apply the load to the handle in response to determining from the captured movement information that the handle is known to the control system 220 of the platform-based strength machine.

FIG. 25 is a flow diagram illustrating a method 2500 of performing movement tracking for a user. The method 2500 may be performed by the follow along system 352 and, accordingly, is described herein merely by way of reference thereto. It will be appreciated that the method 2500 may be performed on any suitable hardware.

In operation 2510, the system 352 captures, receives, or accesses information measured by one or more sensors contained by handles of the platform-based strength machine and held by the user during the movements performed by the user. For example, the movements are identified within an instructor-led class presented to the user that the user is following while performing the movements using the platform-based strength machine. In operation 2520, the system 352 compares the capturing information to information associated with the movements performed by the user. In operation 2530, the system 352 determines the user performed the movements based on the comparison.

FIG. 26 is a flow diagram illustrating a method 2600 of performing movement tracking for a user. The method 2600 may be performed by the follow along system 352 and, accordingly, is described herein merely by way of reference thereto. It will be appreciated that the method 2600 may be performed on any suitable hardware.

In operation 2610, the system 352 captures, receives, or accesses information measured by one or more sensors contained by handles of the platform-based strength machine and held by the user during the movements performed by the user. In operation 2620, the system 352 captures a pose of the user when the information is captured by the one or more sensors, and, in operation 2630, the system 352 determines the user performed the movements based on the comparison and based on the captured pose of the user.

FIG. 27 is a flow diagram illustrating a method 2700 for presenting class information to a user of an exercise class. The method 2700 may be performed by the exercise content system 335 and, accordingly, is described herein merely by way of reference thereto. It will be appreciated that the method 2700 may be performed on any suitable hardware.

In operation 2710, the exercise content system 335 counts a number of repetitions performed by the user and performed by the other users of the group of users (for a given movement within the interactive class). For example, the system 335 counts the repetitions based on acceleration information captured by inertial measurement units (IMUs) within handles of the platform-based strength machine, where the handles are coupled to a motor of the platform-based strength machine that applies a resistive load to the user via the handles when the user performs the movements during the interactive class. In some cases, the system 335 also utilizes various computer vision techniques described herein and/or input from sensors on devices wearable by the user (e.g., a heart rate monitor or smart watch).

In operation 2720, the system 335 synchronizes the user repetitions to repetitions of other users in the class, and in operation 2730, presents to the user via a display associated with the platform-based strength machine an updating ranked list for the given movement that includes the user and the other users of the interactive class, such as a leaderboard for the class.

FIG. 28 depicts a user interface presenting an example leaderboard 2800.

The leaderboard 2800 displays or presents a constantly or periodically updating ranked list 2810 of users, such as during a specific segment (e.g., a “dead lift” segment) for an exercise class. As shown the user “AnotherDorian” 2815 is placed on the leaderboard with other users (e.g., EmmaF 2820) based on a ranking of the number of repetitions 2825 performed during the segment. In some cases, the leaderboard can rank the users 2820 based on other metrics, such as their total weight lifted for the segment 2830, or other metrics.

Example Embodiments of a Platform-Based Strength Machine

A strength machine or exercise machine, as described throughout the Specification, can combine or implement various components, systems, and/or capabilities depicted in the Figures and associated details. What follows are various example embodiments of the strength machine or exercise machine.

As described herein, the strength machine provides a track mechanism, or cable attachment mechanism, that enables a user to utilize different pull points when engaging the handles. The track mechanism can include multiple tracks, and facilitates the user to adjust, modify, and/or tailor the configuration of the platform before performing various strength movements. In some cases, the track mechanism includes locking features or components, which lock the pull points and/or monitor intended positioning of the pull points to provide safe, reliable, intended operations of the strength machine, among other benefits.

For example, an exercise machine can include a platform that is configured to be placed on a floor and has a top surface upon which a user stands when performing a strength activity using the exercise machine, where the platform contains a motor and a motor controller, a track disposed at least partially within a top surface of the platform, where the track includes multiple selectable pull points through which a cable extends from the motor out of the platform, and a handle coupled to the cable.

In some cases, the track mechanism includes multiple stop positions and a carriage that travels along the track mechanism. The carriage can include a carriage body, one or more rollers rotatably fixed to the carriage body that engage the track mechanism, and a cable guide through which the cable extends from the motor out of the platform.

In some cases, the track mechanism designates multiple stop positions and a carriage that travels along the track mechanism. The carriage can include a cable guide through which the cable extends from the motor out of the platform and an indexing roller and lock pin that lock the carriage into the multiple stop positions of the track mechanism.

In some cases, the track mechanism includes a carriage that travels along the track mechanism. The carriage can include a cable guide through which the cable extends from the motor out of the platform and one or more magnets that are detected by the sensors located at each of the multiple grooves of the sensor rail.

In some cases, the track mechanism can include a sensor rail having multiple grooves and sensors located at each of the multiple grooves and configured to detect a position of a carriage as the carriage travels along the track mechanism.

In some cases, the track mechanism can include a carriage that travels along the track mechanism. The carriage can include a button that, when pressed, facilitates the carriage to move along the track mechanism to locations associated with the pull points, a cable guide through which the cable extends from the motor out of the platform, and one or more sensors that provide information that identifies a status of the button and a status of a position of the carriage along the track mechanism.

In some cases, the exercise machine includes a second motor (or multiple motors), a second track mechanism (or multiple track mechanisms) disposed at least partially within the top surface of the platform, and a second handle (or multiple handles) coupled to the second cable.

As another example, a track mechanism, located on or partially within, a top surface of a platform that includes an internal motor and a motor controller that controls operation of the internal motor, can include multiple stop positions and a carriage that travels along the track mechanism to the multiple stop positions. The carriage, or slider, can include a cable guide through which a cable extends from the internal motor out of the platform and a button that, when pressed, facilitates the carriage to move along the track mechanism to the multiple stop positions.

In some cases, the track mechanism includes a sensor rail having multiple grooves at the multiple stop positions and sensors located at each of the multiple grooves that are configured to detect a position of the carriage at one of the multiple stop positions.

In some cases, the track mechanism includes a sensor rail having hall effect sensors disposed at each of the multiple stop positions, where the carriage includes one or more magnets that are detected by the hall effect sensors at each of the multiple stop positions.

In some embodiments, the platform of the strength machine is configured and/or designed to provide a surface or contact area that enables a user to perform strength movements and other exercises comfortably and safely. In some cases, the platform can include certain layers that provide different functionalities (e.g., comfort or contact, information display, support, stability, and so on).

For example, a strength machine includes a platform that is configured to be placed on a floor and has a top surface upon which a user stands when performing a strength activity using the exercise machine, one or more resistance mechanisms contained within the platform, one or more cables attached to the one or more resistance mechanisms that extend out of one or more pull points disposed on the top surface of the platform, one or more handles coupled to the one or more cables, and multiple inertial measurement units (IMUs) that detect movement of the platform.

In some cases, the resistance mechanisms include an integrated motor and spool device, where a cable of the one or more cables associated with the integrated motor and spool device is configured to wrap around the spool device.

In some cases, the resistance mechanisms include a motor, a drivetrain, and a motor controller.

As another example, a platform for use with a strength machine includes one or more resistance mechanisms contained within the platform, one or more cables attached to the one or more resistance mechanisms that extend out of one or more pull points disposed on the top surface of the platform, a top surface upon which a user stands when performing a strength activity using the strength machine, and a display (e.g., a LED display) integrated into the top surface of the platform, where the display is configured to display status information about operation of the platform.

In some cases, the top surface is formed of a woven textile layer and a protective layer, and the display is an organic light emitting diode (OLED) display.

In some cases, the platform includes a mounting plate disposed below the top surface upon which the one or more resistance mechanisms are mounted.

In some cases, the platform includes a track located on the top surface of the platform. The track includes a track mechanism that includes multiple stop positions associated with the one or more pull points and a carriage that travels along the track mechanism to the multiple stop positions. The carriage can include a cable guide through which the one or more cables extend out at the one or more pull points and a button that, when pressed, facilitates the carriage to move along the track mechanism to the multiple stop positions.

As another example, a platform for use with a strength machine can include a top surface upon which a user stands when performing a strength activity using the strength machine, one or more resistance mechanisms contained within the platform, one or more tracks disposed on the top surface that each define multiple pull points, and one or more cables attached to the one or more resistance mechanisms that extend out of the multiple pull points for the one or more tracks.

In some cases, the platform can include two track mechanisms that have multiple pull points and is associated with a resistance mechanism. The two track mechanisms can include two vertically aligned track mechanisms, where each of the two vertically aligned track mechanisms includes multiple pull points and is associated with a resistance mechanism.

The two track mechanisms can also include two horizontally aligned track mechanisms, where each of the two horizontally aligned track mechanisms includes multiple pull points and is associated with a resistance mechanism. In some cases, a track mechanism can be a two-dimensional track mechanisms having at least one vertically aligned track segment and at least one horizontally aligned track segment.

In some embodiments, the strength machine included handles, bars, or other user engagement or interface devices that facilitate the strength movements and provide a user with control of the platform and associated content during activities. In some cases, the handles or interface devices can include user controls, sensors, coupling mechanisms, and/or other features that enable a user to control the operation of the platform, control an associated class or other content, and so on. Further, various connected fitness systems, such as repetition counting systems, form tracking systems, safety systems, motor control systems, and so on, can utilize information captured or measured by the handles during activities, among other benefits.

For example, a strength machine includes a platform that is configured to be placed on a floor and has a top surface upon which a user stands when performing a strength activity using the strength machine and one or more handles that are coupled to the platform via cables that apply a load to the one or more handles via movement of a motor internal to the platform, where each of the handles includes user controls, the user controls configured to control operation of the motor internal to the platform.

In some cases, the user controls include a button configured to control a weight level applied to the one or more handles and/or a button configured to control a class presented to the user when the user performs the strength activity using the strength machine.

In some cases, the one or more handles include an inertial measurement unit (IMU) that tracks movement of the one or more handles during performance of the strength activity using the strength machine. The handles can be a flex handle, a rigid handle, a bar, or other handles described herein.

As another example, a handle for use with a strength machine includes a handle cable that couples the handle to a platform cable of a platform of the strength machine, where the platform applies a load to the handle via movement of an internal motor of the platform to which the platform cable is attached, a first connector that is fixed to the handle cable, a second connector that is fixed to the platform cable, and a button that selectively releases the first connector from the second connector.

In some cases, the first connector includes a strike, the second connector includes a latch assembly, and the button selectively releases the latch assembly from the strike.

As another example, a handle for use with a strength machine includes a handle cable that couples the handle to a platform cable of a platform of the strength machine, where the platform applies a load to the handle via movement of an internal motor of the platform to which the platform cable is attached and one or more inertial measurement units (IMUs) that measure movement of the handle when a user performs an activity using the strength machine. In some cases, the IMUs measure movement of the handle in three-dimensional space.

In some cases, the handle includes a handle communication component that causes the handle to directly communicate data measured by the IMUs to a control system of the platform.

In some embodiments, the strength machine includes a motor or other resistance mechanism (or multiple motors or resistance mechanism) that applies a load for a user when performing strength activities. The motor, in some cases, can include an integrated spool that wraps or otherwise maintains a cable or rope that is coupled to the handles via which the user engages with the platform. Further, the motor can include various locking mechanisms, which prevent rotation of the motor during unintended uses, among other benefits. Thus, various motors described herein can include a motor mechanism, a spool mechanism, and/or a locking mechanism.

For example, a strength machine includes a platform that is configured to be placed on a floor and has a top surface upon which a user stands when performing a strength activity using the exercise machine, one or more resistance mechanisms contained within the platform, where the one or more resistance mechanisms include an integrated motor and spool device, one or more cables attached to the spool device that extend out of one or more pull points disposed on the top surface of the platform, and one or more handles coupled to the one or more cables.

In some cases, the spool device includes grooves that receive sections of the one or more cables when the one or more cables wrap around the spool device. In some cases, the spool device is configured to wrap the one or more cables in a single horizontal layer.

As another example, a motor for use with a platform-based strength machine includes a motor mechanism that controls operation of the motor to apply a load to a cable attached to the motor when the cable extends out of a platform that contains the motor, a spool mechanism that maintains the cable in a wrapped configuration, and a locking mechanism that locks the motor from rotating when the platform-based strength machine is not in use by a user. In some cases, the spool mechanism is integrated into the motor mechanism.

In some cases, the locking mechanism includes a motor lock pin and a motor lock solenoid configured to move the motor lock pin into one or more holes disposed on a base of a motor housing of the motor.

In some cases, the motor includes a heat sink disposed below a base of a motor housing of the motor, a motor lock pin, and a motor lock solenoid configured to move the motor lock pin into one or more holes disposed on the base of the motor housing of the motor and one or more holes of the heat sink that are aligned with the one or more holes of the base of the motor housing.

In some cases, the motor lock solenoid causes the motor lock pin to move into the one or more holes disposed on the base of the motor housing of the motor in response to an unintended movement of the platform that contains the movement. In some cases, the motor lock solenoid causes the motor lock pin to move into the one or more holes disposed on the base of the motor housing of the motor in response to an unintended movement of a handle coupled to the cable that is pulled by a user of the platform-based strength machine.

In some embodiments, the strength machine includes the platform and an associated bench. The bench can have a geometry that facilitates placing the bench on the platform during certain strength movements (e.g., bench press), as well as components that store or contain handles and/or accessories of the strength machine.

For example, a strength machine includes a platform that is configured to be placed on a floor and has a top surface upon which a user is positioned when performing a strength activity using the exercise machine, wherein the platform contains a motor, a drivetrain, and a motor controller, a handle that couples to the motor via a cable that extends out of the platform between the motor and the handle, and a bench configured to be placed onto the top surface of the platform and apply a downward force to the platform when the user is positioned on the bench when performing the strength activity.

In some cases, the bench includes a front leg that is shorter than a rear leg, and wherein the front leg contacts a floor (or floats above the floor) that supports the platform when the user is positioned on the bench when performing the strength activity.

In some cases, the strength machine includes tracks disposed on each side of the top surface of the platform, where the tracks include multiple selectable pull points through which a cable extends from the motor out of the platform, and where the bench is configured to be placed between the tracks on each side of the top surface of the platform.

In some cases, the bench includes a crossbar that extends between legs of the bench and applies the downward force to the platform when the user is positioned on the bench when performing the strength activity and/or that includes a storage area to store additional handles of the strength machine.

In some embodiments, the strength machine includes or is associated with various safety or operation systems, which utilize data captured from the strength machine and perform actions to mitigate unsafe or unintended conditions. For example, the strength machine can employ a handle detection system that controls operation of the strength machine based on an identification of the handles coupled to the machine, a platform stability system that controls operation of the strength machine based on a measured or tracked orientation of the platform, and so on.

For example, a method of mitigating an unsafe operational condition of a platform of a strength machine, where the platform is configured to be placed on a floor and has a top surface upon which a user is positioned when performing a strength activity using the strength machine, includes receiving information from one or more sensors of the platform, wherein the information identifies an unintended movement of the platform and performing an action to adjust a current operation of the platform in response to the identified unintended movement of the platform.

In some cases, the information is acceleration information received from multiple inertial measurement units (IMUs) of the platform, and the performed action is to ramp down a load applied to one or more cables of the strength machine coupled to handles held by the user performing the strength activity.

In some cases, the identified unintended movement of the platform is determined by multiple inertial measurement units (IMUs) of the platform capturing information that indicates an actual lifting of the platform off the floor, and the performed action is to ramp down a load applied to one or more cables of the strength machine coupled to handles held by the user performing the strength activity.

In some cases, the information is weight distribution information received from multiple load cells of the platform, and the performed action is to ramp down a load applied to one or more cables of the strength machine coupled to handles held by the user performing the strength activity.

In some cases, the identified unintended movement of the platform is determined by multiple load cells of the platform capturing weight distribution information that indicates an imminent or predicted lifting of the platform off the floor, and the performed action is to ramp down a load applied to one or more cables of the strength machine coupled to handles held by the user performing the strength activity.

As another example, a system can determine a handle is paired to a platform-based strength machine by receiving information captured by an inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the handle, receiving information capturing by an encoder of a motor of the platform-based strength machine, and determining the handle is physically coupled to the motor based on a comparison of the information captured by the inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the handle and the information capturing by the encoder of the motor.

In some cases, the system determines the handle is physically coupled to the motor when acceleration information captured by the inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the handle positively correlates to acceleration information captured by the encoder of the motor.

In some cases, the system determines the handle is physically coupled to the motor when acceleration information captured by the inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the handle positively correlates to acceleration information captured by the encoder of the motor for a certain period of time.

In some cases, the system sends information to a control system of the platform that indicates a known handle is physically coupled to the motor upon determining a positive correlation between the information captured by the inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the handle and the information captured by the encoder of the motor for a certain period of time.

As another example, a platform-based strength machine controls operations of a resistance mechanism of the platform-based strength machine by receiving an indication that a handle is coupled to a cable attached to the resistance mechanism, where the resistance mechanism is configured to apply a load to the handle via the cable during operation of the platform-based strength machine, capturing movement information associated with the handle by one or more inertial measurement units (IMUs) of the handle, and enabling the resistance mechanism to apply the load to the handle in response to determining from the captured movement information that the handle is known to the control system of the platform-based strength machine.

In some cases, the system determines a positive correlation between the captured movement information and movement information of a motor of the resistance mechanism.

Further, in some embodiments, the strength machine can present or be associated with different types of content or services/applications that enhance the activities performed by the user. For example, the user can perform activities with the strength machine during a class (streamed live or pre-recorded) and can view or control various aspects of the class (such as via the handles). Further, the content can present or track various types of information, such as leaderboard or ranking information that reflects the user's effort with respect to other users, tracking information that indicates the activities performed by the user, form information that captures how a user performs certain activities, and so on.

For example, a method of tracking movements performed by a user of a platform-based strength machine includes capturing information measured by one or more sensors contained by handles of the platform-based strength machine and held by the user during the movements performed by the user, comparing the capturing information to information associated with the movements performed by the user, and determining the user performed the movements based on the comparison.

In some cases, the movements are identified within an instructor-led class presented to the user that the user is following while performing the movements using the platform-based strength machine. In some cases, the information is captured by the one or more sensors includes acceleration information captured by inertial measurement units (IMUs) of the handles.

In some cases, the method includes capturing a pose or movement of the user when the information is captured by the one or more sensors, and determining the user performed the movements based on the comparison and based on the captured pose of the user.

In some cases, the method includes measuring rotation of a motor of the platform-based strength machine during the movements performed by the user, and determining the user performed the movements based on the comparison and based on the measured rotation of the motor.

As another example, a method of ranking a user performing movements using a platform-based strength machine during an interactive class that includes a group of other users includes counting a number of repetitions performed by the user and performed by the other users of the group of users (for a given movement within the interactive class), and presenting to the user via a display associated with the platform-based strength machine an updating ranked list for the given movement that includes the user and the other users of the interactive class.

In some cases, the method counts the repetitions based on acceleration information captured by inertial measurement units (IMUs) within handles of the platform-based strength machine, where the handles are coupled to a motor of the platform-based strength machine that applies a resistive load to the user via the handles when the user performs the movements during the interactive class.

In some cases, the updating ranked list is a leaderboard displayed to all users of the interactive class.

CONCLUSION

Unless the context clearly requires otherwise, throughout the description and the claims, the words “comprise,” “comprising,” and the like are to be construed in an inclusive sense, as opposed to an exclusive or exhaustive sense; that is to say, in the sense of “including, but not limited to.” As used herein, the terms “connected,” “coupled,” or any variant thereof, means any connection or coupling, either direct or indirect, between two or more elements; the coupling of connection between the elements can be physical, logical, or a combination thereof. Additionally, the words “herein,” “above,” “below,” and words of similar import, when used in this application, shall refer to this application as a whole and not to any particular portions of this application. Where the context permits, words in the above Detailed Description using the singular or plural number may also include the plural or singular number respectively. The word “or”, in reference to a list of two or more items, covers all of the following interpretations of the word: any of the items in the list, all of the items in the list, and any combination of the items in the list.

The above detailed description of embodiments of the disclosure is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the teachings to the precise form disclosed above. While specific embodiments of, and examples for, the disclosure are described above for illustrative purposes, various equivalent modifications are possible within the scope of the disclosure, as those skilled in the relevant art will recognize.

The teachings of the disclosure provided herein can be applied to other systems, not necessarily the system described above. The elements and acts of the various embodiments described above can be combined to provide further embodiments.

Any patents and applications and other references noted above, including any that may be listed in accompanying filing papers, are incorporated herein by reference. Aspects of the disclosure can be modified, if necessary, to employ the systems, functions, and concepts of the various references described above to provide yet further embodiments of the disclosure.

These and other changes can be made to the disclosure in light of the above Detailed Description. While the above description describes certain embodiments of the disclosure, and describes the best mode contemplated, no matter how detailed the above appears in text, the teachings can be practiced in many ways. Details of the exercise machine and platform may vary considerably in its implementation details, while still being encompassed by the subject matter disclosed herein. As noted above, particular terminology used when describing certain features or aspects of the disclosure should not be taken to imply that the terminology is being redefined herein to be restricted to any specific characteristics, features, or aspects of the disclosure with which that terminology is associated. In general, the terms used in the following claims should not be construed to limit the disclosure to the specific embodiments disclosed in the specification, unless the above Detailed Description section explicitly defines such terms. Accordingly, the actual scope of the disclosure encompasses not only the disclosed embodiments, but also all equivalent ways of practicing or implementing the disclosure under the claims.

From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that specific embodiments have been described herein for purposes of illustration, but that various modifications may be made without deviating from the spirit and scope of the embodiments. Accordingly, the embodiments are not limited except as by the appended claims.

Claims

1. An exercise machine, comprising:

a platform that is configured to be placed on a floor and has a top surface upon which a user stands when performing a strength activity using the exercise machine, wherein the platform contains a motor and a motor controller;
a cable adjustment mechanism disposed at least partially within a top surface of the platform, wherein the cable adjustment mechanism includes multiple selectable pull points through which a cable extends from the motor out of the platform; and
an attachment coupled to the cable.

2. The exercise machine of claim 1, wherein the cable adjustment mechanism disposed at least partially within a top surface of the platform includes:

a track that includes multiple stop positions; and
a carriage that travels along the track and includes: a carriage body; one or more rollers rotatably fixed to the carriage body that engage the track; and a cable guide through which the cable extends from the motor out of the platform.

3. The exercise machine of claim 1, wherein the cable adjustment mechanism disposed at least partially within a top surface of the platform includes:

a track that designates multiple index positions;
a carriage that travels along the track and includes: a cable guide through which the cable extends from the motor out of the platform; and an indexing roller and lock pin that lock the carriage into the multiple index positions of the track.

4. The exercise machine of claim 1, wherein the cable adjustment mechanism disposed at least partially within a top surface of the platform includes:

a carriage that travels along a track of the cable adjustment mechanism and includes: a cable guide through which the cable extends from the motor out of the platform; and one or more magnets that are detected by sensors located at multiple grooves of a sensor rail of the track.

5. The exercise machine of claim 1, wherein the cable adjustment mechanism disposed at least partially within a top surface of the platform includes:

a sensor rail having multiple grooves and sensors located at each of the multiple grooves and configured to detect a position of a carriage as the carriage travels along the cable adjustment mechanism.

6. The exercise machine of claim 1, wherein the cable adjustment mechanism disposed at least partially within a top surface of the platform includes:

a carriage that travels along the cable adjustment mechanism and includes: a button that, when pressed, facilitates the carriage to move along the cable adjustment mechanism to locations associated with the pull points; a cable guide through which the cable extends from the motor out of the platform; and one or more sensors that provide information that identifies a status of the button and a status of a position of the carriage along the cable adjustment mechanism.

7. The exercise machine of claim 1, further comprising:

a second motor;
a second cable adjustment mechanism disposed at least partially within the top surface of the platform, wherein the second cable adjustment mechanism includes second multiple selectable pull points through which a second cable extends from the second motor out of the platform; and a second attachment coupled to the second cable.

8. A cable adjustment mechanism located on a top surface of a platform that includes an internal motor and a motor controller that controls operation of the internal motor, wherein the cable adjustment mechanism comprises:

a track that includes multiple stop positions; and
a carriage that travels along the track to the multiple stop positions and includes: a cable guide through which a cable extends from the internal motor out of the platform; and a button that, when pressed, facilitates the carriage to move along the track to the multiple stop positions.

9. The cable adjustment mechanism of claim 8, wherein the track includes:

a sensor rail having multiple locating features at the multiple stop positions and sensors located at each of the multiple locating features that are configured to detect a position of the carriage at one of the multiple stop positions.

10. The cable adjustment mechanism of claim 8, wherein the track includes:

a sensor rail having hall effect sensors disposed at each of the multiple stop positions;
wherein the carriage includes one or more magnets that are detected by the hall effect sensors at each of the multiple stop positions.

11-18. (canceled)

19. A platform for use with a strength machine, the platform comprising:

a top surface upon which a user stands when performing a strength activity using the strength machine;
one or more resistance mechanisms contained within the platform;
one or more cable adjustment mechanisms disposed on the top surface that each define multiple pull points; and
one or more cables attached to the one or more resistance mechanisms that extend out of the multiple pull points for the one or more cable adjustment mechanisms.

20. The platform of claim 19, wherein the one or more cable adjustment mechanism includes two cable adjustment mechanisms,

wherein each of the two cable adjustment mechanisms includes multiple pull points and is associated with a resistance mechanism.

21. The platform of claim 19, wherein the one or more cable adjustment mechanisms includes two vertically aligned cable adjustment mechanisms,

wherein each of the two vertically aligned cable adjustment mechanisms includes multiple pull points and is associated with a resistance mechanism.

22. The platform of claim 19, wherein the one or more cable adjustment mechanisms includes two horizontally aligned cable adjustment mechanisms,

wherein each of the two horizontally aligned cable adjustment mechanisms includes multiple pull points and is associated with a resistance mechanism.

23. The platform of claim 19, wherein the one or more cable adjustment mechanisms includes a two-dimensional cable adjustment mechanism having at least one vertically aligned track segment and at least one horizontally aligned track segment.

24.-35. (canceled)

36. A strength machine, comprising:

a platform that is configured to be placed on a floor and has a top surface upon which a user stands when performing a strength activity using the exercise machine;
one or more resistance mechanisms contained within the platform, wherein the one or more resistance mechanisms include an integrated motor and spool device; one or more cables attached to the spool device that extend out of one or more pull points disposed on the top surface of the platform; and one or more handles coupled to the one or more cables.

37. The strength machine of claim 36, wherein the spool device includes grooves that receive sections of the one or more cables when the one or more cables wrap around the spool device.

38. The strength machine of claim 37, wherein the spool device is configured to wrap the one or more cables in a single horizontal layer.

39.-69. (canceled)

70. The strength machine of claim 36, wherein the one or more resistance mechanisms include a locking mechanism that locks the motor from rotating when the strength machine is not in use.

71. The strength machine of claim 70, wherein the locking mechanism includes:

a motor lock pin; and
a motor lock solenoid configured to move the motor lock pin into one or more holes disposed on a base of a motor housing of the motor.
Patent History
Publication number: 20240189651
Type: Application
Filed: Mar 31, 2022
Publication Date: Jun 13, 2024
Inventors: Mark DRAYER (Doylestown, PA), Corrine SAVAIANO (New York, NY), Trevor TIMSON (Brooklyn, NY), Rachael BELL (New York, NY), Brian PERRAULT (New York, NY), Alaina APPELBAUM (New York, NY), Michael GARCIA (New York, NY), Lauren CHANEN (New York, NY), Ben NIEWOOD (New York, NY), Matt CULVER (New York, NY), Jatnna BARRERA (New York, NY), Peter CAPRARO (New York, NY), Derek YAP (New York, NY), Annie MARA (New York, NY), Kevin SIMMONS (New York, NY), PJ FREDERICK (New York, NY), Heidi FARRELL (New York, NY), Brandon HICKS (New York, NY), Sherry YU (New York, NY), Michael BERLINGER (New York, NY), John Stanley DEY, IV (New York, NY), Ganapati PAI (New York, NY), Daniel CHAN (New York, NY), Spencer LING (New York, NY), Yan LI (New York, NY), Niklas LEKSELIUS (New York, NY), Jim HUNG (New York, NY), Jin CHEN (New York, NY), Peyman Hamed Sayed HOSSEINI (New York, NY), Raymond CHEN (New York, NY), Bobby HEJNY (New York, NY), Phil KEARNEY (New York, NY), Kevin WINN (New York, NY), Lawrence JESPER (New York, NY), Kunal JETHWANI (New York, NY), Enrique ORTIZ (New York, NY), Arnie BHADURY (New York, NY), Gayatri SHANDAR (New York, NY), Greg JONES (New York, NY), Kristen COKE (New York, NY), Mete POLAT (New York, NY)
Application Number: 18/553,078
Classifications
International Classification: A63B 21/00 (20060101); A63B 21/005 (20060101); A63B 24/00 (20060101);